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Re: MY 3100-MILE RACE-EXPERIENCE 2004 part 5

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  • tsvetantsekov
    Allways exciding to hear about the 3100 :oD See you there soon Rathin... Tsvetan ... day s ... fire ... balance. ... 1000 ... you ... since ... me ... first
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2005
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      Allways exciding to hear about the 3100 :oD
      See you there soon Rathin...
      Tsvetan
      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, rathin_31 <no_reply@y
      ...> wrote:
      > On day 15 of the race, I woke up, got dressed, waited for Sanatan to
      > pick me up, went to the race, and started running at 6 am. I cranked
      > out 107 laps, or 58.7 miles; rather thrilling after the previous
      day's
      > 80 laps. But not as good as day 13's 111 laps. I wish I could be
      > consistent. Consistently good, that is. Ashprihanal took the day's
      > honours with an unbelievable 136 laps. That's 74.6 miles. He was
      > safely in the lead at this stage. Ashprihanal has a ritual which he
      > observes when running by the Grand Central Parkway. There are two
      fire
      > hydrants along that stretch, with loose fittings on top which can
      > rotate freely. When running clockwise around the course, he reaches
      > out and turns the fittlngs anti-clockwise. When running
      > anti-clockwise, he turns them clockwise. As a sort of counter-
      balance.
      >
      > Looking back now, I can't really remember the third week of the race
      > as a distinct entity. That's what happens when all you do is run
      > around the same block. Looking at my stats, I see that I cracked
      1000
      > miles on day 19. Ashprihanal had reached 1300 the day before. When
      you
      > get into 4 figures, you know that you're finally getting somewhere.
      >
      > Did I explain already how tough mornings are? It's been so long
      since
      > my last 3100-Mile posting that probably no-one remembers. Well, let
      me
      > tell you (again) that mornings can be tough in this race. Those
      first
      > few hours pass so slowly; it takes forever to reach midday. The
      first
      > six hours seem to take half the day's effort, and half the day's
      time,
      > even though there's still another 12 hours left to go...
    • rathin_31
      Niriha, I must say in reply to your question, that getting up in the morning during the 3100 mile race is not all that bad! In fact, I get into such a routine
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2005
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        Niriha, I must say in reply to your question, that getting up in the
        morning during the 3100 mile race is not all that bad! In fact, I get
        into such a routine that in some ways it's easier to get up than it is
        when I'm not doing the race. What is hard, though, is trying to
        meditate longer than five minutes without falling asleep. Perhaps I'm
        looking back with rose-coloured glasses; the race starts again in just
        over a week, and I'll get the chance to rediscover, once again, just
        what it's really like!

        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, niriha7
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > Rathin, What about waking up in the morning? Doesn't your body feel
        > like lead? Do you have to force yourself out of bed each morning?
        >
        > By the way, you were certainly consistent in your smiling. That
        > amazed me. Niriha
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, rathin_31
        > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > > On day 15 of the race, I woke up, got dressed, waited for Sanatan to
        > > pick me up, went to the race, and started running at 6 am. I cranked
        > > out 107 laps, or 58.7 miles; rather thrilling after the previous
        > day's
        > > 80 laps. But not as good as day 13's 111 laps. I wish I could be
        > > consistent. Consistently good, that is. Ashprihanal took the day's
        > > honours with an unbelievable 136 laps. That's 74.6 miles. He was
        > > safely in the lead at this stage. Ashprihanal has a ritual which he
        > > observes when running by the Grand Central Parkway. There are two
        > fire
        > > hydrants along that stretch, with loose fittings on top which can
        > > rotate freely. When running clockwise around the course, he reaches
        > > out and turns the fittlngs anti-clockwise. When running
        > > anti-clockwise, he turns them clockwise. As a sort of counter-
        > balance.
        > >
        > > Looking back now, I can't really remember the third week of the race
        > > as a distinct entity. That's what happens when all you do is run
        > > around the same block. Looking at my stats, I see that I cracked
        > 1000
        > > miles on day 19. Ashprihanal had reached 1300 the day before. When
        > you
        > > get into 4 figures, you know that you're finally getting somewhere.
        > >
        > > Did I explain already how tough mornings are? It's been so long
        > since
        > > my last 3100-Mile posting that probably no-one remembers. Well, let
        > me
        > > tell you (again) that mornings can be tough in this race. Those
        > first
        > > few hours pass so slowly; it takes forever to reach midday. The
        > first
        > > six hours seem to take half the day's effort, and half the day's
        > time,
        > > even though there's still another 12 hours left to go...
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