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Re: [Synopt] THE CHRISTOLOGY OF ACTS

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  • David Mealand
    That Acts 20.28 appears to be an unusual element in Acts is a very interesting and intriguing fact. The primary metaphor is that of purchase here. The author
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 28, 2010
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      That Acts 20.28 appears to be an unusual element
      in Acts is a very interesting and intriguing fact.
      The primary metaphor is that of purchase here.
      The author rehearses a speech claiming that
      the community is "purchased". So we have a
      financial metaphor. It is said to be acquired
      presumably for a "price".

      The speech then states the price
      to be blood i.e. (presumably in this case)
      a death. So the metaphor is now something more
      than financial. The purchase cost the blood of
      someone who was "his" (tou idiou). If one
      person rescues several others, but dies in the process
      then the successful rescue can be seen to have a
      "cost", hence the earlier explicit mention of
      purchase or acquisition and an implied price.

      If this is correct then this passage is not too distant
      from those that use ideas of ransom, present outside Luke
      in Mark 10.45, and in Luke at 24.21. The ransom
      metaphor suggests analogy with payment of money to
      buy freedom, but here it seems to intersect with
      the thought that a death is involved, as in a rescue
      where the only rescuer (or one of the rescuers)
      is killed.

      If the above analysis is correct then we do have
      ideas of purchase, cost, ransom and rescue in the
      passage which the author of Acts attributes to Paul,
      but several other soteriological metaphors are notably
      absent. We cannot go so far as to deem it highly probable
      that the author rejects other ideas, but we can say that
      some of them don't seem to appear here
      - or elsewhere in Luke-Acts.

      David Mealand



      ---------
      David Mealand, University of Edinburgh





      -----------

      --
      The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
      Scotland, with registration number SC005336.




      ----- End forwarded message -----



      def


      ---------
      David Mealand, University of Edinburgh


      --
      The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
      Scotland, with registration number SC005336.


      ----------


      That Acts 20.28 appears to be an unusual element
      in Acts is a very interesting and intriguing fact.
      The primary metaphor is that of purchase here.
      The author rehearses a speech claiming that
      the community is "purchased". So we have a
      financial metaphor. It is said to be acquired
      presumably for a "price".

      The speech then states the price
      to be blood i.e. (presumably in this case)
      a death. So the metaphor is now something more
      than financial. The purchase cost the blood of
      someone who was "his" (tou idiou). If one
      person rescues several others, but dies in the process
      then the successful rescue can be seen to have a
      "cost", hence the earlier explicit mention of
      purchase or acquisition and an implied price.

      If this is correct then this passage is not too distant
      from those that use ideas of ransom, present outside Luke
      in Mark 10.45, and in Luke at 24.21. The ransom
      metaphor suggests analogy with payment of money to
      buy freedom, but here it seems to intersect with
      the thought that a death is involved, as in a rescue
      where the only rescuer (or one of the rescuers)
      is killed.

      If the above analysis is correct then we do have
      ideas of purchase, cost, ransom and rescue in the
      passage which the author of Acts attributes to Paul,
      but several other soteriological metaphors are notably
      absent. We cannot go so far as to deem it highly probable
      that the author rejects other ideas, but we can say that
      some of them don't seem to appear here
      - or elsewhere in Luke-Acts.

      David Mealand



      ---------
      David Mealand, University of Edinburgh





      -----------

      --
      The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
      Scotland, with registration number SC005336.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dr. Ian E. Rock
      I would like to propose that the Christology of Acts is shaped less by chronology and more by the Gentilian context to which it purports to be representing
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 28, 2010
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        I would like to propose that the Christology of Acts is shaped less by
        chronology and more by the Gentilian context to which it purports to be
        representing and writing about.  The emphasis on the Spirit may have very well
        been a subersive play on the imperial cult (the genius of the Roman
        paterfamilias), a reading that may be supported by the absence of any action
        distasteful to Rome (the death of Peter and Paul) and by the rhetorical movement
        of the gospel imperative to the end of the world - a la Rome.  This being the
        case atonement theology would have been omitted or played down in the original
        text because of distastefulness of human sacrifice to Roman religion, but the
        emphasis on purchase more acceptable in keeping with the concept of the
        manumission of slaves.  I would want to explore this direction given the textual
        corruption of 20:28, which Bruce Metzger argues was changed under the influence
        of Heb 9:12.
        Dr. Ian E. Rock





        ________________________________
        From: David Mealand <D.Mealand@...>
        To: Synoptic@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, June 28, 2010 12:40:05 PM
        Subject: [Synoptic-L] Re: [Synopt] THE CHRISTOLOGY OF ACTS

         

        That Acts 20.28 appears to be an unusual element
        in Acts is a very interesting and intriguing fact.
        The primary metaphor is that of purchase here.
        The author rehearses a speech claiming that
        the community is "purchased". So we have a
        financial metaphor. It is said to be acquired
        presumably for a "price".

        The speech then states the price
        to be blood i.e. (presumably in this case)
        a death. So the metaphor is now something more
        than financial. The purchase cost the blood of
        someone who was "his" (tou idiou). If one
        person rescues several others, but dies in the process
        then the successful rescue can be seen to have a
        "cost", hence the earlier explicit mention of
        purchase or acquisition and an implied price.

        If this is correct then this passage is not too distant
        from those that use ideas of ransom, present outside Luke
        in Mark 10.45, and in Luke at 24.21. The ransom
        metaphor suggests analogy with payment of money to
        buy freedom, but here it seems to intersect with
        the thought that a death is involved, as in a rescue
        where the only rescuer (or one of the rescuers)
        is killed.

        If the above analysis is correct then we do have
        ideas of purchase, cost, ransom and rescue in the
        passage which the author of Acts attributes to Paul,
        but several other soteriological metaphors are notably
        absent. We cannot go so far as to deem it highly probable
        that the author rejects other ideas, but we can say that
        some of them don't seem to appear here
        - or elsewhere in Luke-Acts.

        David Mealand

        ---------
        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh

        -----------

        --
        The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
        Scotland, with registration number SC005336.

        ----- End forwarded message -----

        def

        ---------
        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh

        --
        The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
        Scotland, with registration number SC005336.

        ----------

        That Acts 20.28 appears to be an unusual element
        in Acts is a very interesting and intriguing fact.
        The primary metaphor is that of purchase here.
        The author rehearses a speech claiming that
        the community is "purchased". So we have a
        financial metaphor. It is said to be acquired
        presumably for a "price".

        The speech then states the price
        to be blood i.e. (presumably in this case)
        a death. So the metaphor is now something more
        than financial. The purchase cost the blood of
        someone who was "his" (tou idiou). If one
        person rescues several others, but dies in the process
        then the successful rescue can be seen to have a
        "cost", hence the earlier explicit mention of
        purchase or acquisition and an implied price.

        If this is correct then this passage is not too distant
        from those that use ideas of ransom, present outside Luke
        in Mark 10.45, and in Luke at 24.21. The ransom
        metaphor suggests analogy with payment of money to
        buy freedom, but here it seems to intersect with
        the thought that a death is involved, as in a rescue
        where the only rescuer (or one of the rescuers)
        is killed.

        If the above analysis is correct then we do have
        ideas of purchase, cost, ransom and rescue in the
        passage which the author of Acts attributes to Paul,
        but several other soteriological metaphors are notably
        absent. We cannot go so far as to deem it highly probable
        that the author rejects other ideas, but we can say that
        some of them don't seem to appear here
        - or elsewhere in Luke-Acts.

        David Mealand

        ---------
        David Mealand, University of Edinburgh

        -----------

        --
        The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
        Scotland, with registration number SC005336.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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