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Re: To Mahiruha, Nayak, Suren, Bell Ringers, Silent Readers

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  • mahiruha_27
    Michael, Thanks a lot for kindly mentioning us all. It was a real treat for us to meet you, too. I don t like Star Trek fans, though. But you don t seem to
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 31, 2007
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      Michael,

      Thanks a lot for kindly mentioning us all. It was a real treat for us
      to meet you, too. I don't like Star Trek fans, though. But you don't
      seem to be a Trekkie, so it's ok.

      And thanks for mentioning Bach's St. Matthew Passion- one of my very
      favourite pieces of music of all time.

      I like the St. Matthew Passion so much because I like Bach's
      simplicity and clarity. He expressed emotion like a child, in such a
      natural, honest way that everybody can understand and identify with him.

      I think Sri Chinmoy is another great example of a composer who has the
      innocent and sweet consciousness of a child. When I listen to his
      compositions, I find it's so easy to get lost in the emotional texture
      of the music. I don't need to know the meaning of the words, if they
      are songs, the meanings become apparent through the music.

      Sri Chinmoy, like Bach, composed songs that make me want to dance with
      joy and sob like a little kid at the same time. I am particularly
      fond of the songs he wrote just before the turn of the millennium in
      Brazil. As usual on his "vacations" Sri Chinmoy wrote hundreds and
      hundreds of songs that year. One of my favourites from that collection is entitled "Nutan Juger".


      I asked a Bangladeshi woman in the Centre to translate it for me and
      so the words correspond to something like this (and, please note, this
      is one hundred percent unofficial!):

      New age, new hope,
      The birth of a new dawn;
      I shall wake up
      With the yoga of worship-
      Holding the Feet
      Of the World-Mother.


      I sure wish Bach and Sri Chinmoy could have been contemporaries. I am
      sure Bach would have been astounded at the output of this simple,
      kind-hearted Indian saint.
    • bluebirds727
      To Mahiruha, Sri Chinmoy liked Bach very much. Have you heard Bach s Christmas Choral? It is exquisitely beautiful. ... collection is entitled Nutan Juger .
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 31, 2007
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        To Mahiruha,

        Sri Chinmoy liked Bach very much. Have you heard Bach's Christmas
        Choral? It is exquisitely beautiful.



        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, mahiruha_27
        <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Michael,
        >
        > Thanks a lot for kindly mentioning us all. It was a real treat for us
        > to meet you, too. I don't like Star Trek fans, though. But you don't
        > seem to be a Trekkie, so it's ok.
        >
        > And thanks for mentioning Bach's St. Matthew Passion- one of my very
        > favourite pieces of music of all time.
        >
        > I like the St. Matthew Passion so much because I like Bach's
        > simplicity and clarity. He expressed emotion like a child, in such a
        > natural, honest way that everybody can understand and identify with him.
        >
        > I think Sri Chinmoy is another great example of a composer who has the
        > innocent and sweet consciousness of a child. When I listen to his
        > compositions, I find it's so easy to get lost in the emotional texture
        > of the music. I don't need to know the meaning of the words, if they
        > are songs, the meanings become apparent through the music.
        >
        > Sri Chinmoy, like Bach, composed songs that make me want to dance with
        > joy and sob like a little kid at the same time. I am particularly
        > fond of the songs he wrote just before the turn of the millennium in
        > Brazil. As usual on his "vacations" Sri Chinmoy wrote hundreds and
        > hundreds of songs that year. One of my favourites from that
        collection is entitled "Nutan Juger".
        >
        >
        > I asked a Bangladeshi woman in the Centre to translate it for me and
        > so the words correspond to something like this (and, please note, this
        > is one hundred percent unofficial!):
        >
        > New age, new hope,
        > The birth of a new dawn;
        > I shall wake up
        > With the yoga of worship-
        > Holding the Feet
        > Of the World-Mother.
        >
        >
        > I sure wish Bach and Sri Chinmoy could have been contemporaries. I am
        > sure Bach would have been astounded at the output of this simple,
        > kind-hearted Indian saint.
        >
      • mahiruha_27
        Dear Bluebirds, I fully agree with you! It s an amazing piece. I ve never listened to it all the way through, so maybe today s as good as any other! Thank
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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          Dear Bluebirds,

          I fully agree with you! It's an amazing piece. I've never listened to it all the way through,
          so maybe today's as good as any other!

