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Re: 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene

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  • dej2_
    Robert Greene had a best seller prior to 33 Strategies of War called 48 Laws of Power . Have you read this book? I almost regret buying it... not that the
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 13, 2006
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      Robert Greene had a best seller prior to "33 Strategies of War"
      called "48 Laws of Power". Have you read this book? I almost regret
      buying it... not that the book is poorly written, on contrary it's
      rather well written. But he is very cynical, very Machiavellian. Here
      are a few of the chapter headings that I found objectionable: Get
      Others to do the Work for You, But Always Take the Credit, Learn to
      Keep People Dependent on You.

      The book would be bad if it concentrated on gaining power against
      your enemies, but the book seems to focus on concentrating on gaining
      power through the unknowing, naive and innocent. The book regularly
      refers to the other party as victims. As distasteful as this book
      is... the book really conveys that the author is really being sincere
      that he is giving you good advice, as psychotic it may be.

      Someone should write a book on how to protecting yourself from this
      type of person. I can only recommend this book for people who wish to
      have a better insight how bad people think. Possibly giving you some
      type of edge in protecting yourself.

      My greatest fear is that the unscrupulous will use the book as their
      bible, only adding and re-enforcing to their own scheming and
      conniving ideas.

      Greene has a new book out called "The Art of Secduction" I hear its a
      dating guide. It's alsmost scary to think of what he published in
      this book.

      --- In Sun_Tzu@yahoogroups.com, gus videos <gusvideos@...> wrote:
      >
      > I picked this book up in the library, so I got a chance to skim
      it. I was impressed. It's quite a huge book. Very thorough with
      each of the types of strategies. Explains each one and gives
      examples of when the strategy was used effectively. I am always wary
      of the stating of specific strategies because a winning strategies
      are very specific to their situation. That being said, this is an
      excellent reference when you need access to a specific and effective
      plan. From the little that I saw in the book, I wouldn't hesitate to
      recommend it.
      >
      > "d.jew@..." <dej2_@...> wrote: Anyone read "33 Strategies
      of War"? I'm thinking about buying this
      > book, but I would like to know if its worth $25 dollars.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Gus Maximus
      > The Art of Gamefare, The art of winning at multiplayer video games
      > Do you know Digital Kung-Fu?
      > http://www.TheArtofGamefare.com
      > gus@...
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail.
      >
    • gus videos
      You bring up a good point Dej. When I finished writing my first draft of The Art of Gamefare: Defeating your Online Gaming Opponent, I discovered two things.
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 13, 2006
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        You bring up a good point Dej.  When I finished writing my first draft of The Art of Gamefare: Defeating your Online Gaming Opponent, I discovered two things.  First, the same principles that are used to win at video games are the same rules to win at everything else.  Second, movie villains and monsters were the ones that used the rules most effectively.  It's almost like I wrote a book about how to be a bad guy!  For example, absorption is the most powerful thing you can do to your opponent.  The most powerful thing you can do to your opponent is turn him into your ally.  When I thought of examples of this, I came up with vampires, werewolves, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and Mr. Smith from the movie "The Matrix."  The first thing Lex Luthor asked Superman before he placed the Krypton necklace around him was if he would consider joining him.  So what was my final impression?  People seeking power are excellent practioners of warfare.
         
        That being said, I also learned another thing.  The ability to win is a skill.  It's a tool, and as a tool it has no will of its own.  Depending on its user, it can be used for either good or bad.  The ability to control other people can be used to either make them rob a bank or quit smoking.  It all depends on its use.
         
        I am sorry that you didn't like Greene's book.  From my cursory look, I liked that it gave concrete examples of how to apply the rules of competition.  My original complaint stands; you can get in trouble when you make the dynamic static.  The battlefield is such a fluid environment, you can't write down specific strategies for it.  It seems in Greene's case, you noticed that his strategies betray a lust for power at other people's expense.  The power to succeed can be used for either good or bad depending on the practitioner.  As for protecting yourself against these types of people, the same rules they use can be used against them.  They too can be controlled and manipulated, but for a good cause.
         
        If you found no value in the book I would recommend you put up for sale on amazon.com or half.com that way it won't be a complete loss.
         
