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Madhur, Mahesh and Radika Part 1

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  • doriscott20002000
    It is not often that I meet people with such big hearts. Madhur, Mahesh and eleven year old daughter Radika are a new Indian family living in New York, Queens.
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 26, 2006
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      It is not often that I meet people with such big hearts. Madhur,
      Mahesh and eleven year old daughter Radika are a new Indian
      family living in New York, Queens. We (Four Russians from Moscow, one
      Hungarian and one Canadian women and me) were seven people staying at
      their place.

      Whenever we arrived from a meeting or other activities they would
      invite us for lunch, dinner or breakfast (always yummy Indian Food). I
      enjoyed sitting together at one big table communicating in different
      languages (and feeling the cheeks glowing from Indian Chai). It made
      me more and more aware of how the world grows together. Kamalika would
      speak Hindi to Mahesh while Madhur was talking to me in German, I
      spoke Russian to Julia and Julia eagerly practised her new learned
      English. Days went by.

      There were a few incidents I can't forget and would like to share with
      you all:

      Once I praised Madhur for her constant serving us (she even brought me
      a cup of Indian Chai to my room).

      I like the name Madhur (meaning sweetness) and all day long I would
      sing songs that contains the word "Madhur". So when I came home
      jumping down the stairs I sang cheerfully "Sure, sure Madhur sure desh
      bideshe gure berai, bhakti...e.t.c. Suddenly I noticed that Madhur was
      lying on one of the beds sleeping. I apologized for not having seen
      her before. It was the day the Russians had left in the afternoon.

      It was my last day in New York before leaving for Europe. We went to
      pick up Radika from the school bus. The sun was shining bright and we
      enjoyed peacefully leaning against some small wall and waiting and
      chatting. I was fully convinced she would be happy to see us waiting
      for her. What got off the school bus was a sad child that started
      crying when seeing her mom. With tears in her eyes she told her what
      happened: A girl who is also going by the same bus had tried to
      challenge her by saying in a nasty way: "I am Puerto Rican and Puerto
      Ricans don't like Indians." Usually she does not talk to this girl but
      today she replied: "That can't be true, I have a Puerto Rican friend."
      Marvellous answer!! The very presence of us in her house made her
      forget the incident soon. Smilingly she came up to me and said: "Next
      time I will tell her I am not Indian I am Spanish." I consoled her by
      saying: "Maybe there will be no next time ;-)."

      Doris
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