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Napoleon & the Baynes from Balloch near Crieff, Perthshire

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  • Tony MacCulloch
    Hi everyone, Is this true ?? Cheers, Brenda http://www.telegraph.co.uk/htmlContent.jhtml?html=/archive/1999/02/22/wnap22.html ISSUE 1368 Monday 22 February
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 9, 2004
      Hi everyone,

      Is this true ??

      Cheers,
      Brenda


      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/htmlContent.jhtml?html=/archive/1999/02/22/wnap22.html

      ISSUE 1368
      Monday 22 February 1999

      Napoleon was one of us, says Scottish archive
      By Richard Savill

      THE family of Napoleon Bonaparte may have come from a tiny Scottish
      community, according to new research.

      Evidence that his grandfather came from Balloch, near Crieff, Perthshire,
      has been uncovered by a local historian, Robert Torrens.

      Napoleon: Highland blood?

      Mr Torrens has now embarked on a detailed investigation to try to prove a
      link between the French emperor and an 18th century labourer, William Bayne.
      He believes that Napoleon's grandfather may have been a soldier.

      Mr Torrens stumbled across the link in a dusty book called Crieff: Its
      Traditions and Characters. He said: "The book dates from 1881 and carries a
      story claiming that Napoleon was really a third generation Scot. The archive
      "was highly thought of at the time and the story was vouched for by some
      respected figures."

      Mr Torrens said that, according to the book, a labourer named Bayne and his
      family decided to leave Balloch shortly after the collapse of the 1745
      Jacobite uprising.

      It says: "Having had a strong leaning to the Duke of Perth and Prince
      Charlie after '45, Bayne resolved to seek a home in another land. With this
      intent he and his family and others set sail. A storm came on and they were
      driven on to Corsica, where they were hospitably received. They were known
      as Bayne or Buon and his party. In course of time his sons were called
      Buon-de-party.

      "His grandson was named Buon-de-parte or Buonaparte and now figures in the
      history of the world as the great Napoleon."

      Mr Torrens said that no descendants of the Baynes were left in Balloch, so
      the archive's claims were difficult to verify.

      He said: "It is an intriguing story and it would be nice if it could be
      marked in the village in some way."

      Perthshire Tourist Board said it was keen to adopt Napoleon as part of the
      area's historical attraction if the claim could be substantiated.
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