Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: The Honey Jar

Expand Messages
  • sharani_sharani
    You paint the picture of this experience so powerfully, I myself cried after reading it. Sharani
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 10, 2011
      You paint the picture of this experience so powerfully, I myself cried after reading it.

      Sharani
    • doris.cott
      Dear Sharani and Jogyata, Who would not cry after reading this? What a shirt can do! This man did not believe in peace (understandably!) but a shirt about the
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 11, 2011
        Dear Sharani and Jogyata,

        Who would not cry after reading this? What a shirt can do! This man did not believe in peace (understandably!) but a shirt about the World Harmony Run made him share his story with a few passengers but now many do know it. They say, "Misery loves company". I don't want to know *how many* experiences of this kind only God knows! Remember? "Humour My Only Saviour!"

        A wise person once said that human consolation does not last long let alone for good. May this poem does the impossible.

        "I am so fortunate
        That my life is loved
        By countless people
        And I am not a hopeless soul."

        -Sri Chinmoy
        http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/books/1454/750

        * * *
      • nirnaya.yugoslavia
        This reminds me of a similar event that happened in the circle of my friends and relatives some 16 years ago, when a father lost his most precious son. While
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 11, 2011
          This reminds me of a similar event that happened in the circle of my friends and relatives some 16 years ago, when a father lost his most precious son. While it was bad enough for all of us to deal with the loss, it was absolutely heart-wrenching to observe that man's pain. I mean really-really.. really(!) It seemed that stricken with such grief, a human being can not manage to live on.

          I saw that person recently, and he fully recovered, although it took a number of years. We shared some memories of long, long ago, and I noticed that he got, in a way, changed. Actually, strange to say, but the whole tragedy managed to bring forward some subtle quality that I would never expect.. some sort of appreciation for life that his old rigid, intellectual personality would never accept. I felt as if he was whispering between the lines: "I was wrong, there is something else, there has to be, it can not be just nothing, just- enjoy while you can then get annihilated, the emptiness, life must be something else or about something else".

          To finish up, I'll quote the very famous psychiatrist Carl Jung, from an interview where he talks about how something in us rejects death.

          C.Jung:
          "I have treated many old people and it's quite interesting to watch what is their Unconscious doing with the fact that it is apparently threatened with a complete end. It disregards it! Life believes as if it were going on. So I think it is better for an old person to live on, to look forward to the next day, as if he had to spend centuries. Then he lives properly. But when he is afraid, when he doesn't look forward, when he looks back, he petrifies, he gets stiff and he dies before his time. But when he lives on, looking for the great adventure that is ahead, then he lives... Of course, it's quite obvious that we all are going to die and this is the sad finale of everything, BUT, nevertheless, there is something in us that doesn't believe it, apparently. But this is merely a psychological fact, it doesn't mean to me that is proves something - it is simply so. I may not know why we need salt, but we prefer to eat salt because you feel better. And so if you think in a certain way, you may feel considerably better. And, I think, that if you think along the lines of nature, then you think properly."
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.