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Re: My scaffoid experience

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  • nayak_ltp
    Prachar, this is just a super story (and so well written, with a wonderful touch of humor that did not detract from our sympathetic esperience of your pain.
    Message 1 of 4 , May 3, 2003
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      Prachar, this is just a super story (and so well written, with a
      wonderful touch of humor that did not detract from our sympathetic
      esperience of your pain.

      What a privilege to have that experience. Precious.

      Thanks,

      Nayak

      Here are some nice links:

      Sri Chinmoy Library - http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com

      Sri Chinmoy Poetry - http://www.srichinmoypoetry.com

      Sri Chinmoy Races - http://www.srichinmoyraces.org

      Sri Chinmoy Centre - http://www.srichinmoycentre.org

      Sri Chinmoy Music - http://www.srichinmoymusic.com

      Sri Chinmoy Art - http://www.srichinmoyart.com

      Radio Sri Chinmoy - http://www.radiosrichinmoy.org

      Sri Chinmoy TV - http://www.srichinmoy.tv

      Sri Chinmoy's main site: http://www.srichinmoy.org


      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, "Prachar"
      <prachar@s...> wrote:
      > I was flying horizontal through the air, my outspread fingers
      barely an inch
      > from clasping the hovering disc and claiming the match-winning
      touchdown in
      > the decider of our 'ultimate frisbee' competition.
      >
      > At that precise moment I was ignominiously and illegally cut down
      from
      > behind, crashing heavily on my outstretched hand which had
      instinctively
      > responded to protect me from the fast approaching concrete track
      which
      > formed our end-zone.
      >
      > I was so incensed at the actions of my opponent that I ignored the
      pain and
      > continued playing out the game, which we ultimately lost.
      >
      > Later that night, around 1 am the pain was getting intense, so I
      went to the
      > hospital. The intern who examined me assured me everything was
      fine and I
      > should just go home.
      >
      > However, the following morning, everything clearly was not 'fine'
      and I was
      > advised to go to another hospital. Here several X-rays were taken,
      and the
      > expert told me quite excitedly, "You've broken your scaffoid bone.
      That's
      > probably the worst bone in your body to break."
      >
      > He was excited because he had only recently attended a conference
      on the
      > scaffoid bone, presented by the world's leading scaffoid bone
      specialist, an
      > Australian. The fact that I was Australian and had broken my
      scaffoid bone
      > he felt was altogether wonderful, as if things didn't go well, I
      might have
      > the opportunity to visit his hero, the world number one scaffoid
      man.
      >
      > He further explained the reason why the scaffoid is the one bone
      you don't
      > want to break. Unlike every other bone in the body, which is
      serviced by
      > arteries with fresh bone-building blood flowing strongly from the
      heart, the
      > scaffoid is in the vicinity of only one vein, with a weak blood
      flow
      > returning to the heart from the remoteness of the thumb. This
