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Re: Greyfriar's Bobby: A Small Scottish Saint

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  • sumangali_m
    Dear Michael Mulling has not brought me sufficient words with which to respond, but I bring you thanks at least, lest my dallying mumbles discourtesy on my
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 2, 2007
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      Dear Michael

      Mulling has not brought me sufficient words with which to respond, but
      I bring you thanks at least, lest my dallying mumbles discourtesy on
      my behalf.

      To me personally this is one of the most powerfully inspiring messages
      of many powerfully inspiring messages you have offered here in recent
      weeks (or even years). Odd then that such a literary inspiration has
      rendered me almost wordless. I am sure my dumb state will be
      temporary, or your kindness will be wasted :-)

      I had not seen the poem you cite from Sri Chinmoy. Unique! Arresting!
      I have always noted how Sri Chinmoy suited any colour. He also had so
      many aspects: in turn fatherly, grandfatherly, even motherly, friendly
      or as a tiny child. Just so in writing he may wear so many voices,
      each as enchanting and natural as the next.

      Sumangali


      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, assistantmummer
      <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Sumangali,
      >
      > Your writing is like the sun. It shines so consistently that at times
      > we may take it for granted. But it does our hearts good, and we would
      > sadly miss the loss of its rays. Who can keep up with your brilliance?
      > And whose day is not brightened to see you on your appointed rounds,
      > traveling around the countryside, noticing for us details that we
      > would miss, and describing them more clearly than our own eyes could
      > see them?
      >
      > In his play, The Sacred Fire, Sri Chinmoy assembles a cast of
      > luminaries from American history. The Soul of America then asks each
      > of them to reprise one immortal contribution. For Emily Dickinson,
      > Guru chooses this poem:
      >
      > "If I can stop one heart from breaking,
      > I shall not live in vain;
      > If I can ease one life the aching,
      > Or cool one pain,
      > Or help one fainting robin
      > Unto his nest again,
      > I shall not live in vain."
      >
      > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sacred-fire/14.html
      >
      > One can almost imagine that he first read it in his ashram days, and
      > that it informed his own ideal of Compassion.
      >
      > Elsewhere, he describes some of Dickinson's poems as expressing "the
      > mature wisdom of a Christian saint."
      >
      >
      http://www.poetseers.org/early_american_poets/emily_dickinson/kind_words_on_emily_dickinson
      >
      > These days, our own little community knows some lonely houses, but it
      > also has its share of saints - those who by their very words and
      > presence help many fainting robins.
      >
      > Michael
      >
      > P.S. Given how often Sri Chinmoy wrote about Emily Dickinson, we may
      > well ask if any of his poems reflect her influence. When I first read
      > the following, and got to the last word of the last line, something
      > said "Dickinson!":
      >
      > "I shall not stop.
      > I must gallop.
      > I am God-duty's
      > Truth-serving,
      > Life-awakening,
      > Lustre-horse.
      > In tune with God's
      > cosmic muse,
      > Rhythmic dance,
      > My heart shall hop."
      >
      > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/cry-smile/101.html
      >
    • sumangali_m
      Thank you so much, Arpan. It is truly an honour for me to share my experiences here. Thank you for offering so much to this group in recent weeks. I am sure
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 2, 2007
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        Thank you so much, Arpan. It is truly an honour for me to share my
        experiences here. Thank you for offering so much to this group in
        recent weeks. I am sure many, many people must benefit from the energy
        you bring. Oneness and strength are so precious, especially in the new
        and challenging circumstances since Guru's passing.

        Sumangali


        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, arpan_deangelo
        <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sumangali,
        > I have been to Scotland only once, about ten years ago. Edinburgh is
        my favorite city there and in the rest of Europe as well, although I
        have only been to Europe about four times. I always wanted to go back
        to Edinburgh but missed a few opportunities to do so.
        >
        > Your wonderful story took me back to Edinburgh in a very convincing
        and enjoyable way. Your ability to capture the essence of the
        environment and consciousness around you is remarkable. In the spirit
        and style of a true story-teller, you transport the reader through
        layered dimensions to be enchanted by the mystique and beauty of this
        world, from the mundane to the metaphysical.
        > Thank you again for taking the time to write in this way and
        contribute to this forum to inspire us all.
        >
        > Enchantingly,
        > Arpan
        >
      • assistantmummer
        ... No, that was my secret plan: to give such high praise that it would render you dumb. Now I can take over the world! Mya-ha-ha! But seriously... Sometimes I
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 8, 2007
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          Sumangali wrote:

          > Odd then that such a literary inspiration has
          > rendered me almost wordless. I am sure my dumb state
          > will be temporary, or your kindness will be wasted :-)

          No, that was my secret plan: to give such high praise that it would
          render you dumb. Now I can take over the world! Mya-ha-ha! But
          seriously...

