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Re: The galaxy of stars

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  • kamalakanta47
    Dear Morris, thanks for that wonderful spiritual and literary analysis of Sri Chinmoy s poem. However, as I thought about it after reading your comment, one
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 31, 2003
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      Dear Morris, thanks for that wonderful spiritual and literary analysis
      of Sri Chinmoy's poem.

      However, as I thought about it after reading your comment, one thing
      more struck me. Perhaps it is not just that God wants us to see light
      and darkness in Him, but to see Him as light and darkness. After all,
      we all agree we live in this vast universe. Now, the word universe
      comes from the union of two Latin words. The prefix uni/ meaning
      "one" and the word veritas, which means "truth". So the word universe
      means "one Truth." Which Truth? God the Creator and God the Creation.
      God in the process of involution and evolution. God in His Universal
      reality, as well as His Transcendental Reality, above the pairs of
      opposites. Again, He is telling us that He is the pairs of opposites
      Himself, for there is nothing which is not God. Nothing exists or can
      exist outside of God.

      This is why this is the only sentence in God's entire Autobiography.
      He is telling us that He is everything, and not only in everything.

      Joy to all! Kamalakanta





      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, morrisklein27
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > ]
      >
      > There is only one sentence
      > In God's entire Autobiography:
      > "The galaxy of stars
      > And the darkest night
      > Are inseparably one."
      >
      >
      > This is an example of a poem by Sri Chinmoy which requires us to use
      > our heart and our intuition to understand it instead of our thinking
      > mind. If we are strictly rational, then we will reject the message
      > of this poem out of hand. How can the darkest night and the star-
      > filled galaxies ever be "inseparably one"?
      >
      > But if we read the poem a few times, it will open its inner realities
      > to us. Darkness and light are of course the same thing in the eyes
      > of the Supreme. The Supreme loves everything and everybody. We
      > cannot say that the Supreme loves only people who are religious or
      > spiritual. The Supreme loves the divinity in all human beings, and
      > therefore it doesn't matter to Him whether some people may be
      > confused or doubtful. His love is exactly the same.
      >
      > Another meaning I find in the poem is that "the darkest night" is the
      > perfect frame for "the galaxy of stars". We don't appreciate the
      > millions of beautiful stars when the sun is shining. Only when the
      > sky is dark and vacant can we see the stars. So, maybe darkness has
      > its value in making us appreciate light more.
      >
      > If the poem is an autobiography of God, I find it interesting that
      > nowhere in the poem is the word "I". "The galaxy of stars and the
      > darkest night" are being described. God is not speaking about
      > himself, directly. Perhaps God is saying that what He is cannot be
      > defined or described in rational terms. If we want to understand
      > God, the identity and the personality of God, we have to meditate on
      > the mystery of how light and darkness can be the same.
      >
      > When I repeat this poem a few times out loud, I notice a lot of 's'
      > sounds. I also notice a lot of long vowel sounds. The poem requires
      > a lot of breath to say it.
      >
      > As I think about it, I begin to wonder if the poem may be about the
      > nature of purity. The stars remind me of purity. Sri Chinmoy says
      > that pure people will see everybody as pure, and impure people will
      > never see other people as pure. To have purity really means to have
      > oneness with everyone. Darkness is impurity. Darkness will always
      > fight against light to conquer it, or to dominate it. Light,
      > however, will try to embrace darkness and will make the darkness
      > remember that it, too, really is Light.
      >
      > If other people would like to offer their comments on this amazing
      > poem, I would be happy to read them.
      >
      >
      >
      > Yours,
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Morris
    • harmonyvision
      ... [poem by Sri Chinmoy] I like what Morris and Kamalakanta said about this poem. On those rare occasions when I have been in a blissful consciousness, I ve
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 6, 2004
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        Morris Klein wrote:

        > There is only one sentence
        > In God's entire Autobiography:
        > "The galaxy of stars
        > And the darkest night
        > Are inseparably one."

        [poem by Sri Chinmoy]

        I like what Morris and Kamalakanta said about this poem. On those rare
        occasions when I have been in a blissful consciousness, I've noticed
        that God's presence seems to announce itself in everything. It's like
        "Duh!, so that's what a flower means. And that was there all along?"
        From a higher consciousness everything seems to signify God's presence
        and illustrate His nature.

        I remember once meditating in a park and overhearing two people engaged
        in ordinary conversation. Yet as I meditated more deeply, they seemed
        to be reciting holy words from some sacred book.

        From a higher consciousness, spiritual truths seem to reveal themselves
        spontaneously. I had never studied Zen Buddhism very seriously, or done
        much work with koans, but when I was in a blissful consciousness I
        found myself saying "omigod, so THAT'S the sound of one hand
        clapping..." I remember listening to some sacred choral music and
        hearing only one voice -- but as a kind of game, the voice had adopted
        many different tones, which were projections of the one Voice.

        What's this got to do with the poem? You can take the night sky as a
        canopy for barbecues and baseball games, or as a beautiful painting.
        But does it have any deeper spiritual significance?

        Without the galaxy of stars, the primordial darkness is like the
        formless and silent aspect of the Supreme, like non-existence. The
        galaxy of stars is like the creation bursting forth, and the billions
        of created souls. Even though some of these stars live for billions of
        years, they are only flickers on the screen of Eternity. Their life
        span is nothing compared to the Soul of God.

        The primordial darkness and the galaxy of stars give meaning to each
        other. It is only by virtue of the one that we perceive the other. They
        are like obverse and reverse of the same coin. Together, they make up
        "one Truth, one Life, one Face" (to quote from Sri Chinmoy's
        "Invocation").

        The Soul of God is not some dry philosophy, it is living and vibrant.
        And when we look up at the night sky, we may spontaneously perceive the
        vastness of this great Soul, from the fathomless depths of its silence,
        to the measureless heights of its creative splendour. And in the way
        that the stars wink at us, there is even a hint of Cosmic Humour...

        In one of his plays from the collection "Siddartha Becomes The Buddha,"
        speaking through the character of Kshema, Sri Chinmoy writes:

        "Nobody can count the grains of sand on the bank of the Ganges or weigh
        the water in the ocean. Similarly, when you enter into Nirvana, there
        Bliss is infinite. It cannot be measured, weighed or counted. It is
        unfathomable. In that highest realm of Bliss we see the meeting place
        of existence and non-existence. There non-existence and existence are
        inseparable, indescribable."

        Is the night sky a kind of universal koan which, when pondered from the
        right consciousness, reveals to us the nature of existence and non-
        existence? To come full circle:

        There is only one sentence
        In God's entire Autobiography:
        "The galaxy of stars
        And the darkest night
        Are inseparably one."

        - Sri Chinmoy
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