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Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon

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  • bha15257
    [From Bhadra] The third annual Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon was held last Wednesday. I have a somewhat unique perspective on the race, as someone
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2004
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      [From Bhadra]

      The third annual Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon was held
      last Wednesday. I have a somewhat unique perspective on the race, as
      someone who didn't run, but walked one lap around the track in the
      opposite direction from the runners and so was able to see a vast
      slice of all the runners. I was really impressed by the fact that
      the marathon is perfectly named for the spirit in which all the
      runners participated in it. There were very fast runners, who were
      obviously trying to get their best possible time; competent runners,
      who looked as though they knew they would do quite well; terrible
      runners, for whom just trying to finish was obviously a major effort
      in which they might not be successful. There were two water-posts on
      the three-mile loop, and one of the water hander-outers was
      transcending herself, by yelling encouragement to the runners who
      passed her, as a group, every three or four minutes. She kept it up
      all the time that I was in the vicinity of that station (picking up
      empty plastic cups), and I had the impression that she was going to
      keep it up as long as there were any runners coming by. I was also
      blown away by the number of runners who slowed down in their run
      long enough to thank me for picking up cups!
    • nayaknayaknayak
      The marathon was a unique experience for so many people. My unique experience was walking the entire marathon. I cannot run, but I can walk forever. The
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2004
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        The marathon was a unique experience for so many people. My unique
        experience was walking the entire marathon. I cannot run, but I can
        walk forever. The marathon is a bit of forever, but it actually does
        come to an end when you cross the finish line. This was the longest
        I ever took to complete a marathon: 7 hours and 11 minutes. But, I
        kept cheerful the whole time and managed to keep going without
        breakdowns. I still felt the inner pressure of keeping the pace,
        because the cut-off for running the course was seven and a half
        hours, and you can see that I made it with just a little cushion.

        The volunteers staffing the race (all that I saw were Sri Chinmoy
        students) were perfect at their jobs--supplying water and
        refreshments, offering medical support, monitoring the course,
        leading the first men and women runners by bicycle, capturing
        everyone's finish time and place, and generally troubleshooting.

        There was a bit of groaning out on the course, because it is, after
        all, a very long race, and not everyone had trained as much as they
        could have. (I had a little training). The wonderful location was a
        circular loop around a small lake, which afforded all of the
        participants the chance to see the lead runners pass by several
        times.

        Sri Chinmoy meditated for several minutes at the start of the race,
        and then stayed at the starting line to encourage the runners as
        they passed on the first loop or two. Later he sat by the finish
        line to show his support for us as we looped past him several times.

        In the evening he honored those who had won, but he also paid
        affectionate attention to those who had taken six or more hours. He
        also called up those who had improved by a half-hour or more from
        last year's marathon to this one.

        We all came away with determination to do this race again next year,
        and with more training.

        Yours,

        Nayak



        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bha15257
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > [From Bhadra]
        >
        > The third annual Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon was held
        > last Wednesday. I have a somewhat unique perspective on the race,
        > as someone who didn't run, but walked one lap around the track in
        > the opposite direction from the runners and so was able to see a
        > vast slice of all the runners. I was really impressed by the fact
        > that the marathon is perfectly named for the spirit in which all
        > the runners participated in it. There were very fast runners, who
        > were obviously trying to get their best possible time; competent
        > runners, who looked as though they knew they would do quite well;
        > terrible runners, for whom just trying to finish was obviously a
        > major effort in which they might not be successful. There were two
        > water-posts on the three-mile loop, and one of the water
        > hander-outers was transcending herself, by yelling encouragement
        > to the runners who passed her, as a group, every three or four
        > minutes. She kept it up all the time that I was in the vicinity of
        > that station (picking up empty plastic cups), and I had the
        > impression that she was going to keep it up as long as there were
        > any runners coming by. I was also blown away by the number of
        > runners who slowed down in their run long enough to thank me for
        > picking up cups!
      • doriscott20002000
        I would also like to share my experiences during the marathon. My time was 5:18 (last year it was 5:59). My best time ever was 3:47, but this does not say
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 2, 2004
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          I would also like to share my experiences during the marathon. My
          time was 5:18 (last year it was 5:59). My best time ever was 3:47,
          but this does not say anything. I love running. I am a seeker
          runner. My training was running every day for 30 minutes; more than
          that was not possible.