          Thank you for sharing this recommendation with me. I really appreciate it.

          Gratefully,

          Mahiruha


          --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, bluebirds727 <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > To Mahiruha,
          >
          > Sri Chinmoy liked Bach very much. Have you heard Bach's Christmas
          > Choral? It is exquisitely beautiful.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, mahiruha_27
          > <no_reply@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Michael,
          > >
          > > Thanks a lot for kindly mentioning us all. It was a real treat for us
          > > to meet you, too. I don't like Star Trek fans, though. But you don't
          > > seem to be a Trekkie, so it's ok.
          > >
          > > And thanks for mentioning Bach's St. Matthew Passion- one of my very
          > > favourite pieces of music of all time.
          > >
          > > I like the St. Matthew Passion so much because I like Bach's
          > > simplicity and clarity. He expressed emotion like a child, in such a
          > > natural, honest way that everybody can understand and identify with him.
          > >
          > > I think Sri Chinmoy is another great example of a composer who has the
          > > innocent and sweet consciousness of a child. When I listen to his
          > > compositions, I find it's so easy to get lost in the emotional texture
          > > of the music. I don't need to know the meaning of the words, if they
          > > are songs, the meanings become apparent through the music.
          > >
          > > Sri Chinmoy, like Bach, composed songs that make me want to dance with
          > > joy and sob like a little kid at the same time. I am particularly
          > > fond of the songs he wrote just before the turn of the millennium in
          > > Brazil. As usual on his "vacations" Sri Chinmoy wrote hundreds and
          > > hundreds of songs that year. One of my favourites from that
          > collection is entitled "Nutan Juger".
          > >
          > >
          > > I asked a Bangladeshi woman in the Centre to translate it for me and
          > > so the words correspond to something like this (and, please note, this
          > > is one hundred percent unofficial!):
          > >
          > > New age, new hope,
          > > The birth of a new dawn;
          > > I shall wake up
          > > With the yoga of worship-
          > > Holding the Feet
          > > Of the World-Mother.
          > >
          > >
          > > I sure wish Bach and Sri Chinmoy could have been contemporaries. I am
          > > sure Bach would have been astounded at the output of this simple,
          > > kind-hearted Indian saint.
          > >
          >
        • assistantmummer
          Mahiruha, I like it that in your inner world you are looking to bridge the universe of Bach with the universe of Sri Chinmoy. That is something like the Glass
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 8, 2007
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            Mahiruha, I like it that in your inner world you are looking to bridge
            the universe of Bach with the universe of Sri Chinmoy. That is
            something like the Glass Bead Game (a book for which the absent
            Adhiratha has shown a fondness).

            The bridges do exist. In my mind, one of those bridges is Sri
            Chinmoy's song "Khamo Karo." If you play this very slowly in a low
            octave on a church organ (or appropriate synthesizer patch), you will
            say "Aha! What a perfect theme for a Bach passacaglia!" (The
            passacaglia is a form similar to theme and variations.)

            Have you ever heard the recording of Sri Chinmoy playing a little of
            Bach's Minuet in G? It's from My Prayerful Salutations to the United
            Nations, Part V:

            http://www.radiosrichinmoy.org/radio/285/

            Just scroll down to track 13. Guru plays the Bach melody, then moves
            on to some of his own melodies quite transparently. It's a very sweet,
            warm recording.

