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Bhagavad Gita

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  • natabara7
    Right now I am reading the Mahabharata, as I like to do every couple of years. I just read the chapters that contain the Bhagavad Gita, and I thought I would
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 4, 2003
      Right now I am reading the Mahabharata, as I like to do every couple of years. I just
      read the chapters that contain the Bhagavad Gita, and I thought I would chronicle a
      bit of the interesting commentary by Sri Chinmoy on the subject. -Natabara

      (Chapter 8)

      Krishna says that there are a thousand ages in one day of Brahman and another
      thousand ages in one night of Brahman. During the day all manifested things come
      forth from the Brahman and at night they merge back into the Brahman. Krishna goes
      on to explain that the Brahman is also not the highest state. He says, "there is yet
      another Unmanifested Eternal Being who does not perish even when all existences
      perish. This Supreme Status is My Truth absolute. Only through unswerving devotion
      can one reach this state." (8.17-22)

      Sri Chinmoy says:

      "The easiest and the most effective way to go up high, higher, highest is to surcharge
      oneself with pure love and genuine devotion. Doubt, fear, frustration, limitation and
      imperfection are bound to surrender to devoted love and surrendered devotion.
      Love and devotion have the power unparalleled to own the world and be owned by the
      world. Love God's manifestation; you will find that the cosmic creation is yours.
      Devote yourself to the cause of the cosmic manifestation; you will see that it loves
      you and claims you as its very own."


      This can be found at http://www.aspiringindia.org
    • bhuvah_nz
      For one who has controlled the mind, it is the best of friends, but for one who has failed to do so, it remains the greatest enemy. From the Bhagavad Gita
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 9, 2003
        "For one who has controlled the mind,
        it is the best of friends,
        but for one who has failed to do so,
        it remains the greatest enemy."
        From the Bhagavad Gita
        Chapter 6, verse 6

        And from "Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita" by Sri Chinmoy...

        "Manushyanam sahasresu...." — "Among thousands of men scarcely one
        strives for spiritual perfection, and of those who strive and succeed
        scarcely one knows me in essence." Sri Krishna

        It seems that the third verse is throwing cold water on the seeker.
        But Krishna's intention is anything but that. Krishna is not only
        all-Wisdom, but also all-Compassion. He wants to tell Arjuna what
        actually takes place in the spiritual marathon race. Not for him the
        Knowledge Supreme, to be sure, who owns childish curiosity, shallow
        enthusiasm, weak determination, flickering devotion and conditional
        surrender. Any of these undivine qualities will, without fail, fail
        the inner runner.

        The sixth and seventh verses describe the relation that exists between
        Sri Krishna and the universe. "I am the beginning and the end of the
        universe. I am the Source of creation and I am the place of
        Dissolution. Beyond Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon Me
        as pearls on a string."

        When we concentrate on "All this is woven unto Me like gems into a
        necklace," we immediately vision the peerless poet Krishna.

        To read interesting tales from the Mahabharata you may wish to visit
        http://www.srichinmoy.org/html/library/stories/mahabharata/index.html
      • natabara7
        I grew up in the Catholic Church, was an altar boy, later went to university and studied religion and philosophy, and I have always been fascinated with the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 9, 2003
          I grew up in the Catholic Church, was an altar boy, later went to
          university and studied religion and philosophy, and I have always
          been fascinated with the correlations between religions and faiths.
          When I first read the Bhagavad Gita and came across Krishna's
          utterance to Arjuna:

          "I am the beginning and the end of the universe. I am the
          Source of creation and I am the place of Dissolution. Beyond
          Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon Me as pearls
          on a string." -- Bhagavad Gita (5000 BC)

          I couldn't help but think of the famous biblical quote(s):

          "I am the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the Ending,
          says the Lord, who is and who was and who is to come, the
          Almighty." (Rev 1:7-8)
          "I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the Ending,
          the First and the Last." (Rev 22:13)

          Some time ago a group of us visited the Self Realization Fellowship
          ashram in Encinitas, California, founded by Paramahansa Yogananda
          (in 1937) who was also intrigued by the mystical correlations of
          Hinduism and Christianity.

          It was a beautiful and warm visit -- the grounds are perched on
          cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and the people there were
          extremely nice. It also fascinates me how holy places inspire one's
          thoughts toward higher realms and principles.

