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Re: Reconstructions of the original Ending of Mark

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  • Wieland Willker
    ... Schmithals is cool. He thinks that there was no ending, but that Mk added Mk 14:28 and 16:7 to remind the readers of something like 1Co 15:5. The two
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 23, 2011
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      Graham E Budd wrote:
      > Schmithals: Like Linnemann's, but his source also contained
      > appearances to Peter (transposed to the Tranfiguration) and to
      > the Twelve, which he moved to 3:13-19.


      Schmithals is cool. He thinks that there was no ending, but that Mk added Mk
      14:28 and 16:7 to remind the readers of something like 1Co 15:5. The two
      verses are superfluous if the appearances to Peter and the Twelve are
      actually told at the end of the Gospel. Compare:
      Mark 14:28 But after I am raised up, I will go before you to Galilee."
      Mark 16:7 But go, tell his disciples and Peter that he is going ahead of you
      to Galilee; there you will see him, just as he told you."

      Schmithals continues with the idea that Mk nevertheless knew the stories
      about Jesus appearance to Peter and the Twelve from his source, but inserted
      them in a pre-Easter context.
      Peter: Mk 9:2-8 (the transfiguration), the Twelve: Mk 3:13-19 (the
      appointment of the disciples).
      He further knew Mk 16:15-20 from his source! Thus, according to Schmithals
      the complete ending in Mark's *source* was:
      16:1-6, 8 + 9:2-8a + 3:13-19 + 16:15-20 (not literally, but the basic
      content).


      Best wishes
      Wieland
      <><
      --------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical commentary:
      http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/
    • Chuck Jones
      Wieland, If Schmithals is correct, then his analysis begs the question, Why would Mk do all this surgery to his source? Here s an obvious answer:  Mk knew
      Message 2 of 23 , Feb 23, 2011
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        Wieland,

        If Schmithals is correct, then his analysis begs the question, Why would Mk do all this surgery to his source?

        Here's an obvious answer:  Mk knew that the third-day Jerusalem appearance legends were just that, and that the appearances of Jesus in fact occurred in Galilee, some time after Jesus' death.  He walks a redactical tightrope by including the (legendary, I believe) empty tomb story without an appearance of Jesus taking place!
        Rev. Chuck Jones
        Atlanta, Georgia
        ___________________

        Schmithals is cool. He thinks that there was no ending, but that Mk added Mk

        14:28 and 16:7 to remind the readers of something like 1Co 15:5. The two

        verses are superfluous if the appearances to Peter and the Twelve are

        actually told at the end of the Gospel. Compare:

        Mark 14:28 But after I am raised up, I will go before you to Galilee."

        Mark 16:7 But go, tell his disciples and Peter that he is going ahead of you

        to Galilee; there you will see him, just as he told you."



        Schmithals continues with the idea that Mk nevertheless knew the stories

        about Jesus appearance to Peter and the Twelve from his source, but inserted

        them in a pre-Easter context.

        Peter: Mk 9:2-8 (the transfiguration), the Twelve: Mk 3:13-19 (the

        appointment of the disciples).

        He further knew Mk 16:15-20 from his source! Thus, according to Schmithals

        the complete ending in Mark's *source* was:

        16:1-6, 8 + 9:2-8a + 3:13-19 + 16:15-20 (not literally, but the basic

        content).



        Best wishes

        Wieland

        <><

        --------------------------

        Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany

        http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie

        Textcritical commentary:

        http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/






























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