      means that
      > the scaffoid is notoriously slow to heal and if the said vein is
      not
      > perfectly aligned with the bone, it quite often does not heal at
      all,
      > necessitating an operation to insert a metal pin to induce the bone
      to bind.
      >
      > It was this prospect which might lead me eventually to the
      Australian expert
      > of experts, as it was this particular scaffoid-binding operation
      that he had
      > supposedly perfected and for which he had earned his globe-spanning
      renown.
      >
      > The following day I flew from New York back to Australia, the
      forearm in its
      > peculiar thumb-isolating scaffoid cast thrust aloft for the entire
      > excruciating journey.
      >
      > I had been told the bone would take 4 to 6 weeks to heal, if it was
      going to
      > heal at all. I checked in with the hospital in Canberra, and they
      told me
      > to present for X-rays after 3 weeks, then again after 6 weeks.
      >
      > After 6 weeks, the X-ray looked virtually the same as the original
      one taken
      > in New York the morning after the fall. There was a very visible
      and
      > distinct break, no matter which angle was presented. I was
      referred to
      > another hospital and a specialist. He injected me with some
      radioactive
      > substance, then performed some scan which only confirmed what the X-
      ray had
      > already clearly shown.
      >
      > I was to come back in 2 days to have the operation to get the metal
      pin
      > inserted.
      >
      > I phoned my friend in New York, and asked him to let Sri Chinmoy
      know what
      > was happening with my troublesome scaffoid. He returned my call
      the next
      > day, telling me that Sri Chinmoy had said only that "everything
      will be all
      > right." He had not advised me not to undergo the operation, which
      now
      > seemed the only chance of ever getting my scaffoid, and hence my
      whole arm
      > back in operation.
      >
      > When I arrived at the hospital, the specialist who had seen me
      previously
      > was not available, so another doctor was there to perform the
      operation. He
      > decided he would like to see X-rays from a few different angles to
      what had
      > been previously taken. So he went ahead and shot the X-rays, and
      left the
      > room to examine them.
      >
      > About 10 minutes later he returned, and proceeded calmly to remove
      the cast
      > from my arm. Only when the cast was completely removed he
      said, "You can go
      > home now. Only don't do any strenuous exercise for a few days."
      >
      > He gave me the new X-rays to take home. I still have both sets of
      X-rays,
      > taken 3 days apart. The first, after 6 weeks in plaster showing a
      complete
      > break, the second 3 days later showing a perfectly formed whole
      scaffoid
      > bone.
      >
      > Whenever I think of my little scaffoid bone, I am grateful to my
      Guru for
      > showing me just a tiny glimpse of his miracle-power.
    • upasito
      Dear Prachar, I am extremely inspired by your miraculous recovery with the help of Shri Chinmoy s miracle-power. I hope there will be more postings like this.
      Message 2 of 4 , May 3, 2003
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        Dear Prachar,

