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To Pavitrata (was Re: Can This Be True?)

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  • sharani_sharani
    Boy this message really got the gears whirring up in my little brain! Lots to ponder that I really hadn t thought of in that way before... I like the nostalgia
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 28, 2006
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      Boy this message really got the gears whirring up in my little brain!
      Lots to ponder that I really hadn't thought of in that way before... I
      like the nostalgia joke too :-)

      In the first step to setting intimidation aside, I installed Photoshop
      onto my computer last night and started my way through some tutorials
      on it. Computer-related manuals have such a way of showing how
      impatient I am capable of being! I would much rather patiently wait to
      photograph animals in nature than to learn how to apply layers, etc.

      You have persuasively made your case however and I am now the (barely)
      proud owner of a pix with a blue frame around it and a quote by
      Chesterton underneath it. I might need it for the next issue of
      Inspiration-Letters...

      If you compile your photography advice, I'm sure Inspiration Group
      folks will "virtually" line up to pre-order it from Amazon UK. Thanks
      for taking the time to say, "Now class open to chapter 3 and let's
      move forward."

      Sharani

      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, pavitrata27
      <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Sharani,
      >
      > Well, Photoshop can do so much, it can be rather overwhelming.
      > It is also very expensive. A much better bet for you would be
      > Photoshop Elements, I use it at work; it will do everything you
      > need, and has a much simpler interface than Photoshop. You can go to
      > adobe.com and download a free 30 day trial version. The actual
      > product is $90 US.
      >
      > Even the best digital SLRs produce photos that look a little 'flat'
      > to someone who cut their teeth on print or slide film. I still can't
      > get used to it, and spend a lot of time getting photos the way I
      > want them look. Your editing program is as important as your camera.
      > More so, cameras will come and go, but with a good editing program
      > you can review photos you took long ago and see their possibilities
      > in a new light. Once you become reasonably competent with an editing
      > program that is what happens, your perception of photography
      > changes, and its then about possibilties within something you are
      > photographing or have photographed. Your taken photo becomes then
      > start of the creative process, whereas for most people once the
      > shutter is clicked the creative process is over for that photo.
      >
      > The problem I have with nostalgia, is just that it isn't what it
      > used to be. Joke. Sorry! Ouch! Seriously, you have to learn to look
      > at your photos as if they were taken by someone you didn't know.
      > Only then will you see their potential, or their strengths and
      > weaknesses. Nostalgia is seriously non-transferable. One persons
      > nostalgia is another persons boredom. It takes a profound creative
      > effort to lift nostalgia from the personal to the universal, which
      > is where it becomes art and can then touch the hearts and minds of
      > others.
      >
      > pip pip,
      > Pavitrata
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sharani_sharani
      > <no_reply@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear Pavitrata,
      > > Thanks for taking the time to review the Japan photos and offer
      > > comments. Your message may help me take that next leap. Since my
      > > gallery albums are burgeoning in size, maybe I will finally create
      > a
      > > much smaller collection of photos. Part of my problem is that
      > > "nostalgia" seems to be my middle name. Many of the photos are
      > links
      > > to such fond memories that I'm reluctant to file them away. Or by
      > > keeping my earliest stuff it allows a "graphic" comparison of "from
      > > where to where" I've come. Yet last night I had this dream that
      > > someone was holding up an extension cord and saying, "You are using
      > > this for your computer?!" I answered yes sheepishly because it was
      > the
      > > same cord I had previously used for an old electric typewriter. The
      > > gist of it all was that I was supposed to be using a much stronger
      > > power strip to hook the equipment up to the outlet. I guess this
      > was
      > > my symbolic assimilation of your advice... :-)
      > >
      > > I've been feeling more and more like I probably cannot avoid any
      > > longer eschewing more sophisticated editing software. For some
      > reason,
      > > Photoshop intimidates me. I have this idea I will need an actual
      > class
      > > or study of it to use it properly. However, when I look at
      > examples of
      > > "fixes" in the Popular Photography magazine that our library
      > receives
      > > I notice that if you can selectively lighten or darken certain
      > areas
      > > of a photo (among other things) this is a lot more useful than
      > what my
      > > Mac's iPhoto allows. I'm still not ready (financially if for no
      > other
      > > reason) to get an SLR camera yet. But I could actually invest some
      > > time in learning more about photography.
      > >
      > > Last but not least, I find it an interesting paradox about getting
      > > those good shots. The one of the monk walking at the shrine came
      > out
