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Marathon Training

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  • salil_wilson
    Anyone planning on running a marathon in the near or distant future might like to visit http://www.srichinmoyraces.us/ and take a look at Seven Steps to a
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 12, 2003
      Anyone planning on running a marathon in the near or distant future might
      like to visit http://www.srichinmoyraces.us/ and take a look at Seven Steps to
      a Successful Marathon, by Arpan DeAngelo.

      It is available online or as a pdf.

      Happy training.

      Salil
    • karen_met
      Its great to have a new goal to work towards soon after running a marathon. It is just over a month since my last marathon and I would definately would not be
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 1, 2005
        Its great to have a new goal to work towards soon after running a
        marathon. It is just over a month since my last marathon and I would
        definately would not be pushing myself that hard if I didn't have
        another race to train for. The Melbourne Half-Marathon is a week
        away, and I feel unprepared but greatful for the opportunity to try
        and improve on my half marathon time!
        Has anyone else set new training goals??
      • arpan_deangelo
        Training goals and recovery time:For all serious marathoners, Karen, I agree that it is a good idea to have new goals soon after running a marathon. It is a
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 2, 2005
          Training goals and recovery time:For all serious marathoners,

          Karen, I agree that it is a good idea to have new goals soon after
          running a marathon. It is a good idea to keep your running goals
          spaced out regularly or one can get quite lazy, 'resting on their
          laurels' so to speak.
          But caution must be taken to recover properly from a marathon and not
          to over train or strain oneself too soon after a hard race. Of course,
          how soon depends uniquely on each individual.

          I myself was also quite inspired by the Self-Transcendence Marathon
          this August as it gave me confidence that I can get back into decent
          marathon racing shape. I set some new goals for myself and after a few
          weeks recovery I ran a 20 KM race in Connecticut to keep up my
          enthusiasm and conditioning. A few of us in New York are planning to
          run the Philadelphia Marathon in November, so I started marathon
          training again.

          Unfortunately, as one gets older, the recovery time is longer and we
          have to be even more careful not to get injured. Overtraining is
          dangerous enough for any runner as it can lead to injuries which put a
          damper on your running and training. But in middle age, injuries are
          even more frustrating as they take a lot more work to overcome and heal.

          The point is that I did injure or strain my achilles tendon soon after
          the 20K race and then a fast 2 mile race the next weekend. I had to
          stop running completely for a few weeks and I am trying to stay in
          shape with cross-training: cycling and swimming whenever I can. This
          takes more time and effort to train as one must find a pool and good
          roads, etc.

          So careful planning is important in training for your next big race.
          But just as important is proper recovery. Stretching, massage,
          cross-training and good nutrition all can help to prevent the
          unfortunate and painful experiences of race related injuries.
          Not to scare anyone from training or racing marathons, but just to
          make people aware that they should become very aware of their own
          body's ability to heal and to re-strengthen after the stress of a hard
          marathon or Ultra-marathon for that matter.

          I also try to make that point clear in my 'Seven Steps to a Successful
          Marathon' training program which you can access on the SCMT website.
          So keep inspired and in shape if you really love running, but also
          have some compassion for the body and its own unique characteristics.

          For all you youngsters out there(at this point I consider anyone under
          50 years old as 'youngsters'), keep your aspiration and enthusiasm for
          training and racing alive by staying in shape and racing regularly.
          Be careful of injuries and be aware of how to recover and when to back
          off.
          For older runners, I advise never to give up, but at the same time to
          be even more careful about the ambition to push the body beyond its
          ability to recover properly. Running and racing is good for the soul,
          but maybe harmful for the 'soles' or other parts of the body as well
          if one is not careful enough and aware of their own limitations.

          Happy training, racing and recovery to all those who aspire and strive
          to manifest all the dynamism and spiritual energy they can through the
          physical. Hope to see some of you, young and older, out on a race
          course very soon.

