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Re: berry skins at longbeach

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  • beverly_canada
    Ah! This story of bear-ry skins at longbeach by Abhinabha - to laugh at oneself in a tight spot and bring smiles to others ... -B.
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 7, 2007
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      Ah!
      This story of "bear-ry" skins
      at longbeach by Abhinabha -
      to laugh at oneself in a tight spot
      and bring smiles to others ...

      -B.


      http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/
      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, abhinabha
      <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Beverly,
      >
      > That was one heck of a thriller! I noticed I was holding my breath
      > instinctively while reading your post. You should think about becoming
      > a suspense author, you have natural talent! I also thought the
      > aphorisms by Sri Chinmoy were very appropriate and well-chosen.
      >
      > Your story reminded me immediately of an experience I had about eleven
      > years ago, before I became Sri Chinmoy's student. I was camping on
      > Longbeach, along the West Coast of Vancouver Island - I'm sure you are
      > familiar with it. It was at the end of my exchange year in Canada and
      > one of my friends from home was visiting me. We were sleeping side by
      > side in a tent pitched on unforgivably uncomfortable stones.
      >
      > Longbeach happens to be bear country - big time bear country.
      >
      > One night I woke up in the middle of the night to a strange and
      > awkward sound. I froze into an immutable stiffness in my sleeping bag
      > as I heard a munching sound just behind our tent, combined with the
      > rushing of twigs and bushes. Too afraid to do anything I just lay
      > there listening with bated breath. Strangely, I felt no mortal fear,
      > just a mild, but persistent anxiety about something apparently
      > monstrous munching on berries behind our tent.
      >
      > Just that same evening we had visited a lecture held by a park ranger
      > about how to react to bears in the case of a surprise encounter. His
      > first piece of advice was to make lots of noise. "Make the bear aware
      > that you're there," he had sung over and over on his guitar, just to
      > let the message really sink in. I guess I failed the test on my first
      > examination. What could I do? I was a shielded city boy who believed
      > bears to be animals that live in cages and behind bars in zoos.
      > Besides, I was too scared to make any noise at all. 'If I start making
      > noise, he will notice we're there and eat us all up!' I thought I was
      > making some sense there.
      >
      > The park ranger's second piece of advice was that if ever you were
      > threatened by a brown bear - *not* and *never* a grizzly bear - you
      > should grunt at him and hit him on the nose. The bear would be
      > surprised, scared and turn around. Well have you ever! I was going to
      > hit a bear? Hmm, any alternatives?
      >
      > If, however, it happened to be a grizzly bear, you should lie down,
      > play dead and hope for the best. I thought I was doing pretty well
      > there already. Fortunately I didn't have to face any of these
      > challenges as the noise slowly backed off and away and I let myself
      > fall back to sleep.
      >
      > When I woke up next morning it almost seemed a dream. A bear was
      > behind our tent? But when I examined the bushes I noticed quite a few
      > branches were missing and I saw quiet a few others lying on the floor,
      > amidst a couple of crushed berry skins...
      >
      > I thanked my lucky stars.
      >
      > -Abhinabha
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, beverly_canada
      > <no_reply@> wrote:
      > >
      > > What do you think of when you think of meditation? Flowers, candles,
      > > perhaps the fragrance of incense? These items are often associated
      > > with spiritual practice and are recommended. But what about in
      > > practical life? What about in tight situations? Meditation and outer
      > > challenges, how might they mix? I had an opportunity to experience
      > > such a mix early one winter morning.
      > >
      > >
      > > 24 January 2005
      > >
      > > In the dark of a winter morning my meditation was nearing its end. I
      > > was silently beginning a song about not forgetting God. A smile was
      > > on my face. Perhaps I shifted.
      > >
      > > Heavy footfalls sounded on the forest floor outside my tent. Just
      > > outside my tent. Against the wall behind me - something brushed.
      > > There was a grunt reminiscent of the call of a grouse (a chicken-sized
      > > bird common in the local woods). I heard more sounds as if something
      > > were crashing against trees - not grouse weight - massive, the sounds
      > > of a large animal.
      > >
      > > I could feel the effects of adrenaline in my body, a rush of shaky
      > > energy and tingling particularly in my stomach and legs, but the
      > > joyful smile on my face did not immediately disappear. It flickered
      > > on and off, like the lights in a power surge, then held.
      > >
      > > A few thoughts: "Sometimes God comes in an unrecognized form." "If
      > > a bear's hibernation is interrupted it may die, for its energy stores
      > > are limited". (Bears had visited a half year earlier).
      > >
      > > I was not motionless during these thoughts. I proceeded to sing the
      > > song I had begun, out loud now, to alert the animal to my presence,
      > > but stopped. A thought came, that perhaps it sounded too sweet, too
      > > much like the call of potential prey. I switched to "Hey", in a voice
      > > as onerous as I could muster. I moved around, trying to sound big. I
      > > took my flashlight and shone it, first in flash mode, then on steady
      > > beam at the back wall of the tent. Then I paused, listening. More