          At the time I was reading two books titled "My Religion" and "The
          Message-Light of the Bhagavad Gita" (found at
          http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com), reflecting upon the deeper
          common foundation of all faiths. Right now I am wrapped up in
          reading the Mahabharata, having just finished the section on the
          Bhagavad Gita. With all the current intrigue about Harry Potter, how
          I wish that one day people will read the trilogy of epics (Ramayana,
          Mahabharata, Srimad Bhagavatam) with the same enthusiasm.

          -Natabara


          --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bhuvah_nz
          <no_reply@y...>
          wrote:
          > "For one who has controlled the mind,
          > it is the best of friends,
          > but for one who has failed to do so,
          > it remains the greatest enemy."
          > From the Bhagavad Gita
          > Chapter 6, verse 6
          >
          > And from "Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita" by Sri Chinmoy...
          >
          > "Manushyanam sahasresu...." — "Among thousands of men scarcely
          one
          > strives for spiritual perfection, and of those who strive and
          succeed
          > scarcely one knows me in essence." Sri Krishna
          >
          > It seems that the third verse is throwing cold water on the seeker.
          > But Krishna's intention is anything but that. Krishna is not only
          > all-Wisdom, but also all-Compassion. He wants to tell Arjuna what
          > actually takes place in the spiritual marathon race. Not for him the
          > Knowledge Supreme, to be sure, who owns childish curiosity, shallow
          > enthusiasm, weak determination, flickering devotion and conditional
          > surrender. Any of these undivine qualities will, without fail, fail
          > the inner runner.
          >
          > The sixth and seventh verses describe the relation that exists
          between
          > Sri Krishna and the universe. "I am the beginning and the end of the
          > universe. I am the Source of creation and I am the place of
          > Dissolution. Beyond Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon
          Me
          > as pearls on a string."
          >
          > When we concentrate on "All this is woven unto Me like gems into a
          > necklace," we immediately vision the peerless poet Krishna.
          >
          > To read interesting tales from the Mahabharata you may wish to visit
          > http://www.srichinmoy.org/html/library/stories/m
          ahabharata/index.html
        • bhuvah_nz
          Natabara, I too grew up as a Catholic, going to church every Sunday and teaching CCD (Catholic Catechism Doctrination I think it stands for) to the little
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 9, 2003
            Natabara,

            I too grew up as a Catholic, going to church every Sunday and teaching
            CCD (Catholic Catechism Doctrination I think it stands for) to the
            "little kids" as a 10-year old. I loved going to church and would stay
            with my grandparents wherever possible because they went to church
            more frequently than my parents.

            When the priest would say "Christ has died, Christ has risen, Christ
            will come again" I would dream of what it must have been like to have
            been on earth at 2000 years ago, to have heard Christ's message
            directly, to have spent time with him.

            I would think about the circumstances of His tragic departure from
            earth and of how there were people, the masses, who were against Him;
            there were the indifferent ones; and then there were very, very few
            people who stood up for Him. I would pray that if I had been there, I
            would have had the strength to have been one of those, and I wondered
            how terrible the ones who were not strong enough to stand up for the
            truth and who went along with the injustice must have felt for the
            rest of their lives.

            Then I would calculate my age and how long might I be on earth and
            would I be lucky enough to be on earth when "Christ will come again".
            This was a predominant theme during my childhood.

            I am and will always be grateful to have found a remarkable teacher
            like Sri Chinmoy. To learn from, to be inspired by him directly and to
            spend time with a teacher of his calibre to me is truly a blessing and
            the answer to my childhood prayers. I am so grateful that I am not
            reading his books, watching his videos and wondering what it must have
            been like to have known him while he was here on earth.

            And like you I adore the Ramayana, Mahabharata and Srimad Bhagavatam
            (both in the written and DVD forms).

            Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 4, verse 34
            Just learn the truth, approach a guru with humility. Inquire from them
            submissively and render service. The self-realized can impart
            transcendental knowledge for they have seen the reality.

            Chapter 4, verse 40
            But the ignorant and faithless person who doubts the truth will
            forever be lost. The doubting soul is happy neither in this life or
            the next.

