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Re: [Synoptic-L] Text Formation Before Publication

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  • E Bruce Brooks
    David, Thanks for the additional examples; it all helps in consciousness raising. Those who write under censorship (Soviet and other) probably offer still
    Message 1 of 3 , May 8, 2010
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      David,

      Thanks for the additional examples; it all helps in consciousness
      raising. Those who write under censorship (Soviet and other) probably
      offer still other illustrations. Less benign, but less benign
      situations do exist.

      Sometimes what is not in a work speaks as loud about the environment
      from which it comes as the stuff that is in it, and prepublication
      activity on the text may sometimes result (as in the editorial
      examples earlier given) in less text, not more text.

      I have the uncomfortable feeling that there are things left out of gMk
      by its early author(s), or maybe removed or overwritten by its late
      author(s), all of whom may or may not be the same person (my
      statistical sense is that the last one or two are not the same guy as
      the first three or four). I can see the later Gospels working to fill
      some of what they saw as narrative or theological holes. Not that they
      knew what would have been there, it seems to me that they are
      improvising, but that their sense of deficiency is intelligible, and
      maybe even in some cases points to real lacunae. The parts of Mark
      that seem to me to have maybe suffered the most are the probably much
      overwritten ones, especially those with later liturgical significance
      (strongest example, the Last Supper). It's interesting to me that the
      late layers of Mark are concerned to provide lifetime sanction for the
      Lord's Supper, but I don't detect any equal interest or activity in
      the area of Baptism. Not at least in the fraction of the early Jesus
      movement subtended by Mark. I think this sort of thing should have
      interested Lietzmann more than it seems to have done.

      The Western Non passages in Luke tend also to have liturgical
      significance. There is, to me, a lot of church history contained in
      these various passages, and the exact times at which they entered the
      authority texts.

      Bruce

      [E Bruce Brooks
      Warring States Project
      University of Massachusetts at Amherst]
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