          At this year's marathon, I decided to run one or two laps and then
          stop. But then I listened to Sri Chinmoy giving the race poem, which
          Morris and Martanda have already quoted:

          "Today's marathon
          Is a unique
          God-Invocation
          God-Revelation
          And God-Manifestation
          Journey
          In the physical body-world."

          So, after one lap I had to walk, but I was so inspired by Sri
          Chinmoy's presence that I tried to invoke God inwardly.

          In my imagination, I like the idea of running on an eternal road
          towards a goal step by step, leaving the immediate past behind you.
          I was also inspired by the runners of the 3100 mile race. I told
          myself that a marathon is just a little part of the 3100 miles that
          I can easily do.

          The result was that I was able to run again - not fast, but
          steadily. Whenever I came close to the place where Sri Chinmoy was
          sitting, I didn't feel any pain and I was able to run faster.

          Inwardly I asked God whether I can go forward or whether I would
          break apart. An inner voice told me to go forward. As soon as I
          allowed even a tiny thought to enter me, I slowed down.

          I was very happy to finish the marathon, thanks to my teacher's
          inner support and encouragement. It was meditative running from the
          beginning to the end.

          I heard so much about the Egoscue method that I will try that
          method. I hope I will be able to improve my body, and if possible,
          enjoy running for speed again in the future.

          Thank you, Guru.

          Doris


          In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, nayaknayaknayak
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > The marathon was a unique experience for so many people. My unique
          > experience was walking the entire marathon. I cannot run, but I can
          > walk forever. The marathon is a bit of forever, but it actually does
          > come to an end when you cross the finish line. This was the longest
          > I ever took to complete a marathon: 7 hours and 11 minutes. But, I
          > kept cheerful the whole time and managed to keep going without
          > breakdowns. I still felt the inner pressure of keeping the pace,
          > because the cut-off for running the course was seven and a half
          > hours, and you can see that I made it with just a little cushion.
          >
          > The volunteers staffing the race (all that I saw were Sri Chinmoy
          > students) were perfect at their jobs--supplying water and
          > refreshments, offering medical support, monitoring the course,
          > leading the first men and women runners by bicycle, capturing
          > everyone's finish time and place, and generally troubleshooting.
          >
          > There was a bit of groaning out on the course, because it is, after
          > all, a very long race, and not everyone had trained as much as they
          > could have. (I had a little training). The wonderful location was a
          > circular loop around a small lake, which afforded all of the
          > participants the chance to see the lead runners pass by several
          > times.
          >
          > Sri Chinmoy meditated for several minutes at the start of the race,
          > and then stayed at the starting line to encourage the runners as
          > they passed on the first loop or two. Later he sat by the finish
          > line to show his support for us as we looped past him several times.
          >
          > In the evening he honored those who had won, but he also paid
          > affectionate attention to those who had taken six or more hours. He
          > also called up those who had improved by a half-hour or more from
          > last year's marathon to this one.
          >
          > We all came away with determination to do this race again next year,
          > and with more training.
          >
          > Yours,
          >
          > Nayak
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bha15257
          > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > > [From Bhadra]
          > >
          > > The third annual Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon was held
          > > last Wednesday. I have a somewhat unique perspective on the race,
          > > as someone who didn't run, but walked one lap around the track in
          > > the opposite direction from the runners and so was able to see a
          > > vast slice of all the runners. I was really impressed by the fact
          > > that the marathon is perfectly named for the spirit in which all
          > > the runners participated in it. There were very fast runners, who
          > > were obviously trying to get their best possible time; competent
          > > runners, who looked as though they knew they would do quite well;
          > > terrible runners, for whom just trying to finish was obviously a
          > > major effort in which they might not be successful. There were two
          > > water-posts on the three-mile loop, and one of the water
          > > hander-outers was transcending herself, by yelling encouragement
          > > to the runners who passed her, as a group, every three or four
          > > minutes. She kept it up all the time that I was in the vicinity of
          > > that station (picking up empty plastic cups), and I had the
          > > impression that she was going to keep it up as long as there were
          > > any runners coming by. I was also blown away by the number of
          > > runners who slowed down in their run long enough to thank me for
          > > picking up cups!
        • mpalit
          I am so happy that it is called the Self-Transcendence Marathon ... and that it is all about doing our very best. How else can I explain my thrill and
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 2, 2004
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            I am so happy that it is called the Self-Transcendence Marathon ...
            and that it is all about doing our very best. How else can I explain
            my thrill and satisfaction at having completed a marathon in 6:19 --
            at being able to complete it at all!