        I am extremely inspired by your miraculous recovery with the
        help of Shri Chinmoy's miracle-power. I hope there will be more
        postings like this.

        Thanks for the posting.

        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, "Prachar"
        <prachar@s...> wrote:
        > I was flying horizontal through the air, my outspread fingers
        barely an inch
        > from clasping the hovering disc and claiming the match-winning
        touchdown in
        > the decider of our 'ultimate frisbee' competition.
        >
        > At that precise moment I was ignominiously and illegally cut down
        from
        > behind, crashing heavily on my outstretched hand which had
        instinctively
        > responded to protect me from the fast approaching concrete track
        which
        > formed our end-zone.
        >
        > I was so incensed at the actions of my opponent that I ignored the
        pain and
        > continued playing out the game, which we ultimately lost.
        >
        > Later that night, around 1 am the pain was getting intense, so I
        went to the
        > hospital. The intern who examined me assured me everything was
        fine and I
        > should just go home.
        >
        > However, the following morning, everything clearly was not 'fine'
        and I was
        > advised to go to another hospital. Here several X-rays were taken,
        and the
        > expert told me quite excitedly, "You've broken your scaffoid bone.
        That's
        > probably the worst bone in your body to break."
        >
        > He was excited because he had only recently attended a conference
        on the
        > scaffoid bone, presented by the world's leading scaffoid bone
        specialist, an
        > Australian. The fact that I was Australian and had broken my
        scaffoid bone
        > he felt was altogether wonderful, as if things didn't go well, I
        might have
        > the opportunity to visit his hero, the world number one scaffoid
        man.
        >
        > He further explained the reason why the scaffoid is the one bone
        you don't
        > want to break. Unlike every other bone in the body, which is
        serviced by
        > arteries with fresh bone-building blood flowing strongly from the
        heart, the
        > scaffoid is in the vicinity of only one vein, with a weak blood
        flow
        > returning to the heart from the remoteness of the thumb. This
        means that
        > the scaffoid is notoriously slow to heal and if the said vein is
        not
        > perfectly aligned with the bone, it quite often does not heal at
        all,
        > necessitating an operation to insert a metal pin to induce the bone
        to bind.
        >
        > It was this prospect which might lead me eventually to the
        Australian expert
        > of experts, as it was this particular scaffoid-binding operation
        that he had
        > supposedly perfected and for which he had earned his globe-spanning
        renown.
        >
        > The following day I flew from New York back to Australia, the
        forearm in its
        > peculiar thumb-isolating scaffoid cast thrust aloft for the entire
        > excruciating journey.
        >
        > I had been told the bone would take 4 to 6 weeks to heal, if it was
        going to
        > heal at all. I checked in with the hospital in Canberra, and they
        told me
        > to present for X-rays after 3 weeks, then again after 6 weeks.
        >
        > After 6 weeks, the X-ray looked virtually the same as the original
        one taken
        > in New York the morning after the fall. There was a very visible
        and
        > distinct break, no matter which angle was presented. I was
        referred to
        > another hospital and a specialist. He injected me with some
        radioactive
        > substance, then performed some scan which only confirmed what the X-
        ray had
        > already clearly shown.
        >
        > I was to come back in 2 days to have the operation to get the metal
        pin
        > inserted.
        >
        > I phoned my friend in New York, and asked him to let Sri Chinmoy
        know what
        > was happening with my troublesome scaffoid. He returned my call
        the next
        > day, telling me that Sri Chinmoy had said only that "everything
        will be all
        > right." He had not advised me not to undergo the operation, which
        now
        > seemed the only chance of ever getting my scaffoid, and hence my
        whole arm
        > back in operation.
        >
        > When I arrived at the hospital, the specialist who had seen me
        previously
        > was not available, so another doctor was there to perform the
        operation. He
        > decided he would like to see X-rays from a few different angles to
        what had
        > been previously taken. So he went ahead and shot the X-rays, and
        left the
        > room to examine them.
        >
        > About 10 minutes later he returned, and proceeded calmly to remove
        the cast
        > from my arm. Only when the cast was completely removed he
        said, "You can go
        > home now. Only don't do any strenuous exercise for a few days."
        >
        > He gave me the new X-rays to take home. I still have both sets of
        X-rays,
        > taken 3 days apart. The first, after 6 weeks in plaster showing a
        complete
        > break, the second 3 days later showing a perfectly formed whole
        scaffoid
        > bone.
        >
        > Whenever I think of my little scaffoid bone, I am grateful to my
        Guru for
        > showing me just a tiny glimpse of his miracle-power.
      • Priyadarshan
        Prachar, Thank you very much for sharing with me your scaffoid experience. You are indeed extremely talented, not only with music (and I will always, always
        Message 3 of 4 , May 6, 2003
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          Prachar,

          Thank you very much for sharing with me your "scaffoid" experience.
          You are indeed extremely talented, not only with music (and I will always,
          always remember the most exquisite performance you conducted on April 13
          2003. As Sri Chinmoy himself said, it was "memorable") but also with poetry
          and prose.

          Gratitude

          priyadarshan

          ------
          A few links to good sites about Sri Chinmoy, and Sri Chinmoy's works:

          Sri Chinmoy Library - http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com

