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Re: sublime passage by Emerson

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  • sharani_sharani
    I m approaching the infamous (to me) blackboard to diagram some sentences but my memories of how to do it are postively fossilized! You and Niriha are
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2005
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      I'm approaching the infamous (to me) blackboard to diagram some
      sentences but my memories of how to do it are postively fossilized!
      You and Niriha are definitely the President and Vice-President of the
      committee to round up wayward writers. Arpan's reply about his typo is
      funny. He and I both are the latest pupils. :-)

      Sharani

      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sarah_inseattle
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Reply to myself?
      >
      > Wait a minute, I no sooner hit the "send" button when I realized the
      > word "with" was still "with" me... Nice typo I had in there, too...
      > (no "x" in "example")
      >
      > Well the point is, when I'm not sure of the correct grammar, I just
      > make up a new sentence that has a little different structure! Beg
      > the question all together!
      >
      > "which I also resonate with" or
      > "with which I also resonate" or
      > "which resonates with me" :-)
      >
      > Aw forget it!!!!!
      >
      > Sarah
      > Seattle
      > (smiling, with eyes cast heavenward)
      >
      >
      > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sarah_inseattle
      > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hey Sharani,
      > >
      > > That syndicated columnist who writes about grammar in the
      > newspaper
      > > every week (Kirkpatrick or something?) says there are times when
      > it
      > > sounds better to end a sentence with a preposition. I agree! I
      > don't
      > > mind, "...which I resonate with."
      > >
      > > However, a trick I have found in such cases is to find a way to
      > > write the sentence to avoid the danger area all together! If you
      > > get rid of "with" there is no problems with where to place it...(!)
      > >
      > > "...a stellar eample of his Transcendentalist philosophy, which
      > > resonates with me."
      > >
      > > That's just the way my sneaky mind works when I fear being watched
      > > by the Grammar Patrol... :-)
      > >
      > > Smiles,
      > > Sarah
      > > Seattle
      > >
      > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, niriha7
      > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Dear Sharani,
      > > >
      > > > You wrote:
      > > >
      > > > "Your passage from Emerson's writings is a stellar example of
      > > his
      > > > Transcendentalist philosophy that I also resonate with (uh-
      > oh
      > > here
      > > > comes the preposition police!)"
      > > >
      > > > What if you were to put it this way:
      > > >
      > > > >Your passage from Emerson's writings is a stellar example of
      > > > >his Transcendentalist philosophy with which I also resonate.
      > > >
      > > > I'm sorry. It is just my mood today. I am finding it
      > impossible
      > > to
      > > > be serious.
      > > >
      > > > ^ ^
      > > > @ @
      > > > \_/
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > By the way, I would like to echo your praise of the home page for
      > > > Srichinmoycentre.org. It is great to have such easy to use
      > links.
      > > > And the links do indeed seem as limbs on a tree - a banyan tree
      > in
      > > fact.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sharani_sharani
      > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Terri,
      > > > >
      > > > > This is ironic that we are communicating more on the
      > Inspiration
      > > Group
      > > > > than in person even though we almost spent time together a
      > > couple of
      > > > > days ago! Your passage from Emerson's writings is a stellar
      > > example of
      > > > > his Transcendentalist philosophy that I also resonate with (uh-
      > > oh here
      > > > > comes the preposition police!) I find the American
      > > Transcendentalists
      > > > > of the 19th century (the most famous being Emerson, Thoreau and
      > > > > Margaret Fuller) to be a fascinating topic and even mention
      > them
      > > in my
      > > > > photo contributor credit on poetseers.org. Were we still living
      > > > > together when I was slowly making my way through the seminal
      > > Emerson
      > > > > biography by John McAleer? The Transcendentalists looked to
      > > Nature for
      > > > > their sense of divinity and felt it was replete with symbols
      > and
      > > > > messages. Thanks for sharing this passage - it really sums up
      > > > > transcendentalism nicely.
      > > > >
      > > > > Sharani
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sarah_inseattle
      > > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Terri, this is *so beautiful* and moving! It takes me back
      > to
      > > my
      > > > > > New England childhood, but also to recent backpacking trips
      > in
      > > the
      > > > > > Olympic Rain Forest.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Yes, in the woods and wilderness, I feel those currents of
      > the
      > > > > > Universal Being flowing through me. I never knew the words
      > to
      > > > > > describe it. But I know it is God.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Thank you so much for posting it.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Sarah
      > > > > > Seattle
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, carr_terri
      > > > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I have long treasured this passage by Emerson describing
      > his
      > > > > > > mystical experiences in nature. Many years ago, I found a
      > > copy of
      > > > > > > this excerpt amongst my younger sister's school papers. I
      > > was so
      > > > > > > moved by it, I had to have a copy. For years I kept my
      > > tattered
      > > > > > > copy amongst my treasured books and would reread it every
      > > once in
      > > > > > a
      > > > > > > while.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Anyway, I always feel it is one of the most perfect
      > > depictions of
      > > > > > > what meditation really is and that no student of
      > > spirituality can
      > > > > > > help but be inspired by these words...enjoy! Terri
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > "The Transcendental Eyeball"...
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Crossing a bare common, in snow puddles, at twilight,
      > under
      > > a
      > > > > > > clouded sky, without having in my thoughts any occurrence
      > of
      > > > > > special
      > > > > > > good fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am
      > > glad to
      > > > > > > the brink of fear. In the woods too, a man casts off his
      > > years,
      > > > > > as
      > > > > > > the snake his slough, and at what period soever of life,
      > is
      > > always
      > > > > > a
      > > > > > > child. In the woods, is perpetual youth. Within these
      > > plantations
      > > > > > > of God, a decorum and sanctity reign, a perennial festival
      > > is
      > > > > > > dressed, and the guest sees not how he should tire of them
      > > in a
      > > > > > > thousand years. In the woods, we return to reason and
      > faith.
      > > There
      > > > > > I
      > > > > > > feel that nothing can befall me in life, -- no disgrace,
      > no
      > > > > > > calamity, (leaving me my eyes,) which nature cannot
      > repair.
      > > > > > Standing
      > > > > > > on the bare ground, -- my head bathed by the blithe air,
      > and
      > > > > > > uplifted into infinite space, -- all mean egotism
      > vanishes.
      > > I
      > > > > > become
      > > > > > > a transparent eye-ball; I am nothing; I see all; the
      > > currents of
      > > > > > the
      > > > > > > Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or
      > particle
      > > of
      > > > > > God.
      > > > > > > The name of the nearest friend sounds then foreign and
      > > accidental:
      > > > > > > to be brothers, to be acquaintances, -- master or servant,
      > > is then
      > > > > > a
      > > > > > > trifle and a disturbance. I am the lover of uncontained
      > and
      > > > > > immortal
      > > > > > > beauty. In the wilderness, I find something more dear and
      > > connate
      > > > > > > than in streets or villages. In the tranquil landscape,
      > and
      > > > > > > especially in the distant line of the horizon, man beholds
      > > > > > somewhat
      > > > > > > as beautiful as his own nature. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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