          Patiently trying to recover,
          Arpan



          --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, karen_met
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > Its great to have a new goal to work towards soon after running a
          > marathon. It is just over a month since my last marathon and I would
          > definately would not be pushing myself that hard if I didn't have
          > another race to train for. The Melbourne Half-Marathon is a week
          > away, and I feel unprepared but greatful for the opportunity to try
          > and improve on my half marathon time!
          > Has anyone else set new training goals??
        • snehashila2
          Well, Arpan, sorry you are slightly injured but know that you will be out there with all the youngsters very soon again. Just wanted to encourage those who are
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 4, 2005
            Well, Arpan, sorry you are slightly injured but know that you will be out there with all the
            youngsters very soon again.

            Just wanted to encourage those who are past their 70s that you can continue on with your
            marathon training by *walking* every day at least 2 miles. Then at least one day -- I
            usually do this on the weekend -- do one long walk of over an hour. In excellent weather I
            might even go well beyond an hour. Of course walking the 2 Mile Self Transcendence Race
            on Saturday mornings is part of your training. This will put you in fine enough physical
            shape so that when the next Rockland State Park Marathon comes around next year, you
            will be able to join me in doing the Half Marathon -- I've done it the past 4 years now. It's
            a beautiful course and one that is inspiring since you will no doubt see Sri Chinmoy every
            time you finish a lap. Keep moving!

            Happy trails to you!
            Snehashila



            --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, arpan_deangelo <no_reply@y...>
            wrote:
            > Training goals and recovery time:For all serious marathoners,
            >
            > Karen, I agree that it is a good idea to have new goals soon after
            > running a marathon. It is a good idea to keep your running goals
            > spaced out regularly or one can get quite lazy, 'resting on their
            > laurels' so to speak.
            > But caution must be taken to recover properly from a marathon and not
            > to over train or strain oneself too soon after a hard race. Of course,
            > how soon depends uniquely on each individual.
            >
            > I myself was also quite inspired by the Self-Transcendence Marathon
            > this August as it gave me confidence that I can get back into decent
            > marathon racing shape. I set some new goals for myself and after a few
            > weeks recovery I ran a 20 KM race in Connecticut to keep up my
            > enthusiasm and conditioning. A few of us in New York are planning to
            > run the Philadelphia Marathon in November, so I started marathon
            > training again.
            >
            > Unfortunately, as one gets older, the recovery time is longer and we
            > have to be even more careful not to get injured. Overtraining is
            > dangerous enough for any runner as it can lead to injuries which put a
            > damper on your running and training. But in middle age, injuries are
            > even more frustrating as they take a lot more work to overcome and heal.
            >
            > The point is that I did injure or strain my achilles tendon soon after
            > the 20K race and then a fast 2 mile race the next weekend. I had to
            > stop running completely for a few weeks and I am trying to stay in
            > shape with cross-training: cycling and swimming whenever I can. This
            > takes more time and effort to train as one must find a pool and good
            > roads, etc.
            >
            > So careful planning is important in training for your next big race.
            > But just as important is proper recovery. Stretching, massage,
            > cross-training and good nutrition all can help to prevent the
            > unfortunate and painful experiences of race related injuries.
            > Not to scare anyone from training or racing marathons, but just to
            > make people aware that they should become very aware of their own
            > body's ability to heal and to re-strengthen after the stress of a hard
            > marathon or Ultra-marathon for that matter.
            >
            > I also try to make that point clear in my 'Seven Steps to a Successful
            > Marathon' training program which you can access on the SCMT website.
            > So keep inspired and in shape if you really love running, but also
            > have some compassion for the body and its own unique characteristics.
            >
            > For all you youngsters out there(at this point I consider anyone under
            > 50 years old as 'youngsters'), keep your aspiration and enthusiasm for
            > training and racing alive by staying in shape and racing regularly.
            > Be careful of injuries and be aware of how to recover and when to back
            > off.
            > For older runners, I advise never to give up, but at the same time to
            > be even more careful about the ambition to push the body beyond its
            > ability to recover properly. Running and racing is good for the soul,
            > but maybe harmful for the 'soles' or other parts of the body as well
            > if one is not careful enough and aware of their own limitations.
            >
            > Happy training, racing and recovery to all those who aspire and strive
            > to manifest all the dynamism and spiritual energy they can through the
            > physical. Hope to see some of you, young and older, out on a race
            > course very soon.
            >
            > Patiently trying to recover,
            > Arpan
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, karen_met
            > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > > Its great to have a new goal to work towards soon after running a
            > > marathon. It is just over a month since my last marathon and I would
            > > definately would not be pushing myself that hard if I didn't have
            > > another race to train for. The Melbourne Half-Marathon is a week
            > > away, and I feel unprepared but greatful for the opportunity to try
            > > and improve on my half marathon time!
            > > Has anyone else set new training goals??
          • erik_chicagocentre
            Dear Karen, Arpan, and Readers, I wholeheartedly agree with you that setting goals keeps you inspired. I also ran a marathon recently (Self-Transcendence
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 4, 2005
              Dear Karen, Arpan, and Readers,

