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Re: SV80L first light tonight

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  • echan1127
    Jim, I got #76 so your guess doesn t seem far off. Although expensive, the SV80L truly fills a niche market for us visual observers. One thing I ve been
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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      Jim, I got #76 so your guess doesn't seem far off. Although
      expensive, the SV80L truly fills a niche market for us visual
      observers.

      One thing I've been confused about. My scope has a LOMO objective
      made presumably with OK4 super ED glass. Was there a time that the
      80L's were made using fluorite? I know WO called their F6 a
      fluorite triplet. Perhaps it was FPL53? I'm confused.

      One thing I'm not confused about and that's the truly STELLAR
      performance mine is giving.

      You're in Redlands (I'm in Pasadena), perhaps I can join the SV
      group next time you guys meet at Joshua Tree.

      -Evan

      --- In Stellarvue@yahoogroups.com, k75jim@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > Sadly, it's true. With the intro of the SV90T, the 80L was
      deemed likely to
      > compete with it -- not smart from a business sense. But the 90T
      is really,
      > REALLY sweet -- and only $200 more than the 80L. However, the
      80L will, I
      > think, become a collectors prize. I believe less than 100 were
      made; probably
      > less than 80?
      >
      > I know I'm not parting with mine!
      >
      > Clear, dark skies,
      >
      > Jim S.
      > Redlands, CA
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Jim Carpenter
      The saga continues...survival of the fittest is the rule in the SV lineup. The SV85S, a fine 85mm doublet apo, was discontinued after the introduction of the
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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        The saga continues...survival of the fittest is the rule in the SV
        lineup. The SV85S, a fine 85mm doublet apo, was discontinued after
        the introduction of the SV80S and SV80L. The 85S, at f6.9, fell right
        between the two triplets in focal length. Business-wise, it made no
        sense to continue the doublet when a few dollars more bought a
        color-free triplet of such close aperture. (The 85S does show a tiny
        hint of color on Vega, but you have to try real hard to see it.)
        Fewer than 100 of these were made -- actually more like 70-something
        -- so they're also in short supply, now available only on the used
        market. It should be noted that the 85S is no slouch as an AP
        platform, as Dave W's current work shows and Steven Pitt's film images
        of a few years back.

        Jim C
        Denver

        --- In Stellarvue@yahoogroups.com, k75jim@... wrote:
        >
        > Evan,
        >
        > Sadly, it's true. With the intro of the SV90T, the 80L was deemed
        likely to
        > compete with it -- not smart from a business sense. But the 90T is
        really,
        > REALLY sweet -- and only $200 more than the 80L. However, the 80L
        will, I
        > think, become a collectors prize. I believe less than 100 were
        made; probably
        > less than 80?
        >
        > I know I'm not parting with mine!
        >
        > Clear, dark skies,
        >
        > Jim S.
        > Redlands, CA
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • k75jim@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/1/2006 00:02:52 Pacific Daylight Time, echan1127@yahoo.com writes: Evan, One thing I ve been confused about. My scope has a LOMO
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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          In a message dated 6/1/2006 00:02:52 Pacific Daylight Time,
          echan1127@... writes:

          Evan,

          One thing I've been confused about. My scope has a LOMO objective
          made presumably with OK4 super ED glass. Was there a time that the
          80L's were made using fluorite? I know WO called their F6 a
          fluorite triplet. Perhaps it was FPL53? I'm confused.
          Vic should probably answer this but... as I understand things, the 80L uses
          Russian made Super ED. With regard to the other, there's fluorite and then
          there's Fluorite. Not all glass that is called "fluorite" is the same as a
          comparative look through different instruments will show. Dave P. christened
          the glass used in the SV80L as "magic glass." I think he got it right!

          You're in Redlands (I'm in Pasadena), perhaps I can join the SV
          group next time you guys meet at Joshua Tree.


