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RE: [Synoptic-L] Early interpolations

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  • E Bruce Brooks
    To: Synoptic In Response To: Leonard On: Scripture and Jesus s Death From: Bruce LEONARD: Matthew has no problem elsewhere referring to the death of Jesus
    Message 1 of 73 , Sep 4, 2011
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      To: Synoptic
      In Response To: Leonard
      On: Scripture and Jesus's Death
      From: Bruce

      LEONARD: Matthew has no problem elsewhere referring to the death of Jesus
      being in accordance with what "has been written", as he does in 26:24, and
      again, with a cited scripture, in 26:31.

      BRUCE: Both of these copy Mark. They predict, respectively, the flight of
      the disciples and the betrayal of Jesus. These are not predictions of the
      death of Jesus, any more than are the comparable passages in Mark. They
      predict certain details in the last days of Jesus. Both details might have
      come true, and Jesus might still have escaped and gone into hiding.

      ---------

      But while we are on the subject, I should correct a previous error.
      Matthew's GEGRAPTAI passages are on the whole not his Hebraic Scripture
      citation passages. They are largely different (of them, only Mt 2:5-6 uses
      GEGRAPTAI), though they are have a certain interest of their own. There is
      a cluster of four GEGRAPTAI in Matthew's Temptation scene, all of them taken
      over by Luke (who makes further changes). Mark's three GEGRAPTAI passages in
      7:6 and 9:12-13 have counterparts in Matthew, but Matthew lacks the
      GEGRAPTAI. Why? I suspect, because these two Markan predictions are not
      about Jesus, they are foretellings of the Pharisees and records of Elijah,
      whereas the purpose of Scripture in Matthew is pretty much to forefigure
      Jesus.

      In verification of which, Mark's last three GEGRAPTAI sayings (11:17, 14:21,
      14:27, which include the two mentioned by Leonard above) *have* GEGRAPTAI
      counterparts in Matthew, presumably because all of them refer, or are made
      in Mark to refer, to Jesus's own actions and sufferings.

      As for the eleven or ten Matthew Hebraic Scripture citations, they too are
      all predictions about Jesus. There are five in the Birth and Infancy
      narratives alone. None of them has a predictive counterpart in Mark, though
      several of them add to a Markan story unit an extra touch of Scripture
      prediction, and thus validation. These Hebraic passages thus almost
      conspicuously supplement Mark. None of them, be it noted, gives Scriptural
      sanction for the predictions of Jesus about himself in Mk 8:31, to which Ron
      has called attention. One attractive feature of Ron's suggestion is that the
      "where is it written" query retains the highly consistent "Scripture"
      meaning for GEGRAPTAI.

      Bruce

      E Bruce Brooks
      University of Massachusetts at Amherst
    • David Mealand
      Out of curiosity I tried this search on Google Books interpolation OR interpolated OR interpolate subject: Gospels or New Testament Date 1900-2011 I got
      Message 73 of 73 , Sep 12, 2011
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        Out of curiosity I tried this search on Google Books

        interpolation OR interpolated OR interpolate
        subject:"Gospels" or "New Testament
        Date 1900-2011

        I got about 10 hits - far fewer than I expected. On looking at
        these (where that was possible) I noted a considerable variety
        of usage. One or other of the terms is used (in the books located)
        in relation to Mat.27.16; Mk.1.2; Lk 9-18; Jn 1.6-8 & 15; 3.22-30;
        Jn 19.35, 21.24; Rom 15-16;1 Cor.1.2-16;Josephus Apion Bk.2,or the
        Gospel of Nicodemus
        Some are "editorial" interpolations, some are interpolations with
        textual evidence, but I think one or two may be neither of these.

        As it would seem that writers of the available books don't use the term
        much I then turned to the ATLA database of journal articles
        with a similar search for
        "interpolation OR interpolated OR interpolate" (in full text) AND
        subject:"Gospels" Date 1950-2011

        This got 44 hits from a shorter span of time, most of them from items
        available in pdf, but not showing where the hits are, or what they include.
        (To check these one would need to do a lot of downloads and pdf searches.)

        Tentative conclusion: it would seem that articles use the term more
        than books do, but the snippet results from Google Books provide a
        handy list of varied examples from the NT of three different types of
        suspected "interpolation".

        David M.






        ---------
        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh






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