            I know Sri Chinmoy liked Bach very much. I seem to remember reading
            that he said Bach really understood the value of repetition in music.
            (Don't quote me.)

            In Shambhu Neil Vineberg's book - Sri Chinmoy: The Silence-Sound - he
            writes:

            "In June, 1973, Sri Chinmoy traveled to India to visit his family and
            spent a large part of the summer there. Before he left, he asked
            Tanima to make him a tape of the Lotus Groves, Bengali Singers,
            various disciples performing his music, and two classical pieces by
            Bach. (...Bach pieces played by Dulal, Chandika, Tanima, and Prabhat...)"

            Sri Chinmoy also wrote this poem, based on a famous incident:

            Johann Sebastian Bach
            by Sri Chinmoy

            When the ignorance-prince
            Wants to instruct and guide the world,
            Specially the music-world,
            He speaks through a village organist:
            "This can only be the devil or Bach himself!"

            http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/music-ecstasy-heart-hunger/2.html

            So Mahiruha, here I should be resting, but you have me playing the
            Glass Bead Game!

            Affectionately,

            Michael

            --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, mahiruha_27
            <no_reply@...> wrote:
            >
            > Michael,
            >
            > Thanks a lot for kindly mentioning us all. It was a real treat for us
            > to meet you, too. I don't like Star Trek fans, though. But you don't
            > seem to be a Trekkie, so it's ok.
            >
            > And thanks for mentioning Bach's St. Matthew Passion- one of my very
            > favourite pieces of music of all time.
            >
            > I like the St. Matthew Passion so much because I like Bach's
            > simplicity and clarity. He expressed emotion like a child, in such a
            > natural, honest way that everybody can understand and identify with him.
            >
            > I think Sri Chinmoy is another great example of a composer who has the
            > innocent and sweet consciousness of a child. When I listen to his
            > compositions, I find it's so easy to get lost in the emotional texture
            > of the music. I don't need to know the meaning of the words, if they
            > are songs, the meanings become apparent through the music.
            >
            > Sri Chinmoy, like Bach, composed songs that make me want to dance with
            > joy and sob like a little kid at the same time. I am particularly
            > fond of the songs he wrote just before the turn of the millennium in
            > Brazil. As usual on his "vacations" Sri Chinmoy wrote hundreds and
            > hundreds of songs that year. One of my favourites from that
            collection is entitled "Nutan Juger".
            >
            >
            > I asked a Bangladeshi woman in the Centre to translate it for me and
            > so the words correspond to something like this (and, please note, this
            > is one hundred percent unofficial!):
            >
            > New age, new hope,
            > The birth of a new dawn;
            > I shall wake up
            > With the yoga of worship-
            > Holding the Feet
            > Of the World-Mother.
            >
            >
            > I sure wish Bach and Sri Chinmoy could have been contemporaries. I am
            > sure Bach would have been astounded at the output of this simple,
            > kind-hearted Indian saint.
            >
          • sharani_sharani
            Dear Michael, Even though you hint in this message to Mahiruha that you might ought to be resting, I am happy to see messages from you amongst us once again
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 8, 2007
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              Dear Michael,
              Even though you hint in this message to Mahiruha that you might ought
              to be resting, I am happy to see messages from you amongst us once
              again today. As you mentioned in one of your earlier messages to us
              that Sri Chinmoy told you he was praying for your good health shortly
              before he entered into Mahasamadhi, I know that our prayers have
              surely joined his after you mentioned not feeling well. It will be our
              collective delight if your stamina permits this renewed sharing of
              your extraordinary perspective no matter the subject. Invariably, I
              learn something new when reading your posts.