            I am so grateful for Sri Chinmoy's inspiration that helps me to
            stretch beyond my boundaries.

            Mahatapa
            New York

            --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, doriscott20002000
            <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > I would also like to share my experiences during the marathon. My
            > time was 5:18 (last year it was 5:59). My best time ever was 3:47,
            > but this does not say anything. I love running. I am a seeker
            > runner. My training was running every day for 30 minutes; more
            > than that was not possible.
            >
            > At this year's marathon, I decided to run one or two laps and then
            > stop. But then I listened to Sri Chinmoy giving the race poem,
            > which Morris and Martanda have already quoted:
            >
            > "Today's marathon
            > Is a unique
            > God-Invocation
            > God-Revelation
            > And God-Manifestation
            > Journey
            > In the physical body-world."
            >
            > So, after one lap I had to walk, but I was so inspired by Sri
            > Chinmoy's presence that I tried to invoke God inwardly.
            >
            > In my imagination, I like the idea of running on an eternal road
            > towards a goal step by step, leaving the immediate past behind
            > you. I was also inspired by the runners of the 3100 mile race. I
            > told myself that a marathon is just a little part of the 3100
            > miles that I can easily do.
            >
            > The result was that I was able to run again - not fast, but
            > steadily. Whenever I came close to the place where Sri Chinmoy was
            > sitting, I didn't feel any pain and I was able to run faster.
            >
            > Inwardly I asked God whether I can go forward or whether I would
            > break apart. An inner voice told me to go forward. As soon as I
            > allowed even a tiny thought to enter me, I slowed down.
            >
            > I was very happy to finish the marathon, thanks to my teacher's
            > inner support and encouragement. It was meditative running from
            > the beginning to the end.
            >
            > I heard so much about the Egoscue method that I will try that
            > method. I hope I will be able to improve my body, and if possible,
            > enjoy running for speed again in the future.
            >
            > Thank you, Guru.
            >
            > Doris
            >
            >
            > In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, nayaknayaknayak
            > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > > The marathon was a unique experience for so many people. My
            > > unique experience was walking the entire marathon. I cannot run,
            > > but I can walk forever. The marathon is a bit of forever, but it
            > > actually does come to an end when you cross the finish line.
            > > This was the longest I ever took to complete a marathon: 7 hours
            > > and 11 minutes. But, I kept cheerful the whole time and managed
            > > to keep going without breakdowns. I still felt the inner
            > > pressure of keeping the pace, because the cut-off for running
            > > the course was seven and a half hours, and you can see that I
            > > made it with just a little cushion.
            > >
            > > The volunteers staffing the race (all that I saw were Sri
            > > Chinmoy students) were perfect at their jobs--supplying water
            > > and refreshments, offering medical support, monitoring the
            > > course, leading the first men and women runners by bicycle,
            > > capturing everyone's finish time and place, and generally
            > > troubleshooting.
            > >
            > > There was a bit of groaning out on the course, because it is,
            > > after all, a very long race, and not everyone had trained as
            > > much as they could have. (I had a little training). The
            > > wonderful location was a circular loop around a small lake,
            > > which afforded all of the participants the chance to see the
            > > lead runners pass by several times.
            > >
            > > Sri Chinmoy meditated for several minutes at the start of the
            > > race, and then stayed at the starting line to encourage the
            > > runners as they passed on the first loop or two. Later he sat by
            > > the finish line to show his support for us as we looped past him
            > > several times.
            > >
            > > In the evening he honored those who had won, but he also paid
            > > affectionate attention to those who had taken six or more hours.
            > > He also called up those who had improved by a half-hour or more
            > > from last year's marathon to this one.
            > >
            > > We all came away with determination to do this race again next
            > > year, and with more training.
            > >
            > > Yours,
            > >
            > > Nayak
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bha15257
            > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > > > [From Bhadra]
            > > >
            > > > The third annual Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon was
            > > > held last Wednesday. I have a somewhat unique perspective on
            > > > the race, as someone who didn't run, but walked one lap around
            > > > the track in the opposite direction from the runners and so
            > > > was able to see a vast slice of all the runners. I was really
            > > > impressed by the fact that the marathon is perfectly named for
            > > > the spirit in which all the runners participated in it. There
            > > > were very fast runners, who were obviously trying to get their
            > > > best possible time; competent runners, who looked as though
            > > > they knew they would do quite well; terrible runners, for whom
            > > > just trying to finish was obviously a major effort in which
            > > > they might not be successful. There were two water-posts on
            > > > the three-mile loop, and one of the water hander-outers was
            > > > transcending herself, by yelling encouragement to the runners
            > > > who passed her, as a group, every three or four minutes. She
            > > > kept it up all the time that I was in the vicinity of that
            > > > station (picking up empty plastic cups), and I had the
            > > > impression that she was going to keep it up as long as there
            > > > were any runners coming by. I was also blown away by the
            > > > number of runners who slowed down in their run long enough to
            > > > thank me for picking up cups!
          • sare_bear2713
            I loved the marathon too. I had a very weird experience towards the end of the race. From the very start I tried my hardest to stay cheerful, even though I
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 3, 2004
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              I loved the marathon too. I had a very weird experience towards the
              end of the race.

