Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The Creative Process (was Spiritual Uniqueness)

Expand Messages
  • srichinmoyinspiration
    Dear Sharani, I try to keep a balance so that there are some soulful postings, some that are more intellectual, and some that are just plain wacky. I ve
    Message 1 of 59 , Feb 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Sharani,

      I try to keep a balance so that there are some "soulful" postings,
      some that are more intellectual, and some that are just plain wacky.
      I've posted very few of my poems, but they occasionally "peek out
      between the poppy fields." :-) In message #9811 you can find one
      called "Astronomers (The Other Self)," or if that one's not
      childlike enough you can try "Cats Of Queen Beruthiel" (message
      #7975). I have no fire, no fireplace, and no parlor as such, but I
      do sometimes light the oven in the dead of winter to keep from
      freezing while I'm looking after the Inspiration group. Thanks for
      asking! and thanks for your own creative contributions.

      Assistant Moderator


      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sharani_sharani
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear A.M.,
      >
      > This is the first poem by you I've read here on our group. Have I
      > just missed others from when I wasn't actively reading and posting?
      > Why this is quite delightful! I hope you share even more. Your
      > postings on our current threads, especially creativity, have been so
      > thought-provoking. When I first joined this group last summer, I
      > said that I imagined it was the modern-day equivalent to the
      > salon/parlor discussion groups of intellectuals that used to gather
      > in sponsors' homes. Was I not right? Of course ours is a gathering
      > of like-minded spirituals, not just intellectuals. A.M. is there a
      > fire in the fireplace in your parlor when you look after our
      > offerings?
      >
      > Sharani
      >
      >
      > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com,
      > srichinmoyinspiration <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Dear Sumangali,
      > >
      > > Thanks for your latest thoughts. I agree with Snehashila and
      > others.
      > > It's wonderful to have our own living Emily Dickinson in our midst,
      > > and be a part of her growing pains as an artist and a spiritual
      > > seeker. Every now and then someone might say "What's she on about?"
      > > But I think we're mostly happy to be a part of it all. If no book
      > is
      > > forthcoming, then at least there should be a CD with all the
      > dolphin
      > > sounds. :-)
      > >
      > > I'm as gobsmacked as anybody if I happen to come up with an insight
      > > that helps somebody else - and grateful, because that's a way out
      > of
      > > selfishness for me. Beverly's story (#10472) from the Buddhist
      > > tradition says it all: If you're hungry, feed your neighbor! If you
      > > feel unloved, give more love to others. What Bithika wrote in
      > #10474
      > > is also part of the equation:
      > >
      > > "...to look at every part of yourself with an even eye, to draw the
      > > light into the darkness and hold it there - brings such deep
      > > satisfaction, faith, joy and peace to those with the courage and
      > > fortitude to stick it out."
      > >
      > > How much trust can we give to this higher light to enter into our
      > > hearts so deeply that no corner of our being remains aloof? For if
      > I
      > > cannot feel love, it is not because love is not there, but because
      > > something inside me has turned away from it.
      > >
      > > Insight is good as far as it goes, but unless that light works its
      > > way deep into our hearts, insight alone may not have the power to
      > > change our nature.
      > >
      > > Anyway, getting back to writing... I especially like those of your
      > > posts which are brimming with people, places and things, described
      > > in such fine poetic detail. It was your message #6024 that first
      > > really caught my attention.
      > >
      > > Writers are often tempted to spend a great deal of time writing
      > > about their own inner space. That can be good and bad. My personal
      > > experience is that this can start to get claustrophobic. Each human
      > > being has their inner space that they wake up to each morning, and
      > I
      > > think many people want to get beyond that space. Readers want to
      > > feel they are romping through the sunshine, strolling through a
      > > gentle rain by the seaside, circumnavigating a crowded market
      > filled
      > > with strange colours and smells, or conversing with unusual
      > > characters they would probably never meet in real life.
      > >
      > > If I choose to write about people, places and things, that doesn't
      > > mean I'm no longer writing about myself. It just means I'm
      > > expressing myself through one level of reflection (if this makes
      > any
      > > sense). The vision that is directed outward still carries the
      > > essence of what is within.
      > >
      > > Only a fraction of the world's great artworks are self-portraits,
      > > but in the way that artists paint faces, shapes and forms, they are
      > > expressing their individuality and deep feelings about life. That
      > is
      > > how I see it.
      > >
      > > If I can write about a person, a rainbow, an ocean or tree with
      > > enough love, then the reader will feel that love. And the richness
      > > of language you spoke of is doubled or trebled when one writes
      > > dialogue for characters who have their distinct histories,
      > > personalities and manners of speech.
      > >
      > > I don't know if I love words as much as you do. Sometimes I think
      > > they are "damned clunky things." Musical notes and dabs of paint
      > are
      > > less ornery. But words are sometimes good tools.
      > >