              Sharani


              --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, assistantmummer
              <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              > Mahiruha, I like it that in your inner world you are looking to bridge
              > the universe of Bach with the universe of Sri Chinmoy. That is
              > something like the Glass Bead Game (a book for which the absent
              > Adhiratha has shown a fondness).
              >
              > The bridges do exist. In my mind, one of those bridges is Sri
              > Chinmoy's song "Khamo Karo." If you play this very slowly in a low
              > octave on a church organ (or appropriate synthesizer patch), you will
              > say "Aha! What a perfect theme for a Bach passacaglia!" (The
              > passacaglia is a form similar to theme and variations.)
              >
              > Have you ever heard the recording of Sri Chinmoy playing a little of
              > Bach's Minuet in G? It's from My Prayerful Salutations to the United
              > Nations, Part V:
              >
              > http://www.radiosrichinmoy.org/radio/285/
              >
              > Just scroll down to track 13. Guru plays the Bach melody, then moves
              > on to some of his own melodies quite transparently. It's a very sweet,
              > warm recording.
              >
              > I know Sri Chinmoy liked Bach very much. I seem to remember reading
              > that he said Bach really understood the value of repetition in music.
              > (Don't quote me.)
              >
              > In Shambhu Neil Vineberg's book - Sri Chinmoy: The Silence-Sound - he
              > writes:
              >
              > "In June, 1973, Sri Chinmoy traveled to India to visit his family and
              > spent a large part of the summer there. Before he left, he asked
              > Tanima to make him a tape of the Lotus Groves, Bengali Singers,
              > various disciples performing his music, and two classical pieces by
              > Bach. (...Bach pieces played by Dulal, Chandika, Tanima, and
              Prabhat...)"
              >
              > Sri Chinmoy also wrote this poem, based on a famous incident:
              >
              > Johann Sebastian Bach
              > by Sri Chinmoy
              >
              > When the ignorance-prince
              > Wants to instruct and guide the world,
              > Specially the music-world,
              > He speaks through a village organist:
              > "This can only be the devil or Bach himself!"
              >
              > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/music-ecstasy-heart-hunger/2.html
              >
              > So Mahiruha, here I should be resting, but you have me playing the
              > Glass Bead Game!
              >
              > Affectionately,
              >
              > Michael
              >
              > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, mahiruha_27
              > <no_reply@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Michael,
              > >
              > > Thanks a lot for kindly mentioning us all. It was a real treat for us
              > > to meet you, too. I don't like Star Trek fans, though. But you don't
              > > seem to be a Trekkie, so it's ok.
              > >
              > > And thanks for mentioning Bach's St. Matthew Passion- one of my very
              > > favourite pieces of music of all time.
              > >
              > > I like the St. Matthew Passion so much because I like Bach's
              > > simplicity and clarity. He expressed emotion like a child, in such a
              > > natural, honest way that everybody can understand and identify
              with him.
              > >
              > > I think Sri Chinmoy is another great example of a composer who has the
              > > innocent and sweet consciousness of a child. When I listen to his
              > > compositions, I find it's so easy to get lost in the emotional texture
              > > of the music. I don't need to know the meaning of the words, if they
              > > are songs, the meanings become apparent through the music.
              > >
              > > Sri Chinmoy, like Bach, composed songs that make me want to dance with
              > > joy and sob like a little kid at the same time. I am particularly
              > > fond of the songs he wrote just before the turn of the millennium in
              > > Brazil. As usual on his "vacations" Sri Chinmoy wrote hundreds and
              > > hundreds of songs that year. One of my favourites from that
              > collection is entitled "Nutan Juger".
              > >
              > >
              > > I asked a Bangladeshi woman in the Centre to translate it for me and
              > > so the words correspond to something like this (and, please note, this
              > > is one hundred percent unofficial!):
              > >
              > > New age, new hope,
              > > The birth of a new dawn;
              > > I shall wake up
              > > With the yoga of worship-
              > > Holding the Feet
              > > Of the World-Mother.
              > >
              > >
              > > I sure wish Bach and Sri Chinmoy could have been contemporaries. I am
              > > sure Bach would have been astounded at the output of this simple,
              > > kind-hearted Indian saint.
              > >
              >
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