          Sri Chinmoy Poetry - http://www.srichinmoypoetry.com

          Sri Chinmoy Races - http://www.srichinmoyraces.org

          Sri Chinmoy Centre - http://www.srichinmoycentre.org

          Sri Chinmoy Music - http://www.srichinmoymusic.com

          Sri Chinmoy Art - http://www.srichinmoyart.com

          Radio Sri Chinmoy - http://www.radiosrichinmoy.org

          Sri Chinmoy TV - http://www.srichinmoy.tv

          Sri Chinmoy's main site: http://www.srichinmoy.org

          >
          > I was flying horizontal through the air, my outspread fingers barely an inch
          > from clasping the hovering disc and claiming the match-winning touchdown in
          > the decider of our 'ultimate frisbee' competition.
          >
          > At that precise moment I was ignominiously and illegally cut down from
          > behind, crashing heavily on my outstretched hand which had instinctively
          > responded to protect me from the fast approaching concrete track which
          > formed our end-zone.
          >
          > I was so incensed at the actions of my opponent that I ignored the pain and
          > continued playing out the game, which we ultimately lost.
          >
          > Later that night, around 1 am the pain was getting intense, so I went to the
          > hospital. The intern who examined me assured me everything was fine and I
          > should just go home.
          >
          > However, the following morning, everything clearly was not 'fine' and I was
          > advised to go to another hospital. Here several X-rays were taken, and the
          > expert told me quite excitedly, "You've broken your scaffoid bone. That's
          > probably the worst bone in your body to break."
          >
          > He was excited because he had only recently attended a conference on the
          > scaffoid bone, presented by the world's leading scaffoid bone specialist, an
          > Australian. The fact that I was Australian and had broken my scaffoid bone
          > he felt was altogether wonderful, as if things didn't go well, I might have
          > the opportunity to visit his hero, the world number one scaffoid man.
          >
          > He further explained the reason why the scaffoid is the one bone you don't
          > want to break. Unlike every other bone in the body, which is serviced by
          > arteries with fresh bone-building blood flowing strongly from the heart, the
          > scaffoid is in the vicinity of only one vein, with a weak blood flow
          > returning to the heart from the remoteness of the thumb. This means that
          > the scaffoid is notoriously slow to heal and if the said vein is not
          > perfectly aligned with the bone, it quite often does not heal at all,
          > necessitating an operation to insert a metal pin to induce the bone to bind.
          >
          > It was this prospect which might lead me eventually to the Australian expert
          > of experts, as it was this particular scaffoid-binding operation that he had
          > supposedly perfected and for which he had earned his globe-spanning renown.
          >
          > The following day I flew from New York back to Australia, the forearm in its
          > peculiar thumb-isolating scaffoid cast thrust aloft for the entire
          > excruciating journey.
          >
          > I had been told the bone would take 4 to 6 weeks to heal, if it was going to
          > heal at all. I checked in with the hospital in Canberra, and they told me
          > to present for X-rays after 3 weeks, then again after 6 weeks.
          >
          > After 6 weeks, the X-ray looked virtually the same as the original one taken
          > in New York the morning after the fall. There was a very visible and
          > distinct break, no matter which angle was presented. I was referred to
          > another hospital and a specialist. He injected me with some radioactive
          > substance, then performed some scan which only confirmed what the X-ray had
          > already clearly shown.
          >
          > I was to come back in 2 days to have the operation to get the metal pin
          > inserted.
          >
          > I phoned my friend in New York, and asked him to let Sri Chinmoy know what
          > was happening with my troublesome scaffoid. He returned my call the next
          > day, telling me that Sri Chinmoy had said only that "everything will be all
          > right." He had not advised me not to undergo the operation, which now
          > seemed the only chance of ever getting my scaffoid, and hence my whole arm
          > back in operation.
          >
          > When I arrived at the hospital, the specialist who had seen me previously
          > was not available, so another doctor was there to perform the operation. He
          > decided he would like to see X-rays from a few different angles to what had
          > been previously taken. So he went ahead and shot the X-rays, and left the
          > room to examine them.
          >
          > About 10 minutes later he returned, and proceeded calmly to remove the cast
          > from my arm. Only when the cast was completely removed he said, "You can go
          > home now. Only don't do any strenuous exercise for a few days."
          >
          > He gave me the new X-rays to take home. I still have both sets of X-rays,
          > taken 3 days apart. The first, after 6 weeks in plaster showing a complete
          > break, the second 3 days later showing a perfectly formed whole scaffoid
          > bone.
          >
          > Whenever I think of my little scaffoid bone, I am grateful to my Guru for
          > showing me just a tiny glimpse of his miracle-power.
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
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