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Using LaTeX in SubEtha

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  • jug.florian
    Hi *, I am currently trying hard to switch from TexShop to SubEthaEdit for my scientific writing. I would love to explain you a bit about the work-flow I ve
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 14, 2011
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      Hi *,

      I am currently trying hard to switch from TexShop to SubEthaEdit for my scientific writing.
      I would love to explain you a bit about the work-flow I've set up so far and would like to get your feedback on "how stupid I've made several things" in case I've done so.

      I write in SubEthaEdit - surprise. Using a little 2-liner script I am polling the folder all my .tex files are inside and if any of them get changed I call typeset everything again and open the newly created PDF using Skim. Just in case anybody is interested in the script I use to poll the folder:
      latexmk -pvc -pdf -e '$pdflatex=q/pdflatex --synctex=1 %O %S/;
      $pdf_previewer=q/open -a Skim %S/' $1

      In Skim I use the 'see' command line tool to be able to go back to SubEtha directly finding the piece of text I am interested in. It works almost fine... unfortunately I experience some bugs when I use \input and the TeX code is distributed over several files.

      Currently I struggle a bit with the other direction: so how can I go from SubEtha and jump to the corresponding point in the PDF???

      In total I have 3 Questions:
      (1) Does anybody know any workarounds for the bug I've shortly mentioned? Who has experience similar problems?
      (2) Who knows a good way to go forwards from SubEtha to PDF
      (3) Does anybody know any further tricks you think are helpful when TeXing with SubEtha?

      Thanks,
      Florian

      PS: the reason why I do not use the typeset button that comes with SubEtha is mainly that I get ZERO feedback in case typesetting causes errors.
    • Michael
      ... This is not the whole story. The LaTeX mode is customizable, so you can change how the document is compiled. This lets you pipe the output of the
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 13, 2011
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        --- In SubEthaEdit@yahoogroups.com, "jug.florian" <florian.jug@...> wrote:

        > In total I have 3 Questions:
        > [...]
        > (2) Who knows a good way to go forwards from SubEtha to PDF
        > (3) Does anybody know any further tricks you think are helpful when TeXing with SubEtha?
        >
        > [...]
        >
        > PS: the reason why I do not use the typeset button that comes with SubEtha is mainly that I get ZERO feedback in case typesetting causes errors.
        >

        This is not the whole story. The LaTeX mode is customizable, so you can change how the document is compiled. This lets you pipe the output of the typesetter (which you can choose) to another program for viewing the output. There's a description of how to show the output from latexmk in a SEE window at <http://appliedabstraction.blogspot.com/search/label/SEEing%20LaTeX>.

        That said, I make no recommendation that you actually should take that approach. Personally, I've come around to using latexmk -pvc in a Terminal window to continuously compile and update the preview, much like you're doing.

        My main use of LaTeX is also scientific writing. Scientific writing is a significant task, so my main trick is to treat it like any other significant *programmatic* task -- keep it under version control, use a makefile for the entire project, and automate what I can using shell scripts. With this approach, I'll always have Terminal around anyway, so keeping latexmk -pvc going is pretty natural.

        You can save key scripts with a .command ending, which lets you double-click them in the Finder to run them. One nice use of this is to launch latexmk. Another is to open up the currently relevant documents for the paper as tabs in SEE, or another application, depending on the type of document.

        Hope that helps.
        Michael
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