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Re: [Synoptic-L] "I thank you, and own you" in Luke 10:21?

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  • jgibson000@comcast.net
    ... As in own up to ? I think it might be worthwhile to have a look at the OED. Jeffrey -- Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon) 1500 W. Pratt Blvd. Chicago,
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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      On 10/17/2010 1:20 PM, Bob Schacht wrote:
      >
      > Good points, Stephen. But I wonder if "confess"
      > or "acknowledge" are strong enough to convey the
      > sense of the archaic English "own."
      >
      > "Affirm" maybe?
      >
      As in "own up to"? I think it might be worthwhile to have a look at the
      OED.

      Jeffrey

      --
      Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
      1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
      Chicago, Illinois
      e-mail jgibson000@...
    • jgibson000@comcast.net
      ... -- Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon) 1500 W. Pratt Blvd. Chicago, Illinois e-mail jgibson000@comcast.net [Non-text portions of this message have been
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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        On 10/17/2010 1:51 PM, jgibson000@... wrote:
        > On 10/17/2010 1:20 PM, Bob Schacht wrote:
        >
        >> Good points, Stephen. But I wonder if "confess"
        >> or "acknowledge" are strong enough to convey the
        >> sense of the archaic English "own."
        >>
        >> "Affirm" maybe?
        >>
        >>
        > As in "own up to"? I think it might be worthwhile to have a look at the
        > OED.
        >
        > Jeffrey
        >
        >
        Here's the entry:

