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Re: Transcendence-Perfection

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  • morrisklein27
    I like HarmonyVision s selection of this particular poem (see message 2362). How amazing that Sri Chinmoy could have created and written this poem
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 3, 2004
      I like HarmonyVision's selection of this particular poem (see message
      2362). How amazing that Sri Chinmoy could have created and written
      this poem spontaneously, along with 842 others in a twenty-four hour
      time period.

      Sri Chinmoy feels that all of us have locked within ourselves
      tremendous creative abilities that meditation can and will unleash.
      If we can allow the Supreme to work in and through us, we also can
      participate in the endless flow of divine creativity.

      The greatest artists are the most humble. Bach and Shakespeare both
      regarded themselves as mere instruments in the hands of some greater
      power. Sri Chinmoy also feels that he is a humble instrument of God,
      revealing whatever the Divine wants him to reveal.

      To me, Sri Chinmoy's humility is one of the things that makes his
      poetry and art so attractive. He is an example to all artists in his
      surrender to the One Will.

      Here's another poem that deals with surrender. In this case, the
      seeker discusses what surrender means in the various phases of his
      life- as a child, as an adult, and as an old man. I would gratefully
      welcome any insights on this most remarkable poem:



      I loved my life's morning walks;
      Hope-beauty led my eyes
      And guided my steps.
      I love my life's midday runs;
      Reality's naked life has sent
      uncertainty into destruction-exile.
      I shall love my life's evening
      Stumblings.
      Life divine shall embrace the abyss
      Of science.
      Evening does not mark the end.
      Evening is the precursor
      Of a purer dawn and a brighter sun.
      In my heart-dawn, my preparation
      Shall begin.
      In my soul-sun, my perfection
      Shall bloom.

      -Sri Chinmoy





      Sincerely,


      Morris Klein
    • mahiruha_27
      I ve been giving some more thought to Transcendence-Perfection, partially in light of its upcoming 40th anniversary. I find it easier to memorize a large work
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 10, 2015

        I've been giving some more thought to Transcendence-Perfection, partially in light of its upcoming 40th anniversary.

        I find it easier to memorize a large work of poetry if I divide it up into themes.  Therefore, I went through the whole book and tagged each poem; I eventually sorted the poems under some seventy themes, like forgiveness, the universe, patience, the spiritual Master, etc.

        One of my favorite themes was "the universe" or "cosmos".  Here are some poems from that theme:


        His eyes are made of the beauty of the stars.
        His arms are made of the duty of the sun.
        His head is made of the beauty of the moon.
        His life belongs not to him
        But to the God-Vision operating in humanity.
        His life is divinity's progress in humanity's success.
        ***

        The sun is dancing,
        The moon is dancing,
        The stars are dancing.
        I am dancing this moment
        With the sun, moon and stars.
        Next moment I am sailing
        With the sky.
        The sky makes me feel
        That I am the vastness of Infinity's Heart;
        The sun, moon and stars make me feel
        That God's creation is for ecstasy's beginningless birth
        And endless journey.
        ***
        I have not seen the path
        That leads towards perfection.
        Only he who speaks from the summit
        Can embrace perfection-day.
        In him the success-life
        And the progress-soul
        Together shall stay
        To feed the face of ever-transcending
        Satisfaction-sun.

        (Sri Chinmoy, Transcendence-Perfection, Agni Press, 1977)


        The first poem, "His eyes are made of the beauty of the stars" is a beautiful example of word music.  Such pure sound!  I like the idea of a spiritual Master's very head radiating moonlit beauty.


        The second poem, "The sun is dancing..." changes abruptly in the middle of the poem.  The poet first declares that the sun, moon and stars are dancing and that he is joining him: "I am dancing this moment with the sun, moon and stars".  Then, he remarks, "Next moment, I am sailing with the sky.  The sky makes me feel that I am the vastness of Infinity's Heart."  So, he actually transcends the feeling of dancing with the stars, he goes beyond that and points to a greater fulfilment- the serene peace of "sailing with the sky".  But, then, he takes the poem to a yet higher plateau as he brings back the heavenly bodies in the last lines: "The sun, moon and stars make me feel that God's Creation is for ecstasy's beginningless birth and endless journey."  To be frank, I feel that Guru could have continued this poem indefinitely, stanza after stanza, raising the pitched battle between the vast blue sky and the celestial spheres to ever higher and higher states of ecstasy.  I think this poem suggests the experience of samadhi.


        The final poem I've quoted, "I have not seen the path that leads towards perfection" is an example of the Master working through the mode of mantra.  It's a very interesting poem.  In the first line, the poet says, "I have not seen the path that leads towards perfection."  This implies that the poet is visualising himself as a seeker who does not know which road to take in his spiritual life.  Then he says, "Only he who speaks from the summit can embrace perfection-day."  I wonder, why doesn't the poet say, "Only he who has reached the summit can embrace perfection-day"?  He says "speaks".  That almost implies that once we have reached the summit of spiritual perfection, we have to speak, or reveal what we are.  If we don't manifest our divine realities, we cannot embrace "perfection-day".  I like the last lines: "In him the success-life and the progress-soul together shall stay to feed the face of the ever-transcending satisfaction-sun."  I notice that he says "face" of the "satisfaction-sun".  He doesn't simply say "satisfaction-sun".  I notice in Guru's teachings that sun does not always mean the manifesting sun; it can also refer to high, esoteric realities that are not necessarily automatically manifested.  Take for example the line from "The Absolute": "I am mute in the core of the sun."  He is silent in the sun's core, so the realities he is experiencing are extraordinary, and also remote and supremely privileged.  So, the "satisfaction-sun" by itself is not necessarily a manifested reality.  But by saying "to feed the face of the ever-transcending satisfaction-sun" the Master is once again saying that real perfection and real satisfaction come only from the complete manifestation of divinity on earth.  For that the sun assumes a "face" and becomes a benevolent, tangilbe reality for human beings in the same way that a great spiritual Master assumes an earthly cloak and a human face for people to approach and receive from him.  It's a masterful poem, concise for the present age, but also smacking of the ancient Vedas.


        --Mahiruha


      • sumangali_m
        Congratulations, Mahiruha, on your amazing achievement of learning Transcendence-Perfection by heart! “By heart” seems an especially appropriate expression
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 13, 2015
          Congratulations, Mahiruha, on your amazing achievement of learning Transcendence-Perfection by heart! “By heart” seems an especially appropriate expression in your case, as you strive for such a deep understanding and appreciation of Guru's poetry. I was happy not to have missed your excellent recitation during Celebrations.

          Personally, I find learning poems incredibly difficult – much harder than learning songs – so I am all the more astounded by your achievement. Thank you for sharing your tip of dividing the poems into themes.

          Sumangali

          P.S. Being halfway through my forties, I consider myself something of an authority on that subject, and have found them rather good so far. I wouldn't say your upcoming birthday is any cause for alarm – quite the contrary. Many happy returns!
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