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RE: [Synoptic-L] Early interpolations

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  • David Inglis
    I have a big problem when trying to understand what changes the gospel authors might have made during the writing of what became the first versions of their
    Message 1 of 73 , Sep 4, 2011
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      I have a big problem when trying to understand what changes the gospel authors might have made during the writing of
      what became the first versions of their texts to be seen by anyone else (except their scribes if they used them).
      Because I've never been in the position of writing by hand anything of this length, I just don't have a good frame of
      reference to know how many false starts the authors might have made, how many pages (or scrolls?) might have been thrown
      away, how many pages of notes might have been made before writing, how many crossings out and/or re-writing there might
      have been, etc. Surely, until we have a handle on the physical process involved at the time (including, or course, the
      cost and/or availability of writing material), then I don't see that we can really understand the state of the first
      version to be seen by others. Is there anything that can shed any light on just how easy or difficult it was to produce
      that first version, and how many changes/corrections it might have contained?

      David Inglis, Lafayette, CA, 94549, USA



      From: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Synoptic@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of E Bruce Brooks
      Sent: Saturday, September 03, 2011 12:47 AM
      To: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [Synoptic-L] Early interpolations

      To: Synoptic
      On: Interpolations
      From: Bruce

      Is "interpolation" a valid category of analysis? I suspect one should at least distinguish the authorial
      self-improvement (the marginal word, or the intercalated page, added to my SBL paper the night before I give it, or
      Mark's marginal asides for when he happens to be guest preaching outside Palestine) from the hostile posthumous
      intrusion (like much of the stuff that now bespecks and theologically confuses the genuine epistles of Paul, and the
      most important of them, Rom, Gal, 1 Cor, in proportion to their perceived importance). And these in turn from the
      scribal mischances that we all know and love. Each of these probably has its own rhythm, or anyway its own aetiology,
      just as the oscilloscope trace of a clarinet note is the algebraic sum of several different sinewaves, each one coming
      out of a different corner of the acoustic landscape.

      There is no glottochronology.

      Bruce

      E Bruce Brooks
      University of Massachusetts at Amherst_,_._,___



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Mealand
      Out of curiosity I tried this search on Google Books interpolation OR interpolated OR interpolate subject: Gospels or New Testament Date 1900-2011 I got
      Message 73 of 73 , Sep 12, 2011
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        Out of curiosity I tried this search on Google Books

        interpolation OR interpolated OR interpolate
        subject:"Gospels" or "New Testament
        Date 1900-2011

        I got about 10 hits - far fewer than I expected. On looking at
        these (where that was possible) I noted a considerable variety
        of usage. One or other of the terms is used (in the books located)
        in relation to Mat.27.16; Mk.1.2; Lk 9-18; Jn 1.6-8 & 15; 3.22-30;
        Jn 19.35, 21.24; Rom 15-16;1 Cor.1.2-16;Josephus Apion Bk.2,or the
        Gospel of Nicodemus
        Some are "editorial" interpolations, some are interpolations with
        textual evidence, but I think one or two may be neither of these.

        As it would seem that writers of the available books don't use the term
        much I then turned to the ATLA database of journal articles
        with a similar search for
        "interpolation OR interpolated OR interpolate" (in full text) AND
        subject:"Gospels" Date 1950-2011

        This got 44 hits from a shorter span of time, most of them from items
        available in pdf, but not showing where the hits are, or what they include.
        (To check these one would need to do a lot of downloads and pdf searches.)

        Tentative conclusion: it would seem that articles use the term more
        than books do, but the snippet results from Google Books provide a
        handy list of varied examples from the NT of three different types of
        suspected "interpolation".

        David M.






        ---------
        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh






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