              I wholeheartedly agree with you that setting goals keeps you
              inspired. I also ran a
              marathon recently (Self-Transcendence Marathon) and shortly
              afterwards felt that I needed
              a new goal. The next day I found my goal: the Chicago Lakefront
              50k/50m race (I'm
              opting for the 50k). This race takes place along the beautiful shore
              of the Great Lake
              Michigan and in sight of the impressive skyline of downtown Chicago.
              In the past I've
              really only raced once a year at the Self Transcendence Marathon,
              with a few two mile
              races thrown in here and there. So this is a totally new experience
              for me to surge ahead
              after the marathon with a new goal and a greater goal (in distance).
              I can't really express
              the immense inspiration, joy, determination, focus, dynamism and
              self-transcendence that
              I feel properly by these words alone. But I'm really so excited and
              delighted to be making
              progress in my running life.

              I'm running better now than ever and have made efforts to increase
              my mileage volume,
              and speed. I've done a couple of intense tempo runs and 1/2-mile
              repeat sessions, which
              is also an upgrade. Everything is increasing in magnitude so I've
              kept a careful eye to
              overtraining as Arpan advised, but I realize that it could be
              difficult for a relatively
              inexperienced runner such as myself to recognize the signs of
              overtraining lost in the zeal
              or love of the heightened running experience. I'll keep my fingers
              crossed and send a few
              prayers out for protection (and wisdom)!

              Today was my longest run before the race and I think I did about
              29-31 miles, I know
              this is too long when training for a 50k (which is about 31 miles)
              but I felt good and was
              getting so much joy that I wanted to keep going. Actually what
              happened was that I was
              nearing the downtown area and I had the desire to do a few miles in
              the city for flavor,
              which increased my pre-planned mileage. Then an interesting
              coincidence occurred as I
              was running along the Chicago River as it emptied into Lake
              Michigan; I ran into my next-
              door neighbor who happened to be doing construction at a high-rise
              apartment along the
              river there, which was valued at 1.2 million dollars (unbelievable!).
              We chatted for a while
              and he told me that he recently took up running and then commented
              that "you guys do a
              lot of running don't you" meaning the students of Sri Chinmoy. I
              can't help but feel that
              we inspired him to begin running on some level.

              So I'm currently totally enveloped in the running world; constantly
              thinking about
              running, reading about it, learning about nutrition and various gear
              and accessories, and
              of course just good old fashioned running itself. I've recently
              discovered Abichal's
              websites: http://elight47.bravejournal.com/ (a running blog) and
              www.multidays.com
              (sorry, I've forgotten how to make these links). I highly recommend
              these tremendously
              inspiring websites to any runner and I would like to give Abichal an
              enthusiastic e-high-
              five (or a simple thank you) for these truly important and
              informative sites.

