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Re: [GPG] ARONSON 4 (LUKE)

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  • E Bruce Brooks
    To: GPG Cc: Previous On: ARONSON 4 From: Bruce We were testing the notion that the DDJ/NT parallels offered by Aronson perhaps amounted to something, and
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 23, 2009
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      To: GPG
      Cc: Previous
      On: ARONSON 4
      From: Bruce

      We were testing the notion that the DDJ/NT parallels offered by Aronson perhaps
      amounted to something, and endeavoring to define and locate the something. A
      first skim of his material suggested that the something, if it existed,
      amounted to an input from a W (or Wacko) group, whose content was defined in
      DDJ terms by Aronson (but that is always available for reconsideration) and the
      Gospel sequence minus John (that is, the Syrian and not also the Ephesian
      Gospel tradition).

      We may note at this point that the operative world of the Syrian (or Synoptic)
      Gospels has two layers: (1) a Penalty layer, in which supernatural forces will
      penalize wrong behavior, upon which is superimposed (2) a Destruction layer, in
      which supernatural forces will presently bring the entire world to an end. The
      strategy of the individual is thus to survive, or be "saved" from these future
      disasters, like one of the two giraffes on the SS Noah, the effect of the
      second idea being to add urgency and intensification to the first idea.
      Further, in this worldview, all events of interest (though not all events of
      relevance) are future. This of course contrasts with the operative world of the
      DDJ, in which neither (1) nor (2) above obtains, and in which, for one thing,
      the universe is envisioned as continually present. In estimating the goodness
      of fit of any one parallel, some adaptation from the DDJ scheme to the Gospel
      scheme must thus be allowed for. Further, other documentation precludes the
      idea that (1) and (2) are themselves new ideas in the Gospel world; they are
      ideas previously attested locally. It is thus the articulation and perhaps
      supplementation of those ideas that we may reasonably look to in the W material
      as here defined. Some actual additions may also occur, but need not be
      envisioned as a first expectation.

      Now, then:

      ARONSON 4 (LUKE)

      In the skimmed Aronson list, there were 5 passages that Aronson himself linked
      with Luke. But it turned out on previous inspection that some of the Luke
      passages referenced by Aronson have parallels in Matthew or Mark. We first
      determine if there are differences in these Gospel parallels which allow us to
      choose one of them as the specific Gospel end of the comparison. The results
      are:

      DDJ 7. Mk 8:35 = Mt 16:25 = Lk 9:94 "body is preserved"
      DDJ 16. Mk 13:31 = Mt 24:35 = Lk 21:33 "not pass away"
      DDJ 20. Mk 9:39f = Lk 9:58 "without a home"

      As far as the parallel goes, there is not the slightest textual reason to
      prefer any of these to any other. We now intrude the Trajectory Theory,
      previously stated, according to which the order of the Gospels is

      Mk > Mt > Lk > Jn

      From this it follows that if there IS an input from W into the Gospel
      tradition, that input will in the above three cases have entered at Mk and been
      simply retained in the Mt and Lk stages of the tradition. The result of this
      consideration is to reinstate Mark as the recipient of W input, not indeed at
      the places indicated by Aronson, but at places which he has unnecessarily
      attributed to Luke. We may notice in passing their ascetic and itinerant
      quality.

      We have earlier found that the majority of Aronson parallels in which Matthew
      is the Gospel term have no equivalents in other Gospels, so that this large
      group must be located at the Matthew or second stage of the G tradition; some
      of them are retained in Luke, but that we attribute to the intertia of
      tradition.

      Finally, we are left with two parallels in which Aronson's Luke reference is
      the only Synoptically obvious one. These are:

      DDJ 34. Lk 17:21 "[Dau] everywhere; [kingdom] among you"
      DDJ 46. Lk 12:15 "life is not possessions"

      And we may note, in this subset, which is now the entirety of the Lukan subset
      properly so called, the pronounced tone of implied poverty.

      Next: Matthew.

      Bruce

      E Bruce Brooks
      Warring States Project
      University of Massachusetts at Amhersdt
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