      > > good due mainly to cropping it. He was walking the grounds so fast
      > and
      > > Virangini and I were practically running after him to try to take
      > his
      > > picture. He disappeared, then suddenly came back by and I took the
      > > photo quite haphazardly. And the boardwalk scene photo was almost
      > an
      > > afterthought as I made my way from the subway to Guru's hotel for
      > the
      > > evening function. I was trying to get a shot of surfers, then got
      > > distracted by a sunset happening to my right through the trees and
      > > between the hills - it seemed seem so appropos to have my only
      > sunset
      > > shot be on the night before we came home - and then I just quickly
      > > took two shots of the ladies sitting on the stones. I knew it
      > would be
      > > good though as I quickly took it.
      > >
      > > Maybe the moral of the story is like you say that practise makes
      > more
      > > perfect. But I still feel that photography has this delightfully
      > > random magical component that reminds one just how puny we are in
      > the
      > > big cosmic scheme of things. I mean that you got that shot of the
      > deer
      > > almost by accident and then couldn't ever replicate it despite
      > > searching it out makes me think that perhaps Doris is right after
      > all
      > > and photographers are at least distant cousins to magicians.
      > >
      > > And as I ramble on here for an eternity I will just finish by
      > saying
      > > that since encouragement was more than a distant cousin in my
      > younger
      > > days, I am truly grateful for your encouragement of me along with
      > > others who enjoy taking photographs.
      > >
      > > Sharani
      > >
      > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, pavitrata27
      > > <no_reply@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Sharani,
      > > >
      > > > Thank-you, and thanks also for the correct link, somehow the last
      > > > section of the long url didn't get copied as a link, even though
      > the
      > > > whole address is there.
      > > >
      > > > The little story is in the reply I sent to Doris.
      > > >
      > > > I spent a long time looking through your Japan photos, they show
      > > > your deep affection for all things Japonais. Indeed, your choice
      > of
      > > > the Kamakura boardwalk photo is, IMHO, absolutely correct; it is
      > the
      > > > best of all the pictures; a superb photo, one to be printed and
      > > > framed. It would benefit from a very thin border, just to give it
      > > > that zing, graphically. Tsurugaoka shrine2 is also well worth
      > > > enlarging and printing, another excellent one, I also like the
      > big
      > > > flower photo, the one from the side, it would make a delightful
      > > > painting.
      > > >
      > > > It is really great to see you developing so well as a
      > photographer,
      > > > from first tentative beginnings to your now joyful and confident
      > > > exploration.
      > > >
      > > > Once you have taken photos like the Kamakura boardwalk and
      > > > Tsurugoaka shrine2 pix, you actually set new standards for
      > yourself,
      > > > and go beyond what you have already achieved. Photos like that
      > are
      > > > seldom happy accidents, they are the end result of all the photos
      > > > you have taken so far, or even things you have seen as possible
      > > > photos. What you now need to do is be more ruthless with your
      > other
      > > > photos, and raise the standard for what is a keeper or a sleeper,
      > > > i.e., which ones you present to the world and which ones you file
      > > > under 'OK, but no gold star'. You will end up with less photos,
      > of
      > > > course, but you will have a deeper artistic satisfaction from
      > your
      > > > own refined discernment.
      > > >
      > > > Oh, yes, and us Leos need only the flimsiest of excuses to hand
      > out
      > > > advice.
      > > >
      > > > pip-pip
      > > > Pavitrata
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [We all treasure so much your advice. A most heartfelt thank
      > you.]
      > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      > > >
      > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sharani_sharani
      > > > <no_reply@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Me too! I just saw this photo today and was wanting to write
      > and
      > > > > entreat Pavitrata to tell us the story behind this photograph.
      > I
      > > > > wonder why your link didn't work Doris? I'll try it again here
      > > > below:
      > > > > http://www.srichinmoycentre.org/gallery/members/pavitrata/the-
      > > > enchanted-forest.jpg.html
      > > > >
      > > > > Maybe we have to make a url shortcut? We'll see. It's always
      > time
      > > > well
      > > > > spent to just browse in Pavitrata's gallery starting from the
      > > > > beginning. And I'm shamelessly wondering if he likes
      > my "Kamakura
      > > > > Boardwalk Scene" photo which is somewhat ironically one of my
      > > > favorite
      > > > > Japan pictures...
      > > > >
      > > > > Sharani
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Pavitrata to tell u--- In
      > Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com,
      > > > > doriscott20002000 <no_reply@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Pavitrata, are you a magician or are they stuffed?
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > http://www.srichinmoycentre.org/gallery/members/pavitrata/the-
      > > > > > enchanted-forest.jpg.html
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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