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RE: [Synoptic-L] Lk 20:35 & Tertullian

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  • David Mealand
    The chief oddity is that Tertullian seems to accept the Latin version which leads to the Marcionite standpoint (the deity of that world). What he does in reply
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 31, 2011
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      The chief oddity is that Tertullian seems
      to accept the Latin version which leads to
      the Marcionite standpoint (the deity of that world).
      What he does in reply is simply to assert (rightly) that the sentence
      should be construed with "of that era" taken with what
      follows rather than what precedes.

      What T "should have done" is to cite the Greek
      that we have for Lk. 20.35 where the verb is passive
      and there is no direct mention of God.
      Or else if he had an early copy of one of the
      other Latin versions with a similar reading he could
      have cited them as the "correct" text. But he did not
      do either of these.

      So either T was citing loosely, or there is a deeper
      problem with the text of Lk 20.35. For the former option
      see the footnote from a thesis cited below, especially the
      concluding line. For the latter see the debate about
      gnostic and ascetic views based on Lk.20.35 cited by Sullivan
      in Paradise Now.

      David M.

      -----------footnote from Doyle's thesis (on web)---------
      THE CONCEPT AND PRACTICE OF PRAYER IN TERTULLIAN'S DE ORATIONE
      AND ORIGEN'S PERI EUCHES, 2000, p.12 n4)

      Paul and France Monceaux note that Tertullian cites works differently
      in different genres of writings. In his apologetic writings,
      Tertullian seems to cite from memory. In his theological or polemical
      writings he appears to refer more precisely to the text. In his
      writings that have the flavour of commentary, he looks as though he
      has the text before him. The Monceaux also indicate that Tertullian
      would be more apt to use the Greek text of the Bible when discussing
      issues in the Carthaginian church. See Paul and France Monceaux,
      Tertullien et les origines, Tome 1. Histoire littéraire de 1' Afrique
      chrétienne depuis les origines jusqu'a l'invasion arabe. (Paris: E.
      Leroux, 190 1 ), 109- 1 1 1. Johannes Quasten refers to the work of J.
      Quispel who concludes that in Tertullian's Adversus Marcionem, "the
      biblical quotations, whether Marcionite or Catholic, were turned by
      Tertullian himself and do not depend on some previously existing
      versions." See Johannes Quasten, Patrologv. Volume 2. The Ante-Nicene
      Literature after Irenaeus. (Allen, Texas: Christian Classics, 1983),
      275. O'Malley supports such a view when he writes, "[Tertullian's]
      very numerous citations of, and allusions to the scriptures show a
      great freedom and variety." (p. 2)
      ---------------------






      ---------
      David Mealand, University of Edinburgh


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