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French-British Joy in Southern England

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  • sumangali_m
    Do you see the face? I ask, I always think the moon appears to be singing very soulfully. Yes, and it seems to be a he. Some say it s a she. Some see
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2004
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      "Do you see the face?" I ask, "I always think the moon appears to be
      singing very soulfully."

      "Yes, and it seems to be a 'he.' Some say it's a 'she.' Some see a
      rabbit."

      "Don't show me the rabbit!" I reply.
      "I might not see the face anymore!"

      The moon hangs as a polished bronze disc on our journey east.

      "Have you ever seen it look quite like that though?" I ask.

      "No," they both reply.

      One theory is pollution; another city lights. Auspicious augury?
      Yes, we all agree.


      We arrive to silent meditation, followed by a dynamic Soul Bird
      Dream Songs performance of Sri Chinmoy's recent English songs. A
      hilarious play then delights us all: spiritual teaching deeply
      nested in the mischief of British humour. We are soon held captive
      by the joy of Sanjaya's videos in a magical sequence of European
      trips.

      A session of bhajans (devotional songs) rounds off the programme.
      These sessions always seem pitifully short to me! I smile and sing,
      surrounded by the warm glow of instrumental sound. Entering the
      blissful, musical mantra, I never want to leave! It's been a long
      day though, and I appreciate the hospitality of this civilised
      country conference centre.


      We meet at 6 a.m. for meditation, followed by two singing
      performances. First is Udasina's group, and then Fran's group
      singing Sri Chinmoy's devotional English songs with such soft
      sweetness.

      Sanjaya brings August Celebrations back before our eyes on video.
      Especially fascinating is a behind the scenes documentary of the
      record-breaking 101,000-rose bouquet for Sri Chinmoy's birthday.
      Such a complex and delicate operation! Circular saws and lateral
      ladders played surprisingly significant roles. Pavitrata offers a
      very beautiful laminated collage for prasad, even translated into
      French for our Continental guests. (You can see it in his glorious
      gallery album.)


      If I were you, I would not let a successful hill-climbing cyclist
      measure out your two-mile race route. Richard, had I the energy left
      at the end of that one-mile hill I would have shaken my fist very
      menacingly at you :-) This out and back, down and up route has now
      faded to seem just an invigorating start to the day. I have Bithika
      to thank for not allowing me to give up, even when walking would
      have been quicker. First prize: a pineapple, second: a mango, third:
      an apple. Needless to say, no small enough fruit has yet been
      cultivated to represent my position in the race.

      After breakfast we journey through an autumnal kaleidoscope to the
      country residence of Benjamin Disraeli (Prime Minister during Queen
      Victoria's reign). This unusual red brick manor wears ornate gables
      and clusters of towering chimneys, and nestles amongst grand
      monkey-puzzles and firs.

      There is a distinctly female monopoly on the pool table before lunch
      (and for the duration of our stay in fact).*

      Our closing meditation is followed by a French vocal and
      instrumental performance, including a soulful rendition of one of my
      favourite songs by Sri Chinmoy: "Tomar Adesh Shunbo." A newly formed
      female instrumental group of London-based musicians delights us all
      with their debut. Ananda ends the musical programme with some
      favourite arrangements, as well as some new ones. Finally we read
      out some of Sri Chinmoy's new prayers from Niagara Falls and Ongkar
      gives us a first-hand account of the Canadian trip.

      Thanks Bristol Centre for a weekend of perfection!

      Sumangali
      :oD




      *I sincerely hope that no one's thumbs were broken. ;-)
      -Assistant Moderator
    • sumangali_m
      Thumbs, windows and baize all remained in tact in fact, dear A.M. I must say in defence that there are some very talented British female pool players in the
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 2, 2004
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        Thumbs, windows and baize all remained in tact in fact, dear A.M. I
        must say in defence that there are some very talented British female
        pool players in the Centre. I am not one of them, but I managed not
        to put anyone in hospital (not this time at least) :-)

        Sumangali
        :oD
        (a poor fool at pool)


        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sumangali_m
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        >
        > "Do you see the face?" I ask, "I always think the moon appears to be
        > singing very soulfully."
        >
        > "Yes, and it seems to be a 'he.' Some say it's a 'she.' Some see a
        > rabbit."
        >
        > "Don't show me the rabbit!" I reply.
        > "I might not see the face anymore!"
        >
        > The moon hangs as a polished bronze disc on our journey east.
        >
        > "Have you ever seen it look quite like that though?" I ask.
        >
        > "No," they both reply.
        >
        > One theory is pollution; another city lights. Auspicious augury?
        > Yes, we all agree.
        >
        >
        > We arrive to silent meditation, followed by a dynamic Soul Bird
        > Dream Songs performance of Sri Chinmoy's recent English songs. A
        > hilarious play then delights us all: spiritual teaching deeply
        > nested in the mischief of British humour. We are soon held captive
        > by the joy of Sanjaya's videos in a magical sequence of European
        > trips.
        >
        > A session of bhajans (devotional songs) rounds off the programme.
        > These sessions always seem pitifully short to me! I smile and sing,
        > surrounded by the warm glow of instrumental sound. Entering the
        > blissful, musical mantra, I never want to leave! It's been a long
        > day though, and I appreciate the hospitality of this civilised
        > country conference centre.
        >
        >
        > We meet at 6 a.m. for meditation, followed by two singing
        > performances. First is Udasina's group, and then Fran's group
        > singing Sri Chinmoy's devotional English songs with such soft
        > sweetness.
        >
        > Sanjaya brings August Celebrations back before our eyes on video.
        > Especially fascinating is a behind the scenes documentary of the
        > record-breaking 101,000-rose bouquet for Sri Chinmoy's birthday.
        > Such a complex and delicate operation! Circular saws and lateral
        > ladders played surprisingly significant roles. Pavitrata offers a
        > very beautiful laminated collage for prasad, even translated into
        > French for our Continental guests. (You can see it in his glorious
        > gallery album.)
        >
        >
        > If I were you, I would not let a successful hill-climbing cyclist
        > measure out your two-mile race route. Richard, had I the energy left
        > at the end of that one-mile hill I would have shaken my fist very
        > menacingly at you :-) This out and back, down and up route has now
        > faded to seem just an invigorating start to the day. I have Bithika
        > to thank for not allowing me to give up, even when walking would
        > have been quicker. First prize: a pineapple, second: a mango, third:
        > an apple. Needless to say, no small enough fruit has yet been
        > cultivated to represent my position in the race.
        >
        > After breakfast we journey through an autumnal kaleidoscope to the
        > country residence of Benjamin Disraeli (Prime Minister during Queen
        > Victoria's reign). This unusual red brick manor wears ornate gables
        > and clusters of towering chimneys, and nestles amongst grand
        > monkey-puzzles and firs.
        >
        > There is a distinctly female monopoly on the pool table before lunch
        > (and for the duration of our stay in fact).*
        >
        > Our closing meditation is followed by a French vocal and
        > instrumental performance, including a soulful rendition of one of my
        > favourite songs by Sri Chinmoy: "Tomar Adesh Shunbo." A newly formed
        > female instrumental group of London-based musicians delights us all
        > with their debut. Ananda ends the musical programme with some
        > favourite arrangements, as well as some new ones. Finally we read
        > out some of Sri Chinmoy's new prayers from Niagara Falls and Ongkar
        > gives us a first-hand account of the Canadian trip.
        >
        > Thanks Bristol Centre for a weekend of perfection!
        >
        > Sumangali
        > :oD
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > *I sincerely hope that no one's thumbs were broken. ;-)
        > -Assistant Moderator
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