        A strategy book I did buy and enjoy was Greg Gagliardi's The Golden Key to Strategy.  The book's weakness is that I found the underlying structure hard to follow.  There seem no unifying principles to the lessons in the book.  The strength of this book, however, was its ability to provide you with easily digestible examples of how to apply strategy in your everyday life.  Each section is only two pages long.  It's a nice read before going to bed, considering it just takes a few minutes.  Gary has his own website with several other strategy books, all based off of Sun-tzu's The Art of Warfare.  What is nice about his webpage is that you can read or listen to his parts of his book before purchasing.
         
        dej2_ <dej2_@...> wrote:
        Robert Greene had a best seller prior to "33 Strategies of War"
        called "48 Laws of Power". Have you read this book? I almost regret
        buying it... not that the book is poorly written, on contrary it's
        rather well written. But he is very cynical, very Machiavellian. Here
        are a few of the chapter headings that I found objectionable: Get
        Others to do the Work for You, But Always Take the Credit, Learn to
        Keep People Dependent on You.

        The book would be bad if it concentrated on gaining power against
        your enemies, but the book seems to focus on concentrating on gaining
        power through the unknowing, naive and innocent. The book regularly
        refers to the other party as victims. As distasteful as this book
        is... the book really conveys that the author is really being sincere
        that he is giving you good advice, as psychotic it may be.

        Someone should write a book on how to protecting yourself from this
        type of person. I can only recommend this book for people who wish to
        have a better insight how bad people think. Possibly giving you some
        type of edge in protecting yourself.

        My greatest fear is that the unscrupulous will use the book as their
        bible, only adding and re-enforcing to their own scheming and
        conniving ideas.

        Greene has a new book out called "The Art of Secduction" I hear its a
        dating guide. It's alsmost scary to think of what he published in
        this book.

        --- In Sun_Tzu@yahoogroups .com, gus videos <gusvideos@. ..> wrote:
        >
        > I picked this book up in the library, so I got a chance to skim
        it. I was impressed. It's quite a huge book. Very thorough with
        each of the types of strategies. Explains each one and gives
        examples of when the strategy was used effectively. I am always wary
        of the stating of specific strategies because a winning strategies
        are very specific to their situation. That being said, this is an
        excellent reference when you need access to a specific and effective
        plan. From the little that I saw in the book, I wouldn't hesitate to
        recommend it.
        >
        > "d.jew@..." <dej2_@...> wrote: Anyone read "33 Strategies
        of War"? I'm thinking about buying this
        > book, but I would like to know if its worth $25 dollars.
        .




        Gus Maximus
        The Art of Gamefare, The art of winning at multiplayer video games
        Do you know Digital Kung-Fu?
        http://www.TheArtofGamefare.com
        gus@...


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      • Wolfgang
        Gentlemen, I appreciate all the book references you have all cited as I have secured all of them through my local library. In my youth I was an avid student on
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 13, 2006
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          Gentlemen,

          I appreciate all the book references you have all
          cited as I have secured all of them through my local
          library.

          In my youth I was an avid student on strategy and
          military warfare as applied to business. No in my 40s
          it will be interesting reading similar materials and
          see what added insight I gain from them.

          Best regards,

          Wolgang


          --- gus videos <gusvideos@...> wrote:

          > You bring up a good point Dej. When I finished
          > writing my first draft of The Art of Gamefare:
          > Defeating your Online Gaming Opponent, I discovered
          > two things. First, the same principles that are
          > used to win at video games are the same rules to win
          > at everything else. Second, movie villains and
          > monsters were the ones that used the rules most
          > effectively. It's almost like I wrote a book about
          > how to be a bad guy! For example, absorption is the
          > most powerful thing you can do to your opponent.
          > The most powerful thing you can do to your opponent
          > is turn him into your ally. When I thought of
          > examples of this, I came up with vampires,
          > werewolves, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and Mr.
          > Smith from the movie "The Matrix." The first thing
          > Lex Luthor asked Superman before he placed the
          > Krypton necklace around him was if he would consider
          > joining him. So what was my final impression?
          > People seeking power are excellent practioners of
          > warfare.
          >
          > That being said, I also learned another thing.
          > The ability to win is a skill. It's a tool, and as
          > a tool it has no will of its own. Depending on its
          > user, it can be used for either good or bad. The
          > ability to control other people can be used to
          > either make them rob a bank or quit smoking. It all
          > depends on its use.
          >
          > I am sorry that you didn't like Greene's book.
          > From my cursory look, I liked that it gave concrete
          > examples of how to apply the rules of competition.
          > My original complaint stands; you can get in trouble
          > when you make the dynamic static. The battlefield
          > is such a fluid environment, you can't write down
          > specific strategies for it. It seems in Greene's
          > case, you noticed that his strategies betray a lust
          > for power at other people's expense. The power to
          > succeed can be used for either good or bad depending
          > on the practitioner. As for protecting yourself
          > against these types of people, the same rules they
          > use can be used against them. They too can be
          > controlled and manipulated, but for a good cause.
          >
          > If you found no value in the book I would
          > recommend you put up for sale on amazon.com or
          > half.com that way it won't be a complete loss.
          >
          > A strategy book I did buy and enjoy was Greg
          > Gagliardi's The Golden Key to Strategy. The book's
          > weakness is that I found the underlying structure
          > hard to follow. There seem no unifying principles
          > to the lessons in the book. The strength of this
          > book, however, was its ability to provide you with
          > easily digestible examples of how to apply strategy
          > in your everyday life. Each section is only two
          > pages long. It's a nice read before going to bed,
          > considering it just takes a few minutes. Gary has
          > his own website with several other strategy books,
          > all based off of Sun-tzu's The Art of Warfare. What
          > is nice about his webpage is that you can read or
          > listen to his parts of his book before purchasing.
          >
          > http://www.clearbridge.com/the_sun_tzu_system.htm
          >
          >
          > dej2_ <dej2_@...> wrote:
          > Robert Greene had a best seller prior to
          > "33 Strategies of War"
          > called "48 Laws of Power". Have you read this book?
          > I almost regret
          > buying it... not that the book is poorly written, on
          > contrary it's
          > rather well written. But he is very cynical, very
          > Machiavellian. Here
          > are a few of the chapter headings that I found
          > objectionable: Get
          > Others to do the Work for You, But Always Take the
          > Credit, Learn to
          > Keep People Dependent on You.
          >
          > The book would be bad if it concentrated on gaining
          > power against
          > your enemies, but the book seems to focus on
          > concentrating on gaining
          > power through the unknowing, naive and innocent. The
          > book regularly
          > refers to the other party as victims. As distasteful
          > as this book
          > is... the book really conveys that the author is
          > really being sincere
          > that he is giving you good advice, as psychotic it
          > may be.
          >
          > Someone should write a book on how to protecting
          > yourself from this
          > type of person. I can only recommend this book for
          > people who wish to
          > have a better insight how bad people think. Possibly
          > giving you some
          > type of edge in protecting yourself.
          >
          > My greatest fear is that the unscrupulous will use
          > the book as their
          > bible, only adding and re-enforcing to their own
          > scheming and
          > conniving ideas.
          >
          > Greene has a new book out called "The Art of
          > Secduction" I hear its a
          > dating guide. It's alsmost scary to think of what he
          > published in
          > this book.
          >
          > --- In Sun_Tzu@yahoogroups.com, gus videos
          > <gusvideos@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I picked this book up in the library, so I got a
          > chance to skim
          > it. I was impressed. It's quite a huge book. Very
          > thorough with
          > each of the types of strategies. Explains each one
          > and gives
          > examples of when the strategy was used effectively.
          > I am always wary
          > of the stating of specific strategies because a
          > winning strategies
          > are very specific to their situation. That being
          > said, this is an
          > excellent reference when you need access to a
          > specific and effective
          > plan. From the little that I saw in the book, I
          > wouldn't hesitate to
          > recommend it.
          > >
          > > "d.jew@..." <dej2_@...> wrote: Anyone read "33
          > Strategies
          > of War"? I'm thinking about buying this
          > > book, but I would like to know if its worth $25
          > dollars.
          >
          >
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          > Do you know Digital Kung-Fu?
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          > ---------------------------------
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