              From the very start I tried my hardest to stay cheerful, even though
              I felt as though I was going at a snail's pace. Considering my
              marathon times in the 'good old days,' staying cheerful was quite a
              challenge. I just tried to remind myself what a privilege it was to
              be involved, but also made a mental note to really do some quality
              speedwork before the next marathon. At times I really felt like
              walking, and by mile 20 I did start walking - to my amazement I
              seemed to be going faster than when I was running!

              Every lap, Hilal's readings of Sri Chinmoy's aphorisms would repeat
              inside my head and I just prayed for God's will to guide me. I was
              certainly experiencing "God Invocation," but by mile 20 was still
              eagerly awaiting a sudden blast of revelation and manifestation!

              At that moment I plodded around a bend in the lake, and off in the
              distance I heard a song being played that I remember I used to play
              for hours on end in my bedroom as a teenager. I used to drive my
              parents crazy playing this song as loud as I could in my rebel years
              (the group is called U2). Within a split second something switched
              inside me. I don't even know what happened, but for the next 9 miles
              I sprinted like I haven't done in years, right to the finish line! I
              don't even want to understand this experience - from a snail's pace
              to a 9 mile sprint, but it felt awesome and I really think that
              hearing that song was an absolute gift from above!

              Sarah
              Melbourne



              --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, mpalit
              <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > I am so happy that it is called the Self-Transcendence Marathon
              > ... and that it is all about doing our very best. How else can I
              > explain my thrill and satisfaction at having completed a marathon
              > in 6:19 - - at being able to complete it at all!
              >
              > I am so grateful for Sri Chinmoy's inspiration that helps me to
              > stretch beyond my boundaries.
              >
              > Mahatapa
              > New York
              >
              > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, doriscott20002000
              > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > > I would also like to share my experiences during the marathon.
              > > My time was 5:18 (last year it was 5:59). My best time ever was
              > > 3:47, but this does not say anything. I love running. I am a
              > > seeker runner. My training was running every day for 30 minutes;
              > > more than that was not possible.
              > >
              > > At this year's marathon, I decided to run one or two laps and
              > > then stop. But then I listened to Sri Chinmoy giving the race
              > > poem, which Morris and Martanda have already quoted:
              > >
              > > "Today's marathon
              > > Is a unique
              > > God-Invocation
              > > God-Revelation
              > > And God-Manifestation
              > > Journey
              > > In the physical body-world."
              > >
              > > So, after one lap I had to walk, but I was so inspired by Sri
              > > Chinmoy's presence that I tried to invoke God inwardly.
              > >
              > > In my imagination, I like the idea of running on an eternal road
              > > towards a goal step by step, leaving the immediate past behind
              > > you. I was also inspired by the runners of the 3100 mile race. I
              > > told myself that a marathon is just a little part of the 3100
              > > miles that I can easily do.
              > >
              > > The result was that I was able to run again - not fast, but
              > > steadily. Whenever I came close to the place where Sri Chinmoy
              > > was sitting, I didn't feel any pain and I was able to run
              > > faster.
              > >
              > > Inwardly I asked God whether I can go forward or whether I would
              > > break apart. An inner voice told me to go forward. As soon as I
              > > allowed even a tiny thought to enter me, I slowed down.
              > >
              > > I was very happy to finish the marathon, thanks to my teacher's
              > > inner support and encouragement. It was meditative running from
              > > the beginning to the end.
              > >
              > > I heard so much about the Egoscue method that I will try that
              > > method. I hope I will be able to improve my body, and if