          I hope so. The next non-official gourmet astonomy gathering is (maybe)
          scheduled for the New Moon in October of this year. Naturally we'll be posting
          about it. After it cools off a bit in the fall we might call for a weekend
          before then. Just watch for the posts.

          Clear, dark skies,

          Jim S.
          Redlands, CA


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • rfurborough
          Now, this has me somewhat concerned...... The SV80L I believed is a Flourite scope, infact I had the SV80L on my wish list until I read it was to be
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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            Now, this has me somewhat concerned......

            The SV80L I believed is a Flourite 'scope, infact I had the SV80L on
            my 'wish list' until I read it was to be discontinued and replaced by
            the SV90T. That prompted me to commit to purchasing the SV80L as my
            first apo grade refractor today to secure one without trying to get
            one used at a later date as so few have been produced.

            I have reviewed the specs and although it is said to be triplet apo,
            nowhere in the description does it say flourite. The replacement for
            the SV80L, the SV90T specifically states it as being a flourite
            triplet apo refractor and from this I can only assume the SV80L is
            not a flourite refractor.

            Maybe I should have paid an extra $200 and waited for the SV90T
            flourite apo, but then again, there are many SV80L owners who are
            extremely pleased with the views the SV80L produces, I hope I am one
            of them. But you just cannot help but wonder if you did the right
            thing!!!

            Bob



            --- In Stellarvue@yahoogroups.com, k75jim@... wrote:
            >
            > In a message dated 6/1/2006 00:02:52 Pacific Daylight Time,
            > echan1127@... writes:
            >
            > Evan,
            >
            > One thing I've been confused about. My scope has a LOMO objective
            > made presumably with OK4 super ED glass. Was there a time that
            the
            > 80L's were made using fluorite? I know WO called their F6 a
            > fluorite triplet. Perhaps it was FPL53? I'm confused.
            > Vic should probably answer this but... as I understand things, the
            80L uses
            > Russian made Super ED. With regard to the other, there's fluorite
            and then
            > there's Fluorite. Not all glass that is called "fluorite" is the
            same as a
            > comparative look through different instruments will show. Dave P.
            christened
            > the glass used in the SV80L as "magic glass." I think he got it
            right!
            >
            > You're in Redlands (I'm in Pasadena), perhaps I can join the SV
            > group next time you guys meet at Joshua Tree.
            >
            >
            > I hope so. The next non-official gourmet astonomy gathering is
            (maybe)
            > scheduled for the New Moon in October of this year. Naturally
            we'll be posting
            > about it. After it cools off a bit in the fall we might call for
            a weekend
            > before then. Just watch for the posts.
            >
            > Clear, dark skies,
            >
            > Jim S.
            > Redlands, CA
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Rich Wood
            Unless a scope specifically states that it is a Fluorite design then it is pretty definitely not. In fact I believe that some scopes have used the Fluorite
            Message 5 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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              Unless a scope specifically states that it is a Fluorite design then
              it is pretty definitely not. In fact I believe that some scopes have
              used the Fluorite claim for ED glass designs using FPL 53 or a similar
              glass, IMO a major marketing misrepresentation. This has been listed
              as "Fluorite based glass" or other marketing BS.

              Remember though that some outstanding lenses have been designed
              without Fluorite and some not so good ones with it. It all depends on
              the talents of the designer and the fabricator as a good design can be
              ruined by poor fabrication and a mediocre design improved in
              fabrication via aspherizing or other techniques.

              Clark lenses in general were relatively poor designs per modern
              optical theory but via star testing and other optical fabrication and
              testing techniques they were manufactured to be much better than the
              basic designs would indicate. They also used optical glasses that
              would be considered unacceptable quality today but again corrected for
              glass deficiencies with their optical workmanship and testing.

