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Is this in the literature?

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  • Gentile, David
    I ve not seen this in a title search, and it is not in my commentaries. Isaiah is described as the New Exodus in one source, and another source says that the
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 28, 2006
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      I've not seen this in a title search, and it is not in my commentaries.
      Isaiah is described as the "New Exodus" in one source, and another
      source says that the sandals and staff may be a vague allusion to
      Exodus, but no commentary seems to have made this connection, below. Am
      I just not looking in the right commentaries?

      In Mark 4:35-41 the waters obey the command of Jesus. Then in Mark
      7:45-52 Jesus comes walking on water through the storm. The disciples
      may have some trouble seeing him, "he looks like a ghost". We are then
      told the disciples have not understood (about the bread), and that their
      "hearts have been hardened". By the references to a water miracle and
      "hardening hearts" Mark is evoking Exodus. Now in the two miracles at
      sea we can see first Moses commanding the waters of the red sea in
      Exodus, and then the new Exodus of Isaiah 43:16f "Thus says Yahweh who
      made a way through the sea, a path in the raging waters...Look I am
      doing something new, it emerges; can you not see it?" Again we have a
      theme of moving from the old covenant to the new. Echoes of the emerging
      Kingdom are found in the parables of the seeds, Mark 4:26-32.

      Mark has another reference to Exodus not long before the walking on
      water. In the sending of the twelve Mark 6:8 says that they should take
      only sandals a staff, and no spare tunic. This echoes Exodus 12:11 "This
      is how you are to eat it: with your cloak tucked into your belt, your
      sandals on your feet and your staff in your hand. Eat it in haste; it is
      the Lord's Passover." Mark has sent forth the 12 disciples, in the new
      Exodus, as the 12 tribes were sent forth in the original Exodus. We can
      also note that this new Exodus follows shortly after Jesus the prophet
      is rejected by his own people in Mark 6:1f.

      Matthew and Luke both remove the Exodus reference; they both say that
      nothing should be taken on the journey. Matthew has Jesus walking on the
      water (Mt. 14:22) but removes Mark's "hardened hearts" and the
      exhortation for us to look into this deeply, and see the new Exodus.
      Luke's solution is to completely omit the "walking on the water"
      section.

      Dave Gentile

      Riverside, IL





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