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Running Inspiration

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  • maleenendra
    I just went for a brisk late afternoon jog and I feel great! It s been a while since I felt such inspiration from my environment when I ran that I d almost
    Message 1 of 5 , May 25, 2005
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      I just went for a brisk late afternoon jog and I feel great! It's been
      a while since I felt such inspiration from my environment when I ran
      that I'd almost forgot what it was like.

      There's nothing like cleaning out the cobwebs after a stifling day in
      the office. In the next week, I'll buckle down and begin marathon
      training - which I am really looking forward to.

      So....when do you like to run - early morning or early evening or
      night or during the day?
      Does this change depending on the season?
    • tsvetantsekov
      Hi Maleenendra, I like to run early in the morning but also late in the morning to about noon. The mornings, I feel they have a feeling of newness and
      Message 2 of 5 , May 25, 2005
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        Hi Maleenendra,
        I like to run early in the morning but also late in the morning to
        about noon. The mornings, I feel they have a feeling of newness and
        freshness and that's why I get much more inspiration from running at
        this time of the day.
        In the hot summer days I like to go out running in the evening at
        sunset when deep silence descends.
        Well that's what I can say about myself. I think also that running and
        nature are inseparable, we can get so much more inspiration when
        running in nice surroundings.

        Tsvetan

        --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, maleenendra
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > I just went for a brisk late afternoon jog and I feel great! It's
        been
        > a while since I felt such inspiration from my environment when I ran
        > that I'd almost forgot what it was like.
        >
        > There's nothing like cleaning out the cobwebs after a stifling day
        in
        > the office. In the next week, I'll buckle down and begin marathon
        > training - which I am really looking forward to.
        >
        > So....when do you like to run - early morning or early evening or
        > night or during the day?
        > Does this change depending on the season?
      • rathin_31
        In reply to the question when do you like to run , I would like to say that I, too, like to run in the morning. Then, you can go to work, come home, and in
        Message 3 of 5 , May 26, 2005
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          In reply to the question "when do you like to run", I would like to
          say that I, too, like to run in the morning. Then, you can go to work,
          come home, and in the evening you don't have to go running, because
          you've already been! Having said that, I don't always, or even
          usually, run in the morning. But, I did the last two days, and it was
          great. Out amongst the gumtrees and the birdies and the crisp, cool
          air...does it get any better than that?
          Rathin

          --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, tsvetantsekov
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > Hi Maleenendra,
          > I like to run early in the morning but also late in the morning to
          > about noon. The mornings, I feel they have a feeling of newness and
          > freshness and that's why I get much more inspiration from running at
          > this time of the day.
          > In the hot summer days I like to go out running in the evening at
          > sunset when deep silence descends.
          > Well that's what I can say about myself. I think also that running and
          > nature are inseparable, we can get so much more inspiration when
          > running in nice surroundings.
          >
          > Tsvetan
          >
          > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, maleenendra
          > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > > I just went for a brisk late afternoon jog and I feel great! It's
          > been
          > > a while since I felt such inspiration from my environment when I ran
          > > that I'd almost forgot what it was like.
          > >
          > > There's nothing like cleaning out the cobwebs after a stifling day
          > in
          > > the office. In the next week, I'll buckle down and begin marathon
          > > training - which I am really looking forward to.
          > >
          > > So....when do you like to run - early morning or early evening or
          > > night or during the day?
          > > Does this change depending on the season?
        • arpan_deangelo
          We are having a very cold winter here in New York and quite a bit of snow and icy conditions which have made running outdoors a challenge. But even in
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 29, 2014
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            We are having a very cold winter here in New York and quite a bit of snow and icy conditions which have made running outdoors a challenge. But even in conditions like this many decades ago, from the winter of 1978 through ’83, Guru would train quite seriously for marathons. If one wants to try and follow in his footsteps either for marathon training or just to stay in basic shape and running form, then I wish to offer some ideas which have been working for me this winter as I try to get into shape for the upcoming ‘Chico Anniversary’ Marathon.

             

            The first weekend of every March we celebrate the Anniversary of Guru’s first marathon race which was on March 3, 1979 in Chico, California. It was called the ‘Bidwell  Classic’, and he ran it in 4 hours, 31 min. 34 seconds. He ran another marathon that month, on March 25 in the cold weather of Toledo, Ohio. He ran his personal best there with a 3:55:07 time, incredible for being only three weeks after his very first marathon.