        > *1.* /trans./
        >
        > *a.* To have or hold as one's own; to have belonging to one, be the
        > proprietor of, possess.
        > Now the principal current sense.
        >
        > *OE* (Northumbrian) /Lindisf. Gospels: Luke/ xii. 33 /Uendite quae
        > possidetis et date elemosynam/ : bebycge{edh} {edh}a{edh}e gie
        > agnega{edh} /uel/ agon & seallas ælmisse. *OE* /Riddle 93/ 16 Ic on
        > fusum rad o{th}{th}æt him {th}one gleawstol gingra bro{th}or min
        > agnade ond mec of earde adraf.
        > *1592* W. WARNER
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-w.html#w-warner>
        > /Albions Eng./ (rev. ed.) VII. xxxvii. 165 My hap was harder than to
        > owne in that distresse a Crust. *1595* E. C. /Emaricdulfe/ v, The
        > quired Muses on her lips doe storie Their heauen sweet notes, as if
        > that place they owned. */a/1616* SHAKESPEARE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#shakespeare>
        > /Coriolanus/ (1623) I. ix. 3 Not Affricke ownes a Serpent I abhorre
        > More then thy Fame and Enuy. *1650* A. BRADSTREET
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b3.html#a-bradstreet>
        > /Tenth Muse/ 85 A costly work, which none could doe but he, Who own'd
        > the treasures of proud Babylon, And those which seem'd with
        > Sardanapal's gone. *1662* S. PEPYS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p2.html#s-pepys>
        > /Diary/ 20 May (1970) III. 86 It is not so well done as when Roxalana
        > was there{em}who, it is said, is now owned by my Lord of Oxford.
        > *1722* D. DEFOE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-d.html#d-defoe>
        > /Moll Flanders/ 397 There..is the Gentleman that owns the Plantation.
        > *1781* W. COWPER
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-c4.html#w-cowper>
        > /Retirem./ 579 The estate his sires had owned in ancient years. *1858*
        > E. H. SEARS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#e-h-sears>
        > /Athanasia/ II. ii. 185 Gardens owned by the wealthier residents of
        > the city. *1874* T. HARDY
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h.html#t-hardy>
        > /Far from Madding Crowd/ I. xxx. 331 Dearly am I beginning to pay for
        > the honour of owning a pretty face. *1937* /Amer. Home/ Apr. 84/4
        > There came to my mind..a small flat iron I had owned as a child.
        > *1992* /Disability Now/ May 10/1 She was severely disabled in a car
        > crash..and owns an adapted bungalow in Maidenhead.
        >
        > *b.* /fig./ and in extended use. To have control over or direction of
        > (a person or thing).
        > In Old English attested only in quot. OE; some editors have regarded
        > /ægnian/ in this quot. as a different word or as requiring emendation
        > (see /Dict. Old Eng./ s.v. /{amac}gnian/ for a summary of other
        > suggestions).
        >
        > *OE* /Exodus/ 265 {Th}æt hie lifigende leng ne moton ægnian mid
        > yrm{edh}um Israhela cyn.
        > *1890* /Spectator/ 19 July 77/2 Their [/sc./ U.S. millionaires']
        > practice of 'owning', that is, controlling, both the professional
        > politicians and the press. *1946* /Sun /(Baltimore)// 8 Oct. 15/8
        > Charley Chaney, who has been going great guns outoftown, now is
        > 'owned' by George Shappard. *1979* /Lore & Lang./ Jan. 8, I was told
        > that since he 'decides' or 'owns the game' this endows him with the
        > sole power to 'make all the suggestions, choose who can play and chuck
        > people out if they don't behave themselves'. *1989* C. S. MURRAY
        > /Crosstown Traffic/ i. 28 The USA 'owns' the history of the Vietnamese
        > war despite losing the conflict itself.
        >
        > *{dag}c.* To have as one's function or responsibility. /Obs./
        >
        > */a/1616* SHAKESPEARE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#shakespeare>
        > /Winter's Tale/ (1623) IV. iv. 143, I wish..that you might euer do
        > Nothing but that: moue still, still so: And owne no other Function.
        > *1714* POPE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p3.html#pope>
        > /Rape of Lock/ (new ed.) II. 15 Of these the Chief the Care of Nations
        > own, And guard with Arms Divine the /British Throne/.
        >
        > *d.* orig. /U.S./ To be or feel responsible for considering or solving
        > (a problem, issue, task, etc.). Cf. OWNERSHIP
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/cgi/crossref?query_type=word&queryword=own&first=1&max_to_show=10&sort_type=alpha&search_id=P2V6-DlMLle-5934&result_place=3&xrefword=ownership&ps=n.>
        > /n./ 2.
        >
        > *1970* T. GORDON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-g2.html#t-gordon>
        > /P.E.T. Parent Effectiveness Training/ vi. 116 When a child's behavior
        > is unacceptable to a parent because in some tangible way it interferes
        > with the parent's enjoyment of life or his right to satisfy his own
        > needs, the parent clearly 'owns' the problem. *1982* /N.Y. Times/ 5
        > Dec. XXIII. 2/4 The company people own the problem, and some of them
        > would be in a position to shoot down our solutions later if they were
        > not included. *1991* /Bellcore News/ 9 Oct. 4/1 Heilmeier set the tone
        > of the workshop by calling on us to own the problem and not toss it
        > over the fence to another organization. *2000* M. G. PRATT & J. E.
        > DUTTON in N. M. Ashkanasy et al. /Emotions in Workplace/ 114 Whereas
        > some informants took limited ownership of the issue, other staff
        > members could be described as not owning the issue at all.
        >
        > *{dag}2.* /trans./ To make (a thing) one's own; to gain possession or
        > control of; to appropriate, seize, win; to adopt as one's own. /Obs./
        >
        > *OE* (Northumbrian) /Lindisf. Gospels: Matt./ v. 4 /Beati mites
        > quoniam ipsi posidebunt terram/ : eadge bi{edh}on {edh}a milde
        > for{edh}on {edh}a agnega{edh} [*OE* /Rushw./ gesitta{edh}, *OE* /West
        > Saxon Gospels/: /Corpus Cambr./ agun] eor{edh}o. *lOE* KING ÆLFRED tr.
        > Boethius /De Consol. Philos./ (Bodl.) xiv. 30 Hu miht {th}u {th}on
        > {th}e agnian heora god? *?/c/1200* /Ormulum/ (Burchfield transcript)
        > l. 5649 {Th}iss sell{th}e all heffnessaerdess land. {Th}e winnenn
        > shall & ahnenn. */c/1275* (?/a/1200) LA{ygh}AMON /Brut/ (Calig.) 2041
        > Al Logres {th}at lond, he æ{ygh}enede [/c/*1300* /Otho/ ho{th}node] to
        > his æ{ygh}ere hond. */c/1300* (?/a/1200) LA{ygh}AMON /Brut/ (Otho)
        > 12519 Ich hahte ohni [/c/*1275* /Calig./ to bi{ygh}eten] Rome.
        >
        > *3.* /trans./
        >
        > *a.* To claim as being one's own; to lay claim to. In early use
        > (/Anglo-Saxon Law/): to declare (a thing) one's own property. Now
        > /rare/ (/Sc./ and /Eng. regional/ (/north./) in later use).
        >
        > *OE* /Laws of Cnut/ (Nero) II. xxiv. §2. 326 Gyf he gewitnesse
        > hæbbe..{th}onne tyme hit man {th}riwa; æt {th}am feor{edh}an cyrre
        > agnige hit o{edh}{edh}e agyfe {th}am {th}e hit age. *lOE* /Laws:
        > Dunsæte/ (Corpus Cambr.) viii. §3. 378 Gif hit man begeondan str[e]ame
        > agnian wylle, {edh}one sceal {th}æt beon mid ordale. *lOE* /Laws of
        > Edward the Elder/ (Rochester) I. i. §5. 140 Gif enig yfelra manna wære
        > {edh}e wolde o{edh}res yrfe to borge settan for wi{edh}ertihtlan,
        > {edh}æt he gecy{th}e {edh}onne mid a{edh}e, {edh}æt he hit for nanum
        > facne ne dyde, ac mid fulryhte butan brede & bigswice; & se dyde
        > {th}onne swa {edh}er he dorste, {edh}e hit man ætfenge: swa he hit
        > agnode swa he hit tymde.
        > */a/1644* F. QUARLES
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-q.html#f-quarles>
        > /Solomons Recant./ (1645) i. 2 There's nothing modern times can own,
        > The which precedent Ages have not known. *1658-9* T. BURTON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b4.html#t-burton>
        > /Diary/ (1828) III. 5, I move to choose your clerk. The person in
        > place may be deserving,..but own your privilege in choosing. *1712* R.
        > STEELE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s4.html#r-steele>
        > /Spectator/ No. 555. {page}3, I might have owned these several Papers
        > with the free Consent of these Gentlemen. *1815* /Chron./ in /Ann.
        > Reg./ 51/2 Both bodies..were carried to the bone-house to be owned.
        > *1824* J. MACTAGGART
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-m.html#j-mactaggart>
        > /Sc. Gallovidian Encycl./ 95 Baith own'd the hive, tho' it was thought
        > To neither to belang. *1896* J. K. SNOWDEN
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s3.html#j-k-snowden>
        > /Web of Old Weaver/ 136 Is there one to be owned?
        >
        > *b.* To call (a person or thing) one's own; to acknowledge as
        > belonging to oneself, esp. in respect of kinship or authorship.
        >
        > */a/1616* SHAKESPEARE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#shakespeare>
        > /Tempest/ (1623) V. i. 278 Two of these Fellowes, you Must know, and
        > owne, this Thing of darkenesse, I Acknowledge mine. */a/1616*
        > SHAKESPEARE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#shakespeare>
        > /Winter's Tale/ (1623) III. ii. 87 Thy Brat hath been cast out..No
        > Father owning it. *1632* H. REYNOLDS /Mythomystes/ 36, I am fully of
        > opinion (which till I find reason to recant, I will not bee ashamed to
        > owne) that [etc.]. *1691* A. WOOD
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-w3.html#a-wood>
        > /Athenæ Oxon./ II. 642 He hath also published little trivial
        > things..which he will not own. *1738* POPE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p3.html#pope>
        > /Epil. to Satires/ I. 133-6 Vice is undone, if she forgets her
        > Birth..'tis the Fall degrades her to a Whore; Let Greatness own her,
        > and she's mean no more. *1773* /Ann. Reg. 1772/ 249/1 At last, the
        > bishops were called to appear before the privy-council. They were
        > asked, 'If they owned their petition?' *1837* N. H. BANNISTER
        > /England's Iron Days/ II. i. 16 There stands the palace, near which,
        > my brother dwells. Shall I see him? Will he own me? *1856* M. J.
        > HOLMES
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h3.html#m-j-holmes>
        > /Homestead/ 260 Is what you have told us true? and does Mr. Herndon
        > own his daughter? *1985* M. LARSON /Pawns & Symbols/ viii. 154 The
        > child is kin-reft, Commander. No /Theld/ will own her. *1992* T.
        > ENRIGHT tr. S. O'Crohan /Day in our Life/ (1993) 65 The baby is a
        > couple of months old, with Máire trying to get the father to own the
        > child.
        >
        > *c.* To acknowledge as an acquaintance; to recognize as familiar. Now
        > /Irish English/, /Sc./, and /Eng. regional/ (/north./).
        >
        > */a/1627* J. BEAUMONT
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b2.html#j-beaumont>
        > /Bosworth-field/ (1629) 151 They [/sc./ his Parents] in this glasse
        > their seu'rall beauties place, And owne themselues in his delightfull
        > face. *1650* T. FULLER
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-f2.html#t-fuller>
        > /Pisgah-sight of Palestine/ II. ix. 192 Our eares and eyes quickly own
        > those objects far off, with which formerly they have been familiarly
        > acquainted. *1662* S. PEPYS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p2.html#s-pepys>
        > /Diary/ 27 Apr. (1970) III. 71, I..met my Lord Chamberlaine..who owned
        > and spoke to me. *1773* JOHNSON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-j.html#johnson>
        > /Let./ 21 Sept. (1992) II. 72, I was owned at table by one who had
        > seen me at a Philosophical Lecture. *1868* J. C. ATKINSON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-a2.html#j-c-atkinson>
        > /Gloss. Cleveland Dial./ 20 /Awn/, to own or acknowledge, as a friend
        > or acquaintance, that is; to visit. *1884* D. GRANT
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-g2.html#d-grant>
        > /Lays/ 79 I'm herty, hale an' ruddy,..Own'd at market, mill, an'
        > smiddy. *1953* M. TRAYNOR /Eng. Dial. Donegal/ 205/1 /Own/,..to
        > recognise, acknowledge aquaintance. He didn't own me. *1997* W.
        > ROLLINSON /Dict. Cumbrian Dial./ 116/2 Nay, tha's grown! Ah wadn't
        > own'd ye if ye hedn't spokken.
        >
        > *{dag}d.* To attribute (a thing) /to/ some source. /Obs./ /rare/.
        >
        > *1740* tr. C. de Fieux /Fortunate Country Maid/ I. 49, I found no
        > Difficulty in owning to them the Occasion of this dangerous Illness.
        >
        > *4.* /trans./
        >
        > *{dag}a.* To acknowledge as due; = OWE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/cgi/crossref?query_type=word&queryword=own&first=1&max_to_show=10&sort_type=alpha&search_id=P2V6-DlMLle-5934&result_place=3&xrefword=owe&ps=v.>
        > /v./ 3a. With /unto/ or indirect object. /Obs./
        >
        > *1560* J. DAUS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-d.html#j-daus>
        > tr. J. Sleidane /Commentaries/ f. xliij, He must take his othe to owne
        > him his faith and obeidience. *1561* tr. /Calvin's 4 Serm. Idol./ i. B
        > ij b, To do all thing other wise then he [God] will, and cleane to be
        > void of the studye and dutye which we owne vnto him. *1699* R. BENTLEY
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b2.html#r-bentley>
        > /Diss. Epist. Phalaris/ (new ed.) Pref. p. vi, I said enough to make
        > any Person of common Justice and Ingenuity have own'd me thanks for
        > preventing him from doing a very ill Action.
        >
        > *{dag}b.* To acknowledge as due to oneself; to accept as deserved or
        > merited. /Obs./ /rare/.
        >
        > */a/1643* LD. FALKLAND
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-f.html#ld-falkland>
        > /Disc. Infallibility/ (1646) 108 Guilt enough to owne that severity.
        >
        > *c.* To acknowledge as having supremacy, authority, or power over
        > oneself; to recognize or profess obedience to (a greater power, a
        > superior, etc.). In later use only with abstract objects, esp. in */to
        > own /*(a person's)/* sway*/. Now somewhat /arch./
        >
        > *1695* R. BLACKMORE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b2.html#r-blackmore>
        > /Prince Arthur/ I. 2 The Prince of Darkness owns the Conquerour, And
        > yields his Empire to a mightier Pow'r. */c/1709* M. PRIOR
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p3.html#m-prior>
        > /1st Hymn Callimachus/ 99 Man owns the power of kings; and kings of
        > Jove. *1814* SHELLEY
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#shelley>
        > /Summer-evening Churchy./ ii, Silence and twilight..breathe their
        > spells..Light, sound, and motion own the potent sway. *1856*
        > /Littell's Living Age/ 12 July 125/1 That magnificent island..which
        > still owns the dominion of the Spanish flag. *1870* J. ELLERTON
        > /Evening/ in /Church Hymns/ (1871) 29 Till all Thy creatures own Thy
        > sway. *1874* J. R. GREEN
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-g2.html#j-r-green>
        > /Short Hist. Eng. People/ i. §3. 23 Wessex owned his overlordship as
        > it had owned that of Oswald. *1902* W. JAMES
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-j.html#w-james>
        > /Varieties Relig. Experience/ xv, We quail under his [/sc./ the
        > chief's] glance, and are at the same time proud of owning so dangerous
        > a lord. *1926* A. B. SIMPSON /Challenge of Missions/ iv, Earth's
        > generations for a thousand years in millions and billions shall own
        > His sway and crown Him Lord of all. *1939* H. D. F. KITTO /Greek
        > Trag./ xiii. 379 The old men are to own his sway, as Pentheus himself
        > will do, so much more terribly, in his last scene.
        >
        > *5. a.* /trans./ To acknowledge (a person or thing) as affecting
        > oneself; (more generally) to acknowledge (a thing) to be as claimed,
        > or to be a fact; to confess to be valid, true, or actual; to admit.
        >
        > (/a/) With simple object.
        >
        > */a/1620* T. CAMPION
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-c.html#t-campion>
        > /Wks./ (1967) 480 Could my poore hart whole worlds of toungs employ,
        > The greifes it ownes that number would out goe. *1655* T. STANLEY
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s4.html#t-stanley>
        > /Hist. Philos./ I. I. 12 Which Aristotle hath borrow'd from him, not
        > owning the Author. *1666* S. PEPYS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p2.html#s-pepys>
        > /Diary/ 27 Oct. (1972) VII. 343 How high the Catholiques are
        > everywhere and bold in the owning their religion. *1711* /London Gaz./
        > No. 4795/4, Stoln or strayed,..a..Mare,..lately paced, but does not
        > freely own it. *1749* H. FIELDING
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-f.html#h-fielding>
        > /Tom Jones/ V. XV. xi. 283 Her Age was about thirty, for she owned six
        > and twenty. *1769* F. BROOKE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b4.html#f-brooke>
        > /Hist. Emily Montague/ II. cxvi. 209, I have at once refused to marry
        > Colonel Rivers, and owned to him all the tenderness of my soul. *1814*
        > H. F. CARY
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-c.html#h-f-cary>
        > tr. Dante /Paradiso/ VIII. 134 Nature..no distinction owns 'Twixt one
        > or other household. *1876* J. PARKER
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-p.html#j-parker>
        > /Paraclete/ I. viii. 114 The world has never cared to own its need of
        > the Son of man. *1902* W. D. HOWELLS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h4.html#w-d-howells>
        > /Kentons/ iii. 26 'He doesn't say so, even now.' 'No, he doesn't.' It
        > hurt her mother to own the fact that alone gave her hope. *1927* V.
        > WOOLF
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-w3.html#v-woolf>
        > /To Lighthouse/ I. viii. 70 A man afraid to own his own feelings, who
        > could not say, This is what I like. */a/1983* 'R. WEST'
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-w2.html#r-west>
        > /This Real Night/ (1984) I. iii. 97 Gipsies do steal... Uncle Len
        > owned it. They steal.
        >
        > (/b/) With object and complement. In later use chiefly /refl./
        >
        > *1609* SHAKESPEARE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s2.html#shakespeare>
        > /Pericles/ xix. 204 For what thou professest, a Baboone could he
        > speak, would owne a name too deere, that the gods wold safely deliuer
        > me from this place. *1620* I. C. /Tow Merry Milke-maids/ I. iii, If
        > the Emperor himselfe were here, He now wud owne me for his Kinswoman.
        > *1665* J. BUNYAN
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b4.html#j-bunyan>
        > /Holy Citie/ 90 The Servants of Christ are here owned to be the
        > foundations of this Wall. *1709* /Tatler/ No. 63. {page}5 There are
        > few, very few, that will own themselves in a Mistake. *1758* S.
        > HAYWARD
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h2.html#s-hayward>
        > /Seventeen Serm./ iv. 114, I readily own myself at a loss. *1815* W.
        > H. IRELAND
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-i.html#w-h-ireland>
        > /Scribbleomania/ 256 To the labours of Lindley Murray the rising
        > generation will own itself highly indebted. *1883* R. L. STEVENSON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s4.html#r-l-stevenson>
        > /Treasure Island/ I. II. xii. 99 You were right, and I was wrong. I
        > own myself an ass, and I await your orders. *1926* R. H. TAWNEY
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-t.html#r-h-tawney>
        > /Relig. & Rise of Capitalism/ iv. 201 He is a natural republican, for
        > there is none on earth that he can own as master. *1948* T. HEGGEN
        > /Mister Roberts/ iii. 47 Every once in a while he had to own himself
        > impressed at the imaginativeness of the sick-call complaints. *1986*
        > T. MO /Insular Possession/ xxiii. 273 If it means the liberty of
        > affronting, calumniating and defaming one another, I, for my part, own
        > myself willing to part with my share of it.
        >
        > (/c/) With clause as object (in 18th cent. also with /to/-infinitive).
        >
        > *1663* /Case Madam Mary Carleton/ 83 He..did own that he did marry one
        > Mary Moders, a daughter of one in Canterbury. *1718* LADY M. W.
        > MONTAGU
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-m4.html#lady-m-w-montagu>
        > /Let./ 28 Aug. (1965) I. 432, I hope You'l own I have made good use of
        > my time. *1745* E. HAYWOOD
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h2.html#e-haywood>
        > /Female Spectator/ No. 14 (1748) III. 70 You will here~after own to be
        > guilty of an injustice you will be ashamed of. *1799* P. SPINDLESHANKS
        > /Battle of Two Taylors/ 9 That much I lik'd it I will own, Nor in
        > this, am I left alone. */a/1854* R. M. BIRD
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b2.html#r-m-bird>
        > /News of Night/ II. iv. in /America's Lost Plays/ (1941) XII. 158 Twas
        > very unlucky of me to interrupt you, wasn't? Yes, I'll own it was.
        > *1873* A. HELPS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h2.html#a-helps>
        > /Animals & their Masters/ (1875) v. 115, I own to you that I have a
        > great fear of the damage that ridicule might do. *1884* W. COLLINS
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-c3.html#w-collins>
        > /Mr. Lepel & Housekeeper/ in /Little Novels/ (1887) II. 202 'I have so
        > much to say to you,' she owned, 'when you are stronger and fitter to
        > hear me.' *1915* V. WOOLF
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-w3.html#v-woolf>
        > /Voy. Out/ i. 14 When questioned she had to own that she had never
        > asked him. *1988* L. GORDON /Eliot's New Life/ ii. 53 Eliot owned to
        > Pound that he just naturally smelt out witches.
        >
        > *b.* /intr./ To confess or admit /to/ something; = /to own up/ at
        > sense 5c. Now somewhat /literary/.
        >
        > *1772* D. GARRICK
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-g.html#d-garrick>
        > /Irish Widow/ II. 47 Witness, good folks, he owns to the promise.
        > *1814* BYRON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b4.html#byron>
        > /Wks./ (1832) III. 39 He owns to having reprinted some sheets [etc.].
        > *1853* C. M. YONGE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-y.html#c-m-yonge>
        > /Heir of Redclyffe/ I. iv. 63 He owns to disliking the Doctor. *1913*
        > E. WINGFIELD-STRATFORD /Hist. Eng. Patriotism/ I. I. vi. 223 We must
        > own to a certain distaste for the cold and rather priggish character
        > of the righteous Artegall. *1961* L. LEWIS /Connoisseurs & Secret
        > Agents 18th Cent. Rome/ iv. 97 As he did not own to having been in
        > secret communication with some of the British Ministers Essex could
        > not refer to that, he said. *1983* P. LEVI /Flutes of Autumn/ ix. 178,
        > I must own to having been put off this poet recently by a volume of
        > dull letters.
        >
        > *c.* /intr./ orig. /U.S./ /colloq./ */to own up/*: to make a full
        > admission or confession, esp. when challenged or pressed; to confess
        > frankly (/to/ something). Also with /that/ and clause.
        >
        > *1848* E. BENNETT /Renegade/ iv. 37, I 'spect I mought as well own up,
        > being's I've got cotched in my own trap. *1858* S. A. HAMMETT /Piney
        > Woods Tavern/ 28 I'm willin' to own up that I'm ginerally considered
        > to rather have a gift that way myself. *1880* TROLLOPE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-t2.html#trollope>
        > /Duke's Children/ xxxv, If you own up in a genial sort of way the
        > House will forgive anything. *1890* /Boston /(U.S.)/ Jrnl./ 23 May 1/6
        > On being arrested he owned up to his crime. *1951* /People/ 3 June 7/1
        > It will be difficult to find many regular backers who could truthfully
        > own up to a good week at Epsom. *1968* /Listener/ 1 Aug. 134/2, Being
        > forced to own up that I earn my living and have my being in that
        > world. *2000* /Sun-Herald /(Sydney)// 18 June 81/2 Your response if
        > you get caught with your hand in the cookie jar is either to say it
        > wasn't me and keep denying it, or own up and take it.
        >
        > *6.* /trans./ Esp. of God: to acknowledge as approved or accepted; to
        > declare or indicate acceptance or approval of; to countenance,
        > vindicate. Now /rare/.
        >
        > *1649* MILTON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-m3.html#milton>
        > /{Epsilon}{iota}{kappa}{omicron}{nu}{omicron}{kappa}{lambda}{alpha}{sigma}{tau}{eta}{fsigma}/
        > ix. 79 Piracy was become a project own'd and authoriz'd against the
        > Subject. *1655* O. CROMWELL
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-c4.html#o-cromwell>
        > /Speech to Parl. 22 Jan./ 23, I have the Witness of Diverse here, that
        > I think truely scorn to own Me in a Ly. *1758* S. HAYWARD
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-h2.html#s-hayward>
        > /Seventeen Serm./ Introd. 13 We might hope to find our labours more
        > owned. *1853* W. J. CONYBEARE
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-c3.html#w-j-conybeare>
        > /Ess. Eccl. & Soc./ (1855) 92 A preacher is said in this [Recordite]
        > phraseology to be 'owned' [/i.e./ of God] when he makes many converts.
        > *1859* 'G. ELIOT'
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-e.html#g-eliot>
        > /Adam Bede/ I. I. iii. 58 He has called me to speak his word, and he
        > has greatly owned my work. */a/1892* C. H. SPURGEON
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s4.html#c-h-spurgeon>
        > in /Daily News/ 24 Aug. (1898) 6/2 God has owned me to the most
        > degraded and off-cast; let others serve their class; these are mine,
        > and to them I must keep. *1984* N. ANNAN /Leslie Stephen/ v. 155 The
        > initiate had only to..speak with a rapt look about his 'seals', or
        > converts, which proved that he was 'owned',..and he was accepted as
        > saved in low Evangelical circles.
        >
        > *7.* /trans./ /Hunting/. Of a hound: to show recognition of (the scent
        > of the quarry).
        >
        > *1781* P. BECKFORD
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-b2.html#p-beckford>
        > /Thoughts on Hunting/ xx. 255 Foxes will run the roads at..times, and
        > hounds cannot always own the scent. *1838* T. SMITH
        > <http://dictionary.oed.com.emils.lib.colum.edu/help/bib/oed2-s3.html#t-smith>
        > /Extracts Diary of Huntsman/ v. 126 /Owning a scent/, when hounds
        > throw their tongues on the scent. *1893* W. C. A. BLEW /Radcliffe's
        > Noble Sci. Fox-hunting/ ix. 161 A couple or two, or a single hound,
        > may have come across and struck upon the scent of a fox which has
        > shifted, unseen, across a ride. The scent in the stuff is too stale
        > for them freely to own. *1954* J. I. LLOYD /Beagling/ 142 Hounds own a
        > scent when it is strong enough for them to speak to it. *1971* G.
        > WHEELER /Year Round/ 21 Now the kale comes really alive as hounds
        > drive through it converging on Ladybird's corner. One after another
        > they own her line.



        --
        Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
        1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
        Chicago, Illinois
        e-mail jgibson000@...



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bob Schacht
        ... So acknowledge certainly fits the OED usage (definition #2), and you were right to connect it with own up to . But I defer to your not so very concise
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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          At 11:51 AM 10/17/2010, jgibson000@... wrote:
          >On 10/17/2010 1:20 PM, Bob Schacht wrote:
          >>
          >>Good points, Stephen. But I wonder if "confess"
          >>or "acknowledge" are strong enough to convey the
          >>sense of the archaic English "own."
          >>
          >>"Affirm" maybe?
          >>
          >As in "own up to"? I think it might be worthwhile to have a look at the OED.

          According to Babylon 8, here's what the concise(!) OED sez:

          > verb
          > possess; have.
          > formal admit or acknowledge that something is the case.
          > (own up) admit to having done something wrong or embarrassing.

          So "acknowledge" certainly fits the OED usage (definition #2), and
          you were right to connect it with "own up to".

          But I defer to your not so very concise offering from the OED.

          Bob


          >Jeffrey
          >
          >--
          >Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
          >1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
          >Chicago, Illinois
          >e-mail jgibson000@...


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Mealand
          David Inglis asked why Tertullian translates one Greek verb in Luke 10.21 with two expressions and Stephen helpfully supplied the Latin which T used for the
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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            David Inglis asked why Tertullian translates
            one Greek verb in Luke 10.21 with two expressions
            and Stephen helpfully supplied the Latin which
            T used for the Greek ?????????????

            Tertullian, Adv Marc, 4.25
            > reads "Gratias, enim inquit, ago et confiteor, domine caeli, quod ..."
            > which means "for he says, I give thanks and confess/acknowledge, Lord
            > of heaven, that ...".

            Bauer's translators offer "confess", "acknowledge", or "praise" as
            translations of the Greek word when used in the middle.
            That still leaves us with "I give thanks" (gratias ago)
            as a slight extra in T as against "acknowledge" (confiteor)or "praise"
            but it presumably shows us what T thought the semantic range
            of the Greek word is.

            The Vulgate offers confiteor on its own here, so also Mat.11.25, I am
            not sure what the old Latin had. So that adds to the slight puzzle
            as to why T offers us two expressions for the price of one.
            Fitzmyer translates the Greek word with "I praise". RSV has "thank".
            (RV had "thank" + or "praise"). Marshall cites 1QHodayot 7.26
            for praise and thanks, and says the Greek word in Lk10.21 was
            used in the LXX to translate the relevant Hebrew word.

            Is it possible that T was aware that there might be a word
            behind the Greek which covers both thanks and praise, and that
            he wishes to capture that sense, as well as the sense of
            acknowledgement more widely accepted in the Latin versions?

            David M.


            ---------
            David Mealand, University of Edinburgh


            --
            The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
            Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
          • Horace Jeffery Hodges
            ...   Looks like this is the entry from the OED supplied by Jeffrey Gibson that corresponds to own in the passage.     Jeffery Hodges [Non-text portions
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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              > *c.* To acknowledge as having supremacy, authority, or power over
              > oneself; to recognize or profess obedience to (a greater power, a
              > superior, etc.). In later use only with abstract objects, esp. in */to
              > own /*(a person's)/* sway*/. Now somewhat /arch./

               
              Looks like this is the entry from the OED supplied by Jeffrey Gibson that
              corresponds to "own" in the passage.
               
               
              Jeffery Hodges

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • David Mealand
              Tertullian s I give thanks and acknowledge can be compared with other versions: Tischendorf s apparatus cites Epiphanius (marc 313 & 329) eucharistw soi
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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                Tertullian's "I give thanks and acknowledge"
                can be compared with other versions:

                Tischendorf's apparatus cites
                Epiphanius (marc 313 & 329) eucharistw soi
                Then he cites Tertullian, then cites Origen
                who quotes the Greek word exomologoumai
                Origen (1,221) then says the Lord's
                utterance is a paradigm
                of thanksgiving (eucharistia), and adds that
                exomologoumai is equivalent to eucharistw
                (I give thanks).

                (The mail system ate the Greek last time, so
                I haven't used Greek font. The references
                and the unaccented words reflect here the
                conventions Tischendorf was using.)

                So it would seem that the Patristic writers
                were aware of the wider semantic range
                for this word in a biblical context,
                and that is presumably why
                Tertullian offers us two expressions for one.

                David M.

                ---------
                David Mealand, University of Edinburgh


                --
                The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
                Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
              • David Inglis
                Thanks to everyone who responded to my question. Very helpful. David Inglis From: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Synoptic@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 17, 2010
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                  Thanks to everyone who responded to my question. Very helpful.



                  David Inglis



                  From: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Synoptic@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Inglis
                  Sent: Sunday, October 17, 2010 10:36 AM
                  To: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [Synoptic-L] "I thank you, and own you" in Luke 10:21?

                  At the beginning of Adv. Marcion, book 4, chapter 25, Tertullian quotes Lk 10:21 as: "I thank you, and own You, Lord of heaven, because those things which had been hidden from the wise and prudent, You have revealed unto babes." Some bibles have “I praise you” rather than “I thank you,” but I can’t find any way that “and own you” could have crept in here, so is there any possible mistake or confusion (either Greek or Latin) in Lk 10:21 or Mt 11:25 that might have led to Tertullian seeing this variant?

                  David Inglis

                  Lafayette, CA, 94549, USA





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Robert S
                  ... [snip] ... WARNING! Do NOT download Babylon 8. It corrupted my computer, interfered with other programs, and in a few days ravaged my operating system
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 22, 2010
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                    --- In Synoptic@yahoogroups.com, Bob Schacht <r_schacht@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > At 11:51 AM 10/17/2010, jgibson000@... wrote:
                    > >On 10/17/2010 1:20 PM, Bob Schacht wrote:

                    [snip]

                    > According to Babylon 8, here's what the concise(!) OED sez:
                    >
                    > > verb
                    > > possess; have.
                    > > formal admit or acknowledge that something is the case.
                    > > (own up) admit to having done something wrong or embarrassing.

                    WARNING! Do NOT download Babylon 8. It corrupted my computer, interfered with other programs, and in a few days ravaged my operating system (Windows Vista) to the point where I could not even boot up, even though I thought I had adequate protection from malware, viruses, etc. I hope none of you have downloaded this program in the past few days. If you have, uninstall it immediately. In my case, uninstalling this program was not enough, so be prepared for further defensive action.

                    Sorry I ever mentioned it.

                    Bob Schacht
                    Northern Arizona University
                  • David Inglis
                    Does anyone know of any proof that Luke came before Marcion s gospel? Forget Tertullian, Epiphanius, etc., what I m thinking of here is any reference (e.g. by
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 25, 2010
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                      Does anyone know of any proof that Luke came before Marcion's gospel? Forget
                      Tertullian, Epiphanius, etc., what I'm thinking of here is any reference
                      (e.g. by a church father) to a portion of Luke that was not in Marcion's
                      gospel, that pre-dates Marcion. If not, what is the earliest we can reliably
                      date any of these parts of Luke? Basically, I'm looking when the parts of
                      Luke known to be not in Marcion first showed up actually in Luke. Any
                      takers?



                      David Inglis

                      Lafayette, CA, 94549, USA



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • David Mealand
                      Neither Marshall nor Fitzmyer seem to go into early use of Luke by others. J.M.Creed long ago (1930) did do this, see his preface xxii-xxxii, but I am not at
                      Message 10 of 13 , Oct 28, 2010
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                        Neither Marshall nor Fitzmyer seem to go into
                        early use of Luke by others. J.M.Creed
                        long ago (1930) did do this, see his preface
                        xxii-xxxii, but I am not at all sure
                        that it will answer your question very
                        exactly.

                        Not sure that I would have a list of
                        bits of Lk that are not in Marcion anyway,
                        and early citations of the Synoptics
                        tend to be few, far between, and often
                        inexact. But I am sure someone should have
                        done a fuller study of all the early citations
                        of Luke - think I have seen something like
                        that for Matthew, but don't have the details
                        to hand.

                        David M.




                        ---------
                        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh


                        --
                        The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
                        Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
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