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Fw: [Synoptic-L] The "2 1/2 source" hypothesis

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  • Steph Fisher
    Hello David, I don t think we can appeal to any consensus regarding some version of a Two Source Hypothesis. Who has done the count, and what constitutes a
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 9, 2006
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      Hello David,

      I don't think we can appeal to any consensus regarding some version of a Two
      Source Hypothesis. Who has done the count, and what constitutes a scholar?

      Do you mean the "Farrer Hypothesis"? (and not Ferrier?)

      I prefer to think of it as the MwQ Hypothesis (Mark without Q). My own
      research is suggesting to me so far that my conclusion will be closer to MwQ
      than Mark with a Q. I am especially influenced by the work of both Mark
      Goodacre and Maurice Casey ("An Aramaic Approach to Q")

      As for the different birth narratives being stumbling blocks, see Mark
      Goodacre "The Case Against Q" pp. 54ff.
      Matthew's birth and resurrection narratives may have, according to the MwQH,
      initially inspired Luke to rewrite Mark with his somewhat different accounts
      of Jesus' birth and resurrection. Matthew provides Jesus with messianic
      pedigree, tracing it back to Abraham, as the son of David, but Luke carries
      the lineage further back to Adam as the son of God. Luke introduces themes
      progressively developed throughout his gospel. Jerusalem and the Temple and
      the connection between the births of Jesus and John are major elements in
      his birth narrative.

      Best wishes,

      Steph Fisher

      Napier, New Zealand
    • Ron Price
      ... Steph, That s an interesting combination. How would you even begin to reconcile Mark Goodacre s rejection of Q with Maurice Casey s preference for no less
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 10, 2006
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        Steph Fisher wrote:

        > I am especially influenced by the work of both Mark
        > Goodacre and Maurice Casey ("An Aramaic Approach to Q")

        Steph,

        That's an interesting combination.

        How would you even begin to reconcile Mark Goodacre's rejection of Q with
        Maurice Casey's preference for no less than five "Q"s? (Such a model is
        proposed in the book of Casey's which you mentioned, though I don't have the
        page number.)

        Ron Price

        Derbyshire, UK

        Web site: http://homepage.virgin.net/ron.price/index.htm
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