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Re: [Stonehaven] Info For Researchers Of Sherret / Seirrat

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  • Janet
    Veeery interesting! I m glad you have shared this information with us. What made you think that the Seirrat brothers were immigrants and where from? I am
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 22, 2005
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      Veeery interesting! I'm glad you have shared this information
      with us. What made you think that the Seirrat brothers were
      immigrants and where from?

      I am sure that during my searches I have seen the name spelled
      as Sherret for a marriage with Croll. We all know of course
      that the spelling of a name is the interpretation of the Census
      convener, or Clerk. I can well imagine that we have members
      here who think that their ancestors are Scottish when I and
      others may have been told, because of their research that this
      is not so. The truth must prevail.

      In my line, the Fordoun family connection is established in the
      name of Sheret, or Sherret. When they found their way to England
      however it appears as Sherratt. Were they Norman and did they
      "invade" Scotland I am certainly interested in knowing more
      about this line. The earliest spelling I have is Shirit in 1715
      in Herefordshire.

      I see that in your mail you have the name as "Sirit"; this is
      precisely what happens and far from it being an acknowledged
      error, it is the way it would have been written in the official
      records.

      Janet
    • sauchieburn
      Janet, I meant that I thought it possible that the Seirrat brothers were migrants rather than immigrants. My reason for thinking is that there were too few of
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 28, 2005
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        Janet,

        I meant that I thought it possible that the Seirrat brothers
        were migrants rather than immigrants. My reason for thinking
        is that there were too few of this name around the Mearns
        before ca. 1740 to indicate that it was an indigenous surname.

        Black's Surnames of Scotland is considered by many to be the
        oracle and he thinks the name came from England, possibly
        Notts. and possibly the same as Sherwood. I have found that
        Black jumps at every opportunity to make a connection with
        Norman names, but in this case he does not do so.

        His contention is that the surname derives from Sherwood
        forest. Quite possibly this placename would pre-date the
        Norman immigrations.

        Alan


        ---Original Message---

        Veeery interesting! I'm glad you have shared this information
        with us. What made you think that the Seirrat brothers were
        immigrants and where from?

        I am sure that during my searches I have seen the name spelled
        as Sherret for a marriage with Croll. We all know of course
        that the spelling of a name is the interpretation of the Census
        convener, or Clerk. I can well imagine that we have members
        here who think that their ancestors are Scottish when I and
        others may have been told, because of their research that this
        is not so. The truth must prevail.

        In my line, the Fordoun family connection is established in the
        name of Sheret, or Sherret. When they found their way to England
        however it appears as Sherratt. Were they Norman and did they
        "invade" Scotland I am certainly interested in knowing more
        about this line. The earliest spelling I have is Shirit in 1715
        in Herefordshire.

        I see that in your mail you have the name as "Sirit"; this is
        precisely what happens and far from it being an acknowledged
        error, it is the way it would have been written in the official
        records.

        Janet
      • Janet
        Alan, In recent weeks I suffered a major computer incident when my HD died. As usual I had backed up but not sufficiently, when it took place. I lost some more
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 1, 2005
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          Alan,

          In recent weeks I suffered a major computer incident when my
          HD died. As usual I had backed up but not sufficiently, when
          it took place. I lost some more recent mails. One of those
          mails is from someone in a genealogy group who referred to
          G.F.Black's book of Scottish Surnames who referred to Sherret
          as being Scots in origin.

          I may have mentioned earlier that it has been put to me that
          because we find more Sheret - and all its variant spellings
          - in earlier times in England, they must have been English.
          It may have been stated here that these Scots farmers who
          found their way to Herefordshire, had only the clothing they
          stood up in. What interests me is a reminder of the Act of
          Settlement 1701, legislation in place to support The Poor
          Law. To enable each parish to look after their own poor, a
          poor rate was collected. The 'impotent poor' would be given
          relief the able-bodied poor would be put to work and the
          vagabonds would be punished and sent on their way. Why then
          were they not sent packing one wonders under Act of Settlement
          legislation, and how did they become tenant farmers; probably
          because they originated in that region? We'll probably never
          know. What is puzzling is that the roads in Herefordshire
          were very poor, even so there is also evidence of their going
          backward and forward to Scotland.

          Janet


          ---Original Message---

          Janet,

          I meant that I thought it possible that the Seirrat brothers
          were migrants rather than immigrants. My reason for thinking
          is that there were too few of this name around the Mearns
          before ca. 1740 to indicate that it was an indigenous surname.

          Black's Surnames of Scotland is considered by many to be the
          oracle and he thinks the name came from England, possibly
          Notts. and possibly the same as Sherwood. I have found that
          Black jumps at every opportunity to make a connection with
          Norman names, but in this case he does not do so.

          His contention is that the surname derives from Sherwood
          forest. Quite possibly this placename would pre-date the
          Norman immigrations.
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