            Have you read the stories from the Puranas (traditional stories and
            teachings based on the spiritual philosophy of the Vedas and the
            Upanishads) at
            http://www.srichinmoy.org/html/library/stories/puranas/index.html

            FROM THE ALL-EMBRACING PHILOSOPHY OF SRI CHINMOY
            It is easier to have faith in the Personal God than in the impersonal.
            God dons the earthly cloak. He bodies forth the creation of His own
            time, and casts a far-flung glance into the yet unborn to bring it
            into existence. He reveals Himself to each individual according to his
            power of receptivity.

            To the beginner, Christ would immediately speak of the Personal God:
            "Pray to your Father in Heaven." To the one a little more advanced, he
            would say, "I am the vine, ye are the branches." But to the one who
            was fully advanced and his dear disciple, he would proclaim: "I and my
            Father are One." We find the same truth echoed in Sri Ramakrishna's
            words. He disclosed to his beloved Naren (Vivekananda), "He who is
            Rama, He who is Krishna, dwells at once in this body as Ramakrishna."

            It is a sad fact that often the disciples of various paths
            misinterpret the teachings of their masters to the extent of claiming
            theirs as the only Master. In doing so, they bring their teachers down
            to the level of ordinary men. An aspirant, they claim, in spite of
            high achievements, counts for nothing unless and until he is prepared
            to give all credit to their master. What blind ignorance!
            ...
            I do believe in an individual approach to God. Each sincere approach
            ultimately leads to the goal. When we come to the Vatican to be
            blessed by the Holy Father, I may come by boat, you may come by plane,
            a third person may come by car and a fourth person may come on foot.
            Each one has used his own means to reach the goal, but the
            destination, which is flooded with infinite Light and delight, is the
            same. Therefore, I give value to each and every individual approach,
            since all ultimately lead to the destination.
            ...
            When great souls come down
            They try to make some special rules
            To better the consciousness
            Of this eyeless and stone-deaf world.
            Ten Thousand Flower-Flames, Poem 7236, Part 73
            ~Sri Chinmoy

            In the heart of oneness,
            Bhuvah


            --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, natabara7
            <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > I grew up in the Catholic Church, was an altar boy, later went to
            > university and studied religion and philosophy, and I have always
            > been fascinated with the correlations between religions and faiths.
            > When I first read the Bhagavad Gita and came across Krishna's
            > utterance to Arjuna:
            >
            > "I am the beginning and the end of the universe. I am the
            > Source of creation and I am the place of Dissolution. Beyond
            > Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon Me as pearls
            > on a string." -- Bhagavad Gita (5000 BC)
            >
            > I couldn't help but think of the famous biblical quote(s):
            >
            > "I am the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the Ending,
            > says the Lord, who is and who was and who is to come, the
            > Almighty." (Rev 1:7-8)
            > "I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the Ending,
            > the First and the Last." (Rev 22:13)
            >
            > Some time ago a group of us visited the Self Realization Fellowship
            > ashram in Encinitas, California, founded by Paramahansa Yogananda
            > (in 1937) who was also intrigued by the mystical correlations of
            > Hinduism and Christianity.
            >
            > It was a beautiful and warm visit -- the grounds are perched on
            > cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and the people there were
            > extremely nice. It also fascinates me how holy places inspire one's
            > thoughts toward higher realms and principles.
            >
            > At the time I was reading two books titled "My Religion" and "The
            > Message-Light of the Bhagavad Gita" (found at
            > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com), reflecting upon the deeper
            > common foundation of all faiths. Right now I am wrapped up in
            > reading the Mahabharata, having just finished the section on the
            > Bhagavad Gita. With all the current intrigue about Harry Potter, how
            > I wish that one day people will read the trilogy of epics (Ramayana,
            > Mahabharata, Srimad Bhagavatam) with the same enthusiasm.
            >
            > -Natabara
            >
            >
            > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bhuvah_nz
            > <no_reply@y...>
            > wrote:
            > > "For one who has controlled the mind,
            > > it is the best of friends,
            > > but for one who has failed to do so,
            > > it remains the greatest enemy."
            > > From the Bhagavad Gita
            > > Chapter 6, verse 6
            > >
            > > And from "Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita" by Sri Chinmoy...
            > >
            > > "Manushyanam sahasresu...." — "Among thousands of men scarcely
            > one
            > > strives for spiritual perfection, and of those who strive and
            > succeed
            > > scarcely one knows me in essence." Sri Krishna
            > >
            > > It seems that the third verse is throwing cold water on the seeker.
            > > But Krishna's intention is anything but that. Krishna is not only
            > > all-Wisdom, but also all-Compassion. He wants to tell Arjuna what
            > > actually takes place in the spiritual marathon race. Not for him the
            > > Knowledge Supreme, to be sure, who owns childish curiosity, shallow
            > > enthusiasm, weak determination, flickering devotion and conditional
            > > surrender. Any of these undivine qualities will, without fail, fail
            > > the inner runner.
            > >
            > > The sixth and seventh verses describe the relation that exists
            > between
            > > Sri Krishna and the universe. "I am the beginning and the end of the
            > > universe. I am the Source of creation and I am the place of
            > > Dissolution. Beyond Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon
            > Me
            > > as pearls on a string."
            > >
            > > When we concentrate on "All this is woven unto Me like gems into a
            > > necklace," we immediately vision the peerless poet Krishna.
            > >
            > > To read interesting tales from the Mahabharata you may wish to visit
            > >
            http://www.srichinmoy.org/html/library/stories/mahabharata/index.html
          • bhuvah_nz
            By the way Natabara, someone once asked Sri Chinmoy: Please express your views of the Catholic Church as an institution as well as your views of its dogmas
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 9, 2003
              By the way Natabara, someone once asked Sri Chinmoy:
              "Please express your views of the Catholic Church as an institution as
              well as your views of its dogmas and moral laws, its fight for the
              freedom of mankind and its work for the growth of mankind."