          Sometimes I wonder if you really believe it when we tell you how much
          we enjoy your writings - how much we are helped by them. If you are
          now wordless, I hope it's because this time I've managed to persuade
          you of the truth of it. I am not flattering your human person, only
          giving honest thanks to your soul.

          You have written many touching tales from your childhood. Probably,
          when you lived at home and showed up at the dinner table, no one made
          a big fuss, applauded loudly, or praised you to the skies. (Maybe they
          only adjusted their mechanical pencils.) But you felt loved, and your
          very presence stirred something in their hearts.

          Here in our little circle, we long ago ran out of adjectives to praise
          your writings. But we don't really take them for granted, either. We
          just feel you are a beloved family member. When you sit down at our
          dinner table and serve up a literary repast, we feel complete. We take
          our communion supper together. We silently acknowledge your
          contribution with joy in our hearts. It is a joy that runs deeper than
          any words.

          Over the years, your poems and stories have become like streams
          running through our countryside. We cannot praise them because we
          cannot separate ourselves from them. We can only walk beside them,
          wade knee-deep in them, and say, "Yes, that is us!"

          Writing is something that comes very naturally to you. But sharing it,
          I guess, comes harder. I, for one, am very conscious that you do not
          have to share your writings. You could easily store them in an attic,
          or share them only with the silent Inner Reader. But you deserve our
          special thanks for having the courage to publish them. In message
          #21353, you wrote:

          > Mind you, ask me to speak alone publicly, or sing
          > into an audience — however forgiving — and you will
          > see the trembling mouse in me.

          It's impossible for me to think of such an heroic soul as in any way
          mouselike. But if you insist on foisting that imagery upon us, then I
          can only liken you to "The Mouse That Roared"! (And may I add: "Pass
          the Duchy on the Fenwick side...") But note this passage from a book
          review by Alison Lurie:

          "Behind many of the greatest and most joyful children's fantasies move
          the shadows of real and often unhappy events in their authors' lives.
          Many of Beatrix Potter's animals escape from claustrophobic domestic
          environments like that of her own respectably repressive Victorian
          parents. J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, like Barrie himself, never attains
          maturity, and must borrow or steal other people's children for his
          playmates. And E. B. White, who both as child and adult was described
          as resembling a mouse, made the hero of 'Stuart Little' a mouse born
          into a human family."

          http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/04/18/specials/rushdie-haroun.html

          > I have always noted how Sri Chinmoy suited any
          > colour. He also had so many aspects: in turn
          > fatherly, grandfatherly, even motherly, friendly or
          > as a tiny child.

          So very true! I have been letting loose dribs and drabs from my song
          honouring his Mahasamadhi. Sooner or later I will post the whole
          thing. But per your comments, here is more:

          "Orphan Madal,
          Spiritual father,
          Mother's compassion-heart."

          Apropos of nothing in particular, I will close with this couplet:

          Hope floats; cream rises
          Faster than despair surmises.

          For those who struggle with English: It means that when we despair, we
          think the rose in us will never bloom. But when we hope, we float
          above life's miseries; and the cream - the best in us - rises to the
          surface faster than we could have thought possible when we were in
          despair.

          Michael


          --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sumangali_m
          <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Michael
          >
          > Mulling has not brought me sufficient words with which to respond, but
          > I bring you thanks at least, lest my dallying mumbles discourtesy on
          > my behalf.
          >
          > To me personally this is one of the most powerfully inspiring messages
          > of many powerfully inspiring messages you have offered here in recent
          > weeks (or even years). Odd then that such a literary inspiration has
          > rendered me almost wordless. I am sure my dumb state will be
          > temporary, or your kindness will be wasted :-)
          >
          > I had not seen the poem you cite from Sri Chinmoy. Unique! Arresting!
          > I have always noted how Sri Chinmoy suited any colour. He also had so
          > many aspects: in turn fatherly, grandfatherly, even motherly, friendly
          > or as a tiny child. Just so in writing he may wear so many voices,
          > each as enchanting and natural as the next.
          >
          > Sumangali
        • sumangali_m
          Dear Michael Thank you for your most kind and very insightful message. There are so many things I could respond to. For want of a place to start, and by way of
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 10, 2007
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            Dear Michael

            Thank you for your most kind and very insightful message. There are so
            many things I could respond to. For want of a place to start, and by
            way of a brief reply for now, I have written a short humorous play
            based on Sri Chinmoy's story, The Seeker-Writer. I hope you will see
            it in an adjoining post soon.

            With best wishes, and heartfelt gratitude
            Sumangali
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