              Rich Wood


              --- In Stellarvue@yahoogroups.com, "rfurborough" <r.furborough@...> wrote:
              >
              > Now, this has me somewhat concerned......
              >
              > The SV80L I believed is a Flourite 'scope, infact I had the SV80L on
              > my 'wish list' until I read it was to be discontinued and replaced by
              > the SV90T. That prompted me to commit to purchasing the SV80L as my
              > first apo grade refractor today to secure one without trying to get
              > one used at a later date as so few have been produced.
              >
              > I have reviewed the specs and although it is said to be triplet apo,
              > nowhere in the description does it say flourite. The replacement for
              > the SV80L, the SV90T specifically states it as being a flourite
              > triplet apo refractor and from this I can only assume the SV80L is
              > not a flourite refractor.
              >
              > Maybe I should have paid an extra $200 and waited for the SV90T
              > flourite apo, but then again, there are many SV80L owners who are
              > extremely pleased with the views the SV80L produces, I hope I am one
              > of them. But you just cannot help but wonder if you did the right
              > thing!!!
              >
              > Bob
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Stellarvue@yahoogroups.com, k75jim@ wrote:
              > >
              > > In a message dated 6/1/2006 00:02:52 Pacific Daylight Time,
              > > echan1127@ writes:
              > >
              > > Evan,
              > >
              > > One thing I've been confused about. My scope has a LOMO objective
              > > made presumably with OK4 super ED glass. Was there a time that
              > the
              > > 80L's were made using fluorite? I know WO called their F6 a
              > > fluorite triplet. Perhaps it was FPL53? I'm confused.
              > > Vic should probably answer this but... as I understand things, the
              > 80L uses
              > > Russian made Super ED. With regard to the other, there's fluorite
              > and then
              > > there's Fluorite. Not all glass that is called "fluorite" is the
              > same as a
              > > comparative look through different instruments will show. Dave P.
              > christened
              > > the glass used in the SV80L as "magic glass." I think he got it
              > right!
              > >
              > > You're in Redlands (I'm in Pasadena), perhaps I can join the SV
              > > group next time you guys meet at Joshua Tree.
              > >
              > >
              > > I hope so. The next non-official gourmet astonomy gathering is
              > (maybe)
              > > scheduled for the New Moon in October of this year. Naturally
              > we'll be posting
              > > about it. After it cools off a bit in the fall we might call for
              > a weekend
              > > before then. Just watch for the posts.
              > >
              > > Clear, dark skies,
              > >
              > > Jim S.
              > > Redlands, CA
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • pseacraft
              To add to what Rich stated, all of the SV APOs use Russian OK4 super ED glass. If you weasel your way through the yucky yahoo search function looking for
              Message 6 of 17 , Jun 1, 2006
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                To add to what Rich stated, all of the SV APOs use Russian OK4 "super
                ED" glass. If you weasel your way through the yucky yahoo search
                function looking for OK4 you will see numerous posting bys Vic to this
                fact. The one of 28 April 06 is informative as are 04 and 25 December
                05. The 90T is using something different and I beleive it is true
                fluorite. As Rich said, numerous distributors and "manufactuers" are
                misrepresenting the glass that they are presenting as fluorite when in
                fact it is OK4, FPL-53, etc.

                I think it's important to remember that the glass elements are only
                part of the system, the execution of the design is what makes or
                breaks a telescope.

                Eric
              • rpbrpbrpb1@aol.com
                In a message dated 6/2/2006 10:33:27 AM Central Daylight Time, vic@stellarvue.com writes: I have covered this before but this does give me a good opportunity
                Message 7 of 17 , Jun 2, 2006
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                  In a message dated 6/2/2006 10:33:27 AM Central Daylight Time,
                  vic@... writes:

                  I have covered this before but this does give me a good opportunity
                  to cover it again so thanks for bringing it up.
                  ________________________________________________________________
                  I can't help but comment on this kind of attitude. It's rare and reflects a
                  commitment to education. Other companies don't seem to want any more "fluorite"
                  product talk. I finally understand the product marketing and the real issues
                  involved. Thanks for explaining it clearly.

                  Rob


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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