              And this was his reply:
              "I have great admiration for the Catholic Church, in the same way that
              I appreciate our Hindu temples in India. To me, the Church embodies
              inspiration, aspiration and devotion in the purest sense of the terms.
              To me, each Catholic church, like a Hindu temple, is a heart-garden
              flooded with purity and divinity. It carries humanity's aspiration to
              the highest and brings down God's Compassion to humanity. You can say
              that the Church is the golden bridge between man's aspiration-cry and
              God's Satisfaction-Smile.

              So I do not look upon the Catholic Church as merely an institution
              with various dogmas and moral laws. From my own spiritual point of
              view, I feel that the Church embodies God's sleepless and self-giving
              Breath for the illumination, salvation and perfection of mankind. In
              this sense, God has been working in and through the Holy Father and
              the Church to expedite humanity's inner and outer growth and progress,
              and to fulfil humanity's aspirations for inner and outer freedom and
              liberation."

              From http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com

              --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, natabara7
              <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > I grew up in the Catholic Church, was an altar boy, later went to
              > university and studied religion and philosophy, and I have always
              > been fascinated with the correlations between religions and faiths.
              > When I first read the Bhagavad Gita and came across Krishna's
              > utterance to Arjuna:
              >
              > "I am the beginning and the end of the universe. I am the
              > Source of creation and I am the place of Dissolution. Beyond
              > Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon Me as pearls
              > on a string." -- Bhagavad Gita (5000 BC)
              >
              > I couldn't help but think of the famous biblical quote(s):
              >
              > "I am the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the Ending,
              > says the Lord, who is and who was and who is to come, the
              > Almighty." (Rev 1:7-8)
              > "I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the Ending,
              > the First and the Last." (Rev 22:13)
              >
              > Some time ago a group of us visited the Self Realization Fellowship
              > ashram in Encinitas, California, founded by Paramahansa Yogananda
              > (in 1937) who was also intrigued by the mystical correlations of
              > Hinduism and Christianity.
              >
              > It was a beautiful and warm visit -- the grounds are perched on
              > cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and the people there were
              > extremely nice. It also fascinates me how holy places inspire one's
              > thoughts toward higher realms and principles.
              >
              > At the time I was reading two books titled "My Religion" and "The
              > Message-Light of the Bhagavad Gita" (found at
              > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com ), reflecting upon the deeper
              > common foundation of all faiths. Right now I am wrapped up in
              > reading the Mahabharata, having just finished the section on the
              > Bhagavad Gita. With all the current intrigue about Harry Potter, how
              > I wish that one day people will read the trilogy of epics (Ramayana,
              > Mahabharata, Srimad Bhagavatam) with the same enthusiasm.
              >
              > -Natabara
              >
              >
              > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bhuvah_nz
              > <no_reply@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > "For one who has controlled the mind,
              > > it is the best of friends,
              > > but for one who has failed to do so,
              > > it remains the greatest enemy."
              > > From the Bhagavad Gita
              > > Chapter 6, verse 6
              > >
              > > And from "Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita" by Sri Chinmoy...
              > >
              > > "Manushyanam sahasresu...." — "Among thousands of men scarcely
              > one
              > > strives for spiritual perfection, and of those who strive and
              > succeed
              > > scarcely one knows me in essence." Sri Krishna
              > >
              > > It seems that the third verse is throwing cold water on the seeker.
              > > But Krishna's intention is anything but that. Krishna is not only
              > > all-Wisdom, but also all-Compassion. He wants to tell Arjuna what
              > > actually takes place in the spiritual marathon race. Not for him the
              > > Knowledge Supreme, to be sure, who owns childish curiosity, shallow
              > > enthusiasm, weak determination, flickering devotion and conditional
              > > surrender. Any of these undivine qualities will, without fail, fail
              > > the inner runner.
              > >
              > > The sixth and seventh verses describe the relation that exists
              > between
              > > Sri Krishna and the universe. "I am the beginning and the end of the
              > > universe. I am the Source of creation and I am the place of
              > > Dissolution. Beyond Me, there is nothing. All this is threaded upon
              > Me
              > > as pearls on a string."
              > >
              > > When we concentrate on "All this is woven unto Me like gems into a
              > > necklace," we immediately vision the peerless poet Krishna.
              > >
              > > To read interesting tales from the Mahabharata you may wish to visit
              > >
              http://www.srichinmoy.org/html/library/stories/mahabharata/index.html
            • tejal_light01
              I was fortunate to finally get the immortal Bhagavad Gita book in my [Macedonian] language. It is so close to my heart and soul when I read something written
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 31, 2004
                I was fortunate to "finally" get the immortal Bhagavad Gita book in
                my [Macedonian] language. It is so close to my heart and soul when I
                read something written in my language.

