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Re: [Stonehaven] Question Regarding 'Register of Testaments 1715-1800

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  • Tony MacCulloch
    Thanks Ian, I will look it up - would the Tifty Burn power a Grain Mill perhaps ? Thanks for the different spelling of Bodiechell. Cheers, Brenda ... Brenda,
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 5, 2005
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      Thanks Ian,

      I will look it up - would the Tifty Burn power a Grain Mill
      perhaps ? Thanks for the different spelling of Bodiechell.

      Cheers,
      Brenda


      ---Original Message---

      Brenda,

      There are two farms near Fyvie with the right sort of name,
      both close to NJ 785 435 (Uk national grid ref). The Tifty
      Burn runs through the area.

      The spelling slightly different now at Bodiechell

      Ian Davies
      5 3 5
    • Ray Hennessy
      Hi Brenda, Ian may have misled you. Nothing about place-names is unusual in Aberdeenshire - the most unlikely names recur all over the place. There is a farm
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 5, 2005
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        Hi Brenda,

        Ian may have misled you. Nothing about place-names is unusual
        in Aberdeenshire - the most unlikely names recur all over the
        place.

        There is a farm called Mains of Bodychell and a ferm toun
        called Bodychell in Pitsligo parish on the border with Tyrie,
        alongside the Water of Tyrie burn. It may or may not be your
        Bodichell - spelling varies a lot over the centuries.

        The grid references are NJ950628 and NJ955628, respectively.

        If you want to see their location go to:

        http://tinyurl.com/5z6we

        The circle shows Bodychell; Mains is just to the west of it
        at the end of the lane but not named.

        If you look further west along the Water of Tyrie there is
        a place called Tyrie Mains. On the 1896 map that is shown
        as a Mill.

        The Mill in this case would have been a water mill for grain.
        One of the curiosities of the mills in Aberdeenshire was that
        a condition of tenancy [and sub-tenancy which was common]
        often required a crofter or tenant farmer to use a particular
        mill. This would have been owned by the land-owner or
        principal tenant and he would get a cut of the proceeds. So
        the guy at the bottom of the land-using pile would have to
        give the miller a proportion of his flour/grain and another
        proportion to his landlord & sometimes a tithe to the church.
        He could end up with only about 70% of his produce.

        We have heard of one sub-tenant who had to cart his grain 15
        miles to the designated mill, passing two or three other
        mills on the way. But, hey, who said life had to be fair?

        There were lots of other mills in Aberdeenshire. The ones
        scattered around the countryside were usually for grain but
        some of the towns had woollen mills. New Pitsligo - a new
        township - seems to have had a big weaving and clothing
        industry late in the 19th century judging by the number of
        our relatives who migrated there & took up various associated
        trades. It sounds rather like sweat-shops.

        There were also many mills in the Denburn area of N. W.
        Aberdeen which, I think, did similar things. You may have to
        ask the Aberdeen List for details if you are really interested.
        I've only picked up bits & pieces from the Exchange Lists, so
        no authority!

        There may be other Bodichell/Bodychell/Bodiechell, etc places
        in Aberdeenshire but GENUKI only shows the one in Fyvie and
        the one in Pitsligo.

        Good luck & Best wishes,
        Ray Hennessy


        ---Original Message---

        Brenda,

        From slender evidence, Mid Bodichell seems to be a farm
        somewhere near Fyvie in Aberdeenshire. Bodichell is an
        unusual name, and I would be extremely surprised if there
        is another place with the same name.

        Mill of Bodichell would most probably have been a grain mill.

        There is a common phrase "last will and testament" meaning
        the document describing how a person wants his property
        disposed of when he dies. The register of testaments may
        well be a collection of wills.

        Ian Davies
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