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RE: {Disarmed} [Synoptic-L] Synoptic gospel comparison in colour

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  • Richard Hubbard
    Hi Ron- Your charts are intriguing but just a bit hard to de-code (with reference to the colors). Nevertheless, the patterns are thought provoking. I have a
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 9, 2010
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      Hi Ron-

      Your charts are intriguing but just a bit hard to de-code (with reference to the colors). Nevertheless, the patterns are thought provoking.

      I have a question or two:

      First, when you compare the use of shared "words" are you working with the inflected/conjugated lexemes or are you considering the lemmatized (dictionary) form? Second, what are the parameters for the units of comparison? Are you working with verses, sentences or something else?

      Thanks for the info

      Rick Hubbard
      Maine

      |-----Original Message-----
      |From: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Synoptic@yahoogroups.com]
      |Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2010 7:05 AM
      |To: Richard Hubbard; Synoptic-L
      |Subject: {Disarmed} [Synoptic-L] Synoptic gospel comparison in colour
      |Importance: Low
      |
      |
      |
      |
      |The site indicated below contains a colour-coded comparison of the three synoptic
      |gospels. Each instance of a word is represented by a pixel and its colour shows
      |which gospel(s) include it. Mark is depicted as green, Matthew as red and Luke as
      |blue, with combinations as of primary colours except that triple tradition words are
      |black instead of the more logical white.
      |
      |All sorts of interesting characteristics can be seen in the three small rectangles, each
      |of which represents a gospel.
      |
      |Most obvious is the number of word instances unique to each gospel, with Luke
      |having the most, and Mark the least. Then there is the so-called Œgreat omission¹
      |from Mark, which shows itself in the Markan rectangle as a patch having no cyan
      |and no black. Also if you look closely you will see the word similarities of the minor
      |agreements, shown as tiny magenta dots in the predominantly black (triple tradition)
      |parts of the Lukan rectangle.
      |
      |[ http://ntmath.blogspot.com ]http://ntmath.blogspot.com
      |
      |Ron Price,
      |
      |Derbyshire, UK
      |
      |[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      |
      |
      |
      |
      |
    • Ronald Price
      ... Rick, Firstly, I should perhaps have made it clear that I was referring to the rectangles shown below the heading: Coloring Exercise . The other thing I
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 9, 2010
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        Richard Hubbard wrote:

        > I have a question or two:
        >
        > First, when you compare the use of shared "words" are you working with the
        > inflected/conjugated lexemes or are you considering the lemmatized
        > (dictionary) form?

        Rick,

        Firstly, I should perhaps have made it clear that I was referring to the
        rectangles shown below the heading: "Coloring Exercise".

        The other thing I should have made clear is that these pictures are not my
        work, so I can't answer the first question, you'll have to contact their
        creator whoever that may be (see 'View my complete profile' at the left of
        the page referred to in my previous message).

        > Second, what are the parameters for the units of
        > comparison? Are you working with verses, sentences or something else?

        They are Greek words, as indicated below 'Coloring Exercise'.

        Ron Price,

        Derbyshire, UK
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