      > > crashing against nearby trees, a tentative hope, "perhaps it has
      > > fled". Silence. Then - another grunt just on the other side of the
      > > nylon tent cloth. (In retrospect I realize there must have been more
      > > than one animal). The `animal' had not been scared off, perhaps it
      > > wouldn't be. Parts of me were now definitely afraid.
      > >
      > >
      > > My Lord,
      > > Will You protect me
      > > Whenever I am in danger?
      > > "My child,
      > > Danger gives no warning.
      > > Start immediately running
      > > Towards Me."
      > >
      > > Sri Chinmoy
      > >
      >
      http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sri-chinmoy-service-trees/part5/810.html
      > >
      > >
      > > I started praying for protection, calling on God, first silently, then
      > > out loud. I continued to try to scare away the unseen `source' of
      > > the noises. All the while I was endeavoring to maintain the
      > > consciousness of my meditation. Each second of aspiration, with an
      > > unknown number remaining, was (and is) precious. At some point I
      > > unzipped the side flap of my tent to look outside. It was still dark,
      > > but in the dimness I could make out no movement. Another grunt. The
      > > animal was still behind the tent. Close behind. I invoked words
      > > from a song written by Sri Chinmoy a month earlier: "Be brave. Be
      > > brave. No fear. No fear." I yelled, "Hey", some more. I clapped
      > > my hands. I dressed. I commanded, "Go away". Simultaneously I
      > > was trying to surrender inwardly, not letting up on my outer actions,
      > > but striving for as much inner progress as I could make second by
      > > second.
      > >
      > > (A prayer of gratitude for the experience and all it was giving me, my
      > > soul . Make a break for it? I would have to duck to get out the tent
      > > door and bend over to put on my shoes. Not yet. The name of a
      > > oneness-friend appeared. Throw it out. Only concentrate on the
      > > Eternal Friend. Pack the sleeping bag. "Make me brave enough to
      > > surrender to Your WIll, whatever it may be." Maybe the air hissing
      > > out of my mattress would scare it away. Packed. Still nothing
      > > visible outside. The names of the Mahabharata heroes Bishwa and Drona
      > > came to my mind from "Dyulok Chariye" a poem-song by Sri Chinmoy which
      > > I had been learning over Christmas. Exit now? No. Each act
      > right.)
      > >
      > > I said a prayer for before leaving home for the first time. I said it
      > > with great feeling and felt immensely grateful as the meditative
      > > consciousness, which had slipped, re-established itself. Then I
      > > unzipped the door, put my feet outside and slid them into my shoes.
      > > The sun had not yet risen. I saw no animals.
      > >
      > >
      > > He Discovered Compassion
      > >
      > > A narrow escape from death
      > > Made him wiser.
      > > He discovered compassion
      > > Inside his newly-increased gratitude-power.
      > >
      > > - Sri Chinmoy
      > >
      >
      http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sri-chinmoy-flower-flames/part92/92.html
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > In retrospect, I noticed the following: Despite a body primed with
      > > adrenaline, there were relatively few thoughts, a signature of
      > > meditation. There was aim for a good consciousness and surrender to
      > > God's Will, preferably with survival, but not simply for survival. My
      > > voice was steady. Actions came in natural sequence. The meditative
      > > consciousness, though it drifted during the action, re-established
      > > itself with a short prayer despite the unknown to be faced seconds
      > > later.
      > >
      > >
      > > Everybody's mind
      > > Has to be brave enough,
      > > Everybody's life
      > > Has to be brave enough
      > > To encounter the onslaught
      > > Of death-fear.
      > >
      > > Sri Chinmoy
      > >
      >
      http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sri-chinmoy-service-trees/part7/924.html
      > >
      > >
      > > Please don't think me unusually brave. In my ordinary consciousness I
      > > try, but may not always succeed. During a recent encounter when in a
      > > non-meditative consciousness I saw more `frightened animal fight or
      > > flight mode' than `soul at a possible nexus' in myself. The above
      > > steadiness was a result of the consciousness brought by the
      > > meditation and of the regular spiritual practices behind it - daily
      > > prayer, singing, spiritual reading and of course meditation itself. I
      > > feel fortunate to have an experience which highlighted some of the the
      > > outer effects of meditation.
      > >
      > >
      > > God wants to hear
      > > Your prayers now.
      > > He will have no time to listen
      > > To your deathbed prayers.
      > >
      > > Sri Chinmoy
      > >
      >
      http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sri-chinmoy-aspiration-plants/part4/32.html
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > The meditation I was blessed with in the above encounter is a fruit of
      > > the inner and outer guidance of my spiritual teacher Sri Chinmoy. I
      > > encourage any seeker who has not yet found his or her path or
      > > spiritual teacher, to look for one without delay. Every second
      counts.
      > >
      > >
      > > MAN FORGETS
      > >
      > > Man forgets
      > > That his vital is swayed by desires.
      > > Man forgets
      > > That his mind constantly wanders.
      > > Man forgets
      > > That his days on earth are short.
      > > Man forgets
      > > That his real needs are very few.
      > > Man forgets
      > > That he has only God to call his own,
      > > His very own.
      > >
      > > - Sri Chinmoy
      > > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sri-chinmoy-dance-life/part6/11.html
      > >
      > >
      > > Beverly
      > >
      >
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