              > > possible, enjoy running for speed again in the future.
              > >
              > > Thank you, Guru.
              > >
              > > Doris
              > >
              > >
              > > In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, nayaknayaknayak
              > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > > > The marathon was a unique experience for so many people. My
              > > > unique experience was walking the entire marathon. I cannot
              > > > run, but I can walk forever. The marathon is a bit of forever,
              > > > but it actually does come to an end when you cross the finish
              > > > line. This was the longest I ever took to complete a marathon:
              > > > 7 hours and 11 minutes. But, I kept cheerful the whole time
              > > > and managed to keep going without breakdowns. I still felt the
              > > > inner pressure of keeping the pace, because the cut-off for
              > > > running the course was seven and a half hours, and you can see
              > > > that I made it with just a little cushion.
              > > >
              > > > The volunteers staffing the race (all that I saw were Sri
              > > > Chinmoy students) were perfect at their jobs--supplying water
              > > > and refreshments, offering medical support, monitoring the
              > > > course, leading the first men and women runners by bicycle,
              > > > capturing everyone's finish time and place, and generally
              > > > troubleshooting.
              > > >
              > > > There was a bit of groaning out on the course, because it is,
              > > > after all, a very long race, and not everyone had trained as
              > > > much as they could have. (I had a little training). The
              > > > wonderful location was a circular loop around a small lake,
              > > > which afforded all of the participants the chance to see the
              > > > lead runners pass by several times.
              > > >
              > > > Sri Chinmoy meditated for several minutes at the start of the
              > > > race, and then stayed at the starting line to encourage the
              > > > runners as they passed on the first loop or two. Later he sat
              > > > by the finish line to show his support for us as we looped
              > > > past him several times.
              > > >
              > > > In the evening he honored those who had won, but he also paid
              > > > affectionate attention to those who had taken six or more
              > > > hours. He also called up those who had improved by a half-hour
              > > > or more from last year's marathon to this one.
              > > >
              > > > We all came away with determination to do this race again next
              > > > year, and with more training.
              > > >
              > > > Yours,
              > > >
              > > > Nayak
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bha15257
              > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              > > > > [From Bhadra]
              > > > >
              > > > > The third annual Sri Chinmoy Self-Transcendence Marathon was
              > > > > held last Wednesday. I have a somewhat unique perspective on
              > > > > the race, as someone who didn't run, but walked one lap
              > > > > around the track in the opposite direction from the runners
              > > > > and so was able to see a vast slice of all the runners. I
              > > > > was really impressed by the fact that the marathon is
              > > > > perfectly named for the spirit in which all the runners
              > > > > participated in it. There were very fast runners, who were
              > > > > obviously trying to get their best possible time; competent
              > > > > runners, who looked as though they knew they would do quite
              > > > > well; terrible runners, for whom just trying to finish was
              > > > > obviously a major effort in which they might not be
              > > > > successful. There were two water-posts on the three-mile
              > > > > loop, and one of the water hander-outers was transcending
              > > > > herself, by yelling encouragement to the runners who passed
              > > > > her, as a group, every three or four minutes. She kept it up
              > > > > all the time that I was in the vicinity of that station
              > > > > (picking up empty plastic cups), and I had the impression
              > > > > that she was going to keep it up as long as there were any
              > > > > runners coming by. I was also blown away by the number of
              > > > > runners who slowed down in their run long enough to thank me
              > > > > for picking up cups!
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