                I have found many, many deep secrets and much more.....

                So, if anyone didn't yet get an opportunity to read it, I recommend
                it from my heart's depths.

                Tejal
              • sharani_sharani
                Tejal s posting on the Bhagavad-Gita inspired me to revisit Sri Chinmoy s book, Commentaries on the Vedas, the Upanishads, and the Bhagavad-Gita: the Three
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 6, 2004
                  Tejal's posting on the Bhagavad-Gita inspired me to revisit Sri
                  Chinmoy's book, "Commentaries on the Vedas, the Upanishads, and the
                  Bhagavad-Gita: the Three Branches of India's Life-Tree." In this
                  book drawn from his college and university lectures, Sri Chinmoy
                  offers a fresh and accessible understanding of ancient Hindu wisdom.
                  The book delves into the deep spiritual traditions of India and
                  includes commentaries on specific verse translations. Sri Chinmoy
                  writes:

                  "The inspiration of Hinduism is the soul-concern of the Gita. The
                  aspiration of Hinduism is the blessing-dawn of the Gita. The
                  emancipation of Hinduism is the compassion-light of the Gita. But to
                  pronounce that the Gita is the sole monopoly of Hinduism is
                  absurdity. The Gita is the common property of humanity."
                  (Commentaries, p.136)

                  I also like the following passage:

                  "The Gita teaches us the purest oneness. This oneness is the inner
                  oneness. This inner oneness is at once spontaneous and unique. This
                  oneness can never be truncated or dwarfed by the mind. The realm of
                  oneness is far beyond the approach of the physical mind. Self-
                  knowledge is the knowledge of universal oneness. Divine perfection
                  can be founded only on the fertile soil of universal oneness."
                  (Commentaries, p. 207)

                  This particular work by Sri Chinmoy is highly respected in scholarly
                  circles. It is housed in many college and university libraries and
                  was used as a textbook in a course on the world's spiritual
                  traditions at a private preparatory school in Florida. Thank you
                  Tejal for inspiring me to revisit it!

                  Sharani Robins
                  Rhode Island, USA


                  --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, tejal_light01
                  <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  > I was fortunate to "finally" get the immortal Bhagavad Gita book in
                  > my [Macedonian] language. It is so close to my heart and soul when I
                  > read something written in my language.
                  >
                  > I have found many, many deep secrets and much more.....
                  >
                  > So, if anyone didn't yet get an opportunity to read it, I recommend
                  > it from my heart's depths.
                  >
                  > Tejal
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