            He then ran two more marathons in May of that year, two more in October and one more in December! Nothing could stop our brave Guru when he took on a project involving self-transcendence.

             

            He did all of these races along with the necessary training while still maintaining his busy schedule of music, meditation, tennis, and all the traveling and other responsibilities it took to have so many Centres and disciples around the world. Most of us, all much younger then, were so energized by this new discipline of Guru’s that we all took our own training and racing more seriously. Now that much time has passed since then we can still find ways to stay fit and even enjoy racing.

             

            Even though Guru is not in the physical body, his efforts and achievements, along with his inner guidance, can still greatly help those of us who still love to race as well as those who may be newer to the sport of the footrace, especially the marathon and beyond. If we can appreciate the tremendous focus and discipline that our own Guru had to get in shape and race marathons at any time of the year and in all kinds of weather, then we can also give ourselves and him joy in trying to do the same.

             

            So the ideas I said I would offer to give some inspiration to those who wish to start or continue training start with what I just described above: Guru’s tremendous efforts and achievements in marathon training and racing. As you go out every day to train, whether it is an easy or short run or a longer, harder run, just imagine that Guru is right there with you training and smiling.


            I also  found that morning running, especially in the winter, makes it easier to get the training in even though it may be quite cold. Later in the day it gets dark and cold much earlier, so finding extra time in the morning pays off as you can get it over with and not worry about it later. In the warmer months you have more daylight and weather conducive to evening or even night running.

             

            If you are not training seriously for an early marathon, like the Chico Anniversary on March 1 this year, then the most important thing is just regularity, and not so much mileage yet. If you get into the habit of running every day, or at least 5 or 6 days per week if you cannot handle 7 days, then even if it is just low mileage like 2 or 3 or 4 miles, that will have a cumulative effect on the rest of your year’s training. Not only will it be easier to pick up the mileage as the weather gets warmer but your regular habit of running everyday, even if it is low mileage with some walking, will give you the foundation and inspiration to run more seriously and perhaps get into good shape for the Rockland Marathon in August.

             

            But it all starts now, so do not delay much longer, even if August seems so far off. Here are some inspiring poems by Guru to get you started:

             

            “The spiritual life is a marathon,

            An inner marathon which never ends.

            The Supreme is begging

            All His seeker-children

            To be excellent runners-

            To run speedily, like deer-

            In this eternal inner journey.”

             

            “Just start your inner race

            Without waiting to see

            Who else is ready to run with you.

            When others see you have reached your goal,

            They will also be inspired to run.”

             

            Finally, you may feel you need a coach or someone to give you advice on specific training ideas and techniques. My training guide called, ‘Seven Steps To A Successful Marathon’ can be found online on the SCMT website. I am sure there are many good books and other experienced runners who can assist you with their experiences as well.

            But it is you who have to make the decision that you really want to train and enjoy the benefits that go along with a serious commitment to getting in racing shape, jsut as Guru did.

             

            Here is one more poem by Sri Chinmoy that may help in the quest for a good coach:

             

            “Who is my coach?

            He who inspires me

               Before I run.

             

            Who is my coach?

            He who aspires in and through me

                During my run.

             

            Who is my coach?

            He who corrects and perfects me

                For a better future run.”


            One more thing which helps me to get out and train, even when I am tired or in the snow or the rain, is a quote by Emil Zatopek which Guru set to music over 30 years ago:


            "If I can stick to the training for many long years, then will-power is no longer a problem. It's raining, that doesn't matter. I'm tired, that's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

            This is most effective when you can learn the song and sing it to the rhythm of your cold, wet or tired run, or even on a good day.


            Happy Training,

            Arpan



             

             

             

             

          • bigalita
            Arpan, thanks a lot, that s a great inspirational message - even for those who can t run any more for the moment and just have to walk. Do you have the music
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 30, 2014
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              Arpan, thanks a lot, that's a great inspirational message - even for those who can't run any more for the moment and just have to walk.  Do you have the music to Emil Zatopek's quote by any chance? We don't have  rain or snow challenges here in sunny California, but having to walk instead of run needs some  extra willpower too. Walking, for me, is not even half as much fun as running used to be. OK, here I go - out the door!!
              Bigalita
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