              The inspiration-seed for all of this enthusiasm was planted about 7
              months ago when I
              learned about the World Harmony Run. I really wanted to participate
              and join the team so
              I immediately upped my mileage (in increments) to about 30-35
              miles/week per the advice
              of the U.S. Team Coordinator Atulya Berube. It was so refreshing to
              be running again
              regularly and I was prepping myself for the WHR. Of course my WHR
              experience was
              something unique and special, also challenging. It kept me in great
              running form. Then
              not long after my stint with the WHR I picked up the Chi Running book
              by Danny Dreyer
              which I found to be extremely useful for improving my running form
              and also just as a
              different approach and philosophy to and about running. My marathon
              training was
              intense in that I was focusing very intently on my form and style but
              not so much on speed
              and other quality types of workouts. I was content with just
              improving form and I was
              getting so much joy and peace from my new running style. I didn't
              run a fast marathon at
              all but I felt that this training was worth the effort and I
              definitely gained something from
              it.

              I also had another seed planted in the soil of my soul, I think it
              was April in New York
              when I purchased some of Abichal's Multiday Running Magazines that he
              publishes. I find
              the ultra-marathons and the multiday races fascinating and almost
              incomprehensible:
              these feats of human endurance that speak volumes on the strength and
              glory of the spirit
              manifesting through a finite human frame.

              Sri Chinmoy has a poem that goes:

              "Whatever is it go will go.
              Alas, why do I weep day and night
              in excruciating pangs?
              Whatever is to be achieved I shall achieve,
              Whether I want it or not,
              Yet no joy have I." [unofficial]

              From the Garden of Love-Light III songbook, "Ja Kichhu Jabar Jabe".

              So who knows? Maybe someday I'll...

              I would like to point out that my last posting on this group site
              also happened to be after
              a 30 mile run or so. This is a result of the tremendous inspiration
              one feels after a great
              run, perhaps especially after a long run. That article was in
              response to a posting about
              ice cream, speaking of which, today I ceremoniously included some
              Double Vanilla in my
              recovery meal. Don't worry, I only had a small serving along with
              healthier items such as a
              protein shake with ground flaxseed and oat bran and some cream of
              wheat.

              It seems that the end is near so I will bid adieu, and send my
              highest regards and
              gratitude to all of you readers and writers out there.

              Cheerful Cheers!!!