      > > I too enjoy the way changing a single word can alter the whole
      > > character of a passage, and truly "now is the winter of our
      > > discombobulation." :-)
      > >
      > > Although I love seeing what graphic designers can do with fonts,
      > > when writing I want no visual distractions, so I opt for a simple
      > > text processor with as few bells and whistles as possible. I must
      > > stick up for the much-maligned "clumsy and sterile" Courier font -
      > > one of my favourites! It's a humble workhorse, and the "juice" (or
      > > "rasa") is in the words, not in the font. Hey, you can set the
      > > bloody grocery list in Old English Deluxe Kingsfoil and it will
      > look
      > > like something from King James. But in plain Courier, the words
      > > stand or fall on their own merit.
      > >
      > > I've experimented a lot with words, sometimes striving for exotic
      > > effects, but I've come to appreciate simplicity. I don't know if I
      > > would have arrived at simplicity on my own, so that is one more
      > > thing for which I am grateful to Sri Chinmoy. I dedicate this poem
      > > to him:
      > >
      > >
      > > The Canvas Painter
      > >
      > > I can spend a long time
      > > with the color blue
      > > and some white, textured white
      > > I can watch the swans
      > > long after others have gone home
      > > to their dinners
      > > I can look for the light
      > > long after the light has gone
      > > I can speak with the stars
      > > but are they really listening?
      > > or is what I hear
      > > just the murmur of birds
      > > stirring in their sleep
      > > the hour before dawn?
      > >
      > > * * *
      > >
      > > Thank you, thank you, Sri Chinmoy...
      > > for teaching this often complicated person
      > > the beauty of simplicity -
      > > in a poem, and in a life.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sumangali_m
      > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Dear Assistant Moderator
      > > >
      > > > Though message #10448 was not addressed to me, it grabbed me by
      > the
      > > > collar and said, "listen!" Sometimes that happens when reading
      > > > something at the right time, doesn't it?
      > > >
      > > > In so many ways you answered my longing for a more authentic way
      > > > ahead in my own creativity, though you perhaps did this
      > > > inadvertently. I am so grateful for the wisdom in all three of
      > your
      > > > messages, especially this third one: I simply don't have words
      > to
      > > > tell you how it has inspired me. Sometimes I think the Supreme
      > will
      > > > inspire someone inwardly to offer something, thus using that
      > person
      > > > as a divine instrument, but the person offering may not
      > necessarily
      > > > be aware of the profound impact on one receiving. I am sorry
      > that as
      > > > such a receiver I am unable to adequately express my gratitude.
      > > >
      > > > In your last paragraph you said, "Sometimes, in spite of being
      > loved,
      > > > a person doesn't *feel* loved. So they feel starved for love,
      > even
      > > > though there is much love around them." I think the metaphorical
      > > > collar was ripped from the yoke at this point :-)
      > > >
      > > > Personally, it's only through starting to accept God's
      > unconditional
      > > > love that I am able to really feel love for others. Accepting
      > the
      > > > love of others is also made easier through becoming aware of
      > God's
      > > > love, but I think it's surprisingly one of the most difficult
      > things.
      > > > I'm surprised that receiving can be more difficult than giving.
      > I'm
      > > > also surprised that someone such as myself, who feels just about
      > > > everything very deeply, finds it so hard to really *feel* love,
      > > > encouragement and praise from others. That's why I found your
      > message
      > > > so illumining and encouraging; generally, spiritually, and
      > regarding
      > > > creativity. It's not something I usually think about, but maybe
      > it's
      > > > important to do so.
      > > >
      > > > I also enjoyed the links very much, especially the article by
      > the
      > > > female conductor – inlaid with so many gems of inspiration.
      > > >
      > > > As for baby dolphins: 100% me! It's time to learn how to
      > use "this
      > > > sonar thing." Having had the luxury of this space to reel off
      > reams
      > > > of writing for several months, I'm left with a question: "Why do
      > I
      > > > write?" I tried to stand back from it all to find an answer.
      > Some of
      > > > it I can stand back from, but some of it is so much a part of me
      > that
      > > > I cannot. That is an answer in itself.
      > > >
      > > > I sometimes write just to play, or just to communicate. I
      > suppose
      > > > this just comes from a mental source that I can access any time,
      > like
      > > > now. I can easily stand back from such creations; in fact I
      > would
      > > > sometimes choose to walk away altogether. :-)
      > > >
      > > > I also write because now it seems I cannot "not write." This
      > comes
      > > > from a more sincere, pure source. I don't know where it is -
      > deep
      > > > inside myself, or somewhere beyond? Words from there choose me
      > while
      > > > I'm waiting for them, or while I'm working, or cleaning the
      > floor, or
      > > > when I ought to be sleeping. They are like confident children I
      > > > barely know, tugging unabashed at my sleeve. They will not be
      > > > refused. I cannot change them, and would not want to: children
      > have
      > > > their own perfection and so do such words. They take my breath
      > and my
      > > > thoughts, as when coming suddenly upon a bright view, and I rush
      > to
      > > > capture them on any scrap I can lay hands to. No criticism will
      > > > offend me where these words are concerned; praise is irrelