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7,000 Songs - A Remarkable Feat

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  • tejvan13
    When visiting New York for celebrations, there are often so many remarkable things happening that you almost become accustomed to the extraordinary (from
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 6, 2010
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      When visiting New York for celebrations, there are often so many remarkable things happening that you almost become accustomed to the extraordinary (from Guinness world Records to record breaking lifts, to 3100 mile runners). I remember once sitting on the bleaches as Sri Chinmoy was lifting several dignitaries weighing somewhere between 150 and 250 lbs. I remember taking it for granted that anything Guru tried to lift he would. He made it look so effortless, it was like anyone could have gone down there and do exactly the same. It became very easy to forget how difficult the weightlifting feats actually were. From a seated position, a one handed lift is a remarkable feat for even the strongest weightlifter - let alone a thin 74 year old. But, around Guru, one easily become accustomed to the extraordinary.

      At one of my early celebrations, I remember, Kailash's group completing 1,000 songs they had learnt by heart. I know how long it takes me to learn one song, let alone ten, or one hundred. So I should have been more impressed, but, back then it was just another remarkable feat among many. But, it really is a staggering feat to learn and perform, over the course of a few years, 7,000 songs off by heart!


      Sri Chinmoy songs have been arranged in many ways. Many are very good and very soulful. But, I really love his songs being sung just as they are written - there is a great purity, simplicity and meditative feeling. Kailash's group almost reminds me of Gregorian chant, a music that I am very fond of.

      Kailash talking about his group
      http://www.radiosrichinmoy.org/radio/412

      A recording from April 2004
      http://www.radiosrichinmoy.org/radio/20


      ~

      Tejvan
    • sarada1007
      Hello Tejvan, Your posting reminds me of something I keep meaning to say about Sri Chinmoy s seated lifts. I work as a professional safety and health
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 22, 2010
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        Hello Tejvan,

        Your posting reminds me of something I keep meaning to say about Sri Chinmoy's seated lifts.

        I work as a professional safety and health practitioner. This means that I advise on all areas of health and safety, including things to do with 'manual handling' (lifting, pushing, pulling, carrying and so forth). There are so many injuries which arise at work from lifting and handling, that the European Union issued a 'Directive' (bear with me, this does get more interesting!) specifically about manual handling. And then each EU member state had to produce it's own specific laws. In the UK we have the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, which come with a guidance document and guideline weights which are reasonable for about 95 percent of the working population to lift without a more detailed assessment taking place.

        If you are lifting at waist height whilst standing, perhaps moving a box from one table at waist height to another, then the guideline weight for men is 25kg and for women is 16kg. If greater weights are involved then you have to do a special detailed assessment.

        The interesting thing is that the guideline weight for sitting down and lifting something near to the waist is only 5kg for a man and 3kg for a woman. So you can see it is much harder to lift weights whilst seated than whilst standing. The fact that Sri Chinmoy did so much of his lifting from a seated position makes it all the more extraordinary.

        Sharada
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