              Erik
            • rathin31
              Dear Erik, I was concerned to read that you ate such a small amount of ice cream after your run. After a big run, you should definitely eat a big amount of ice
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 5, 2005
                Dear Erik,
                I was concerned to read that you ate such a small amount of ice cream
                after your run. After a big run, you should definitely eat a big
                amount of ice cream.
                Rathin
                --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, erik_chicagocentre
                <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                > Dear Karen, Arpan, and Readers,
                >
                > I wholeheartedly agree with you that setting goals keeps you
                > inspired. I also ran a
                > marathon recently (Self-Transcendence Marathon) and shortly
                > afterwards felt that I needed
                > a new goal. The next day I found my goal: the Chicago Lakefront
                > 50k/50m race (I'm
                > opting for the 50k). This race takes place along the beautiful shore
                > of the Great Lake
                > Michigan and in sight of the impressive skyline of downtown Chicago.
                > In the past I've
                > really only raced once a year at the Self Transcendence Marathon,
                > with a few two mile
                > races thrown in here and there. So this is a totally new experience
                > for me to surge ahead
                > after the marathon with a new goal and a greater goal (in distance).
                > I can't really express
                > the immense inspiration, joy, determination, focus, dynamism and
                > self-transcendence that
                > I feel properly by these words alone. But I'm really so excited and
                > delighted to be making
                > progress in my running life.
                >
                > I'm running better now than ever and have made efforts to increase
                > my mileage volume,
                > and speed. I've done a couple of intense tempo runs and 1/2-mile
                > repeat sessions, which
                > is also an upgrade. Everything is increasing in magnitude so I've
                > kept a careful eye to
                > overtraining as Arpan advised, but I realize that it could be
                > difficult for a relatively
                > inexperienced runner such as myself to recognize the signs of
                > overtraining lost in the zeal
                > or love of the heightened running experience. I'll keep my fingers
                > crossed and send a few
                > prayers out for protection (and wisdom)!
                >
                > Today was my longest run before the race and I think I did about
                > 29-31 miles, I know
                > this is too long when training for a 50k (which is about 31 miles)
                > but I felt good and was
                > getting so much joy that I wanted to keep going. Actually what
                > happened was that I was
                > nearing the downtown area and I had the desire to do a few miles in
                > the city for flavor,
                > which increased my pre-planned mileage. Then an interesting
                > coincidence occurred as I
                > was running along the Chicago River as it emptied into Lake
                > Michigan; I ran into my next-
                > door neighbor who happened to be doing construction at a high-rise
                > apartment along the
                > river there, which was valued at 1.2 million dollars (unbelievable!).
                > We chatted for a while
                > and he told me that he recently took up running and then commented
                > that "you guys do a
                > lot of running don't you" meaning the students of Sri Chinmoy. I
                > can't help but feel that
                > we inspired him to begin running on some level.
                >
                > So I'm currently totally enveloped in the running world; constantly
                > thinking about
                > running, reading about it, learning about nutrition and various gear
                > and accessories, and
                > of course just good old fashioned running itself. I've recently
                > discovered Abichal's
                > websites: http://elight47.bravejournal.com/ (a running blog) and
                > www.multidays.com
                > (sorry, I've forgotten how to make these links). I highly recommend
                > these tremendously
                > inspiring websites to any runner and I would like to give Abichal an
                > enthusiastic e-high-
                > five (or a simple thank you) for these truly important and
                > informative sites.
                >
                > The inspiration-seed for all of this enthusiasm was planted about 7
                > months ago when I
                > learned about the World Harmony Run. I really wanted to participate
                > and join the team so
                > I immediately upped my mileage (in increments) to about 30-35
                > miles/week per the advice
                > of the U.S. Team Coordinator Atulya Berube. It was so refreshing to
                > be running again
                > regularly and I was prepping myself for the WHR. Of course my WHR
                > experience was
                > something unique and special, also challenging. It kept me in great
                > running form. Then
                > not long after my stint with the WHR I picked up the Chi Running book
                > by Danny Dreyer
                > which I found to be extremely useful for improving my running form
                > and also just as a
                > different approach and philosophy to and about running. My marathon
                > training was
                > intense in that I was focusing very intently on my form and style but
                > not so much on speed
                > and other quality types of workouts. I was content with just
                > improving form and I was
                > getting so much joy and peace from my new running style. I didn't
                > run a fast marathon at
                > all but I felt that this training was worth the effort and I
                > definitely gained something from
                > it.
                >
                > I also had another seed planted in the soil of my soul, I think it
                > was April in New York
                > when I purchased some of Abichal's Multiday Running Magazines that he
                > publishes. I find
                > the ultra-marathons and the multiday races fascinating and almost
                > incomprehensible:
                > these feats of human endurance that speak volumes on the strength and
                > glory of the spirit
                > manifesting through a finite human frame.
                >
                > Sri Chinmoy has a poem that goes:
                >
                > "Whatever is it go will go.
                > Alas, why do I weep day and night
                > in excruciating pangs?
                > Whatever is to be achieved I shall achieve,
                > Whether I want it or not,
                > Yet no joy have I." [unofficial]
                >
                > From the Garden of Love-Light III songbook, "Ja Kichhu Jabar Jabe".
                >
                > So who knows? Maybe someday I'll...
                >
                > I would like to point out that my last posting on this group site
                > also happened to be after
                > a 30 mile run or so. This is a result of the tremendous inspiration
                > one feels after a great
                > run, perhaps especially after a long run. That article was in
                > response to a posting about
                > ice cream, speaking of which, today I ceremoniously included some
                > Double Vanilla in my
                > recovery meal. Don't worry, I only had a small serving along with
                > healthier items such as a
                > protein shake with ground flaxseed and oat bran and some cream of
                > wheat.
                >
                > It seems that the end is near so I will bid adieu, and send my
                > highest regards and
                > gratitude to all of you readers and writers out there.
                >
                > Cheerful Cheers!!!
                >
                > Erik
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