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RE: [Synoptic-L] Mark and Jesus

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  • E Bruce Brooks
    To: Synoptic / GPG (to David Inglis) on: Awkward Greek in Mark. One standard place to check out the general perception is Hawkins, Horae Synopticae (2ed 131f,
    Message 1 of 47 , Jul 3, 2011
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      To: Synoptic / GPG (to David Inglis) on: Awkward Greek in Mark. One standard
      place to check out the general perception is Hawkins, Horae Synopticae (2ed
      131f, the shorter list in the 1ed is at 106f). There are also several
      monographs, eg Doudna, The Greek of the Gospel of Mark (SBL 1961), which
      separates usages in which Mark is paralleled by the papyri, and is thus
      contemporary unlearned Greek, and usages unique to Mark. The question of
      Semitic influence (and the possible translation theory) is also included,
      and Doudna finds, as have others before him, that Semitic interference (or
      "Biblicism") is higher in the sayings material than in the narrative
      material. Doudna at the end leaves certain questions (specifically, the
      translation question) open. If part of the roughness of Markan Greek is due
      to its contemporary colloquial quality, and hence its divergence from the
      educated Attic standard, then it is intelligible that the later Gospel
      writers, concerned for the good opinion of their readers, would pull Mark
      back to a more Attic standard (it is also to be noticed that they reduce or
      eliminate the Aramaic words given as such in Mark). We may recall that
      scribes in handing on all the Gospels tend to make Atticizing corrections,
      so this is a very plausible directionality. What strikes me as distinctly
      less plausible is that Mark, writing after Matthew and Luke, would move in
      the reverse direction: from a largely presentable Attic-standard Greek to a
      more colloquial, and even a more idiosyncratic, Greek. Pending a scenario
      for this, I continue to find the majority position on Mt/Lk stylistic
      correction of Mk persuasive. / E Bruce Brooks, UMass Amherst
    • David Inglis
      David Mealand wrote: So for instance to step aside from Q and M, let us consider the special Lukan material. It would be useful there to review and update
      Message 47 of 47 , Jul 26, 2011
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        David Mealand wrote:

        So for instance to step aside from Q and M, let us consider the special Lukan material. It would be useful there to review and update existing studies to see if the "L" material is a) internally consistent or not and b) differs from the editorial style of the author of Gospel number 3. Could this be an issue on which 2SH and FGT adherents might proceed in unison? Or am I being unduly optimistic here?

        David, some information can be gleaned from the stylistic analyses of the categories in the HHB concordance performed by both Dave Gentile and myself. The following 4 collections of words (HHB categories) are useful here, I think:

        · 002 – Words used in passages unique to gLk (i.e. sondergut Lk)

        · 012 – Words used in gLk in passages shared with gMk but not gMt, where the words are not in gMk

        · 102 – Words used in gLk in passages shared with gMt but not gMk, where the words are not in gMt (i.e. double tradition words not in gMt)

        · 112 – Words used in gLk in passage shared with both gMt and gMk, where the words are not in either gMt or gMk (i.e. triple tradition words not in gMt or gMk)

        Both Dave G and I have similar findings: The frequencies with which specific words are used (profiles) are similar in 002, 012, and 112, while the profile of 102 is different. In particular, I find that the similarity between the profiles of 002 and 112 is one of the greatest in my analysis, i.e. sondergut Lk is stylistically similar (at least, so far as word frequencies are concerned) to the unique Lukan parts of the triple tradition. From this I infer that 002 is unlikely to contain passages from different sources, or, if it does, that aLk has generally ‘massaged’ the text from the different sources into his own style.

        David Inglis, Lafayette, CA, 94549, USA



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