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Re: [Synoptic-L] Virtue and Poverty

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  • Chuck Jones
    As an artisan, Jesus was in the social class below peasant and above untouchables and beggars. The fact that he was quite poor--he would have regularly lived
    Message 1 of 35 , Apr 5, 2010
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      As an artisan, Jesus was in the social class below peasant and above untouchables and beggars.


      The fact that he was quite poor--he would have regularly lived through days in which he did not have enough to eat--is omitted from the interpretation of his teachings to an extent that astonishes me.

      For example, Jesus had nothing to renounce, so he cannot be a model of financial self-sacrifice on behalf of others (this action may have merit, but Jesus cannot be its model).


      Likewise, the Jesus vs. Empire that's been emerging in the last 5 years, begs an important question too.  If Jesus' program was about "distributive justice,"  then it was about improving his own financial and economic situation.  Is that really what his teachings would indicate?


      How do these interpretations square with the body of teachings in which he uses the goodness of the world around him as proof of the Father's care and evidence that his listeners should not worry about their physical needs?


      Chuck Jones
      Interim Executive Director
      Westar Institute - The Jesus Seminar







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    • Chuck Jones
      Jack, There was no personal income tax back then.  The owner of the land was taxed on the harvest, not the workers on the land.  The more you tax the owner,
      Message 35 of 35 , Apr 10, 2010
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        Jack,


        There was no personal income tax back then.  The owner of the land was taxed on the harvest, not the workers on the land.  The more you tax the owner, the less is left for wages.  This was far from the only dynamic in play in the poverty of peasants, but that's the way it worked.


        Chuck


        --- On Fri, 4/9/10, Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...> wrote:

        I have to admit that by modern example killing the geese that lay the golden

        eggs seems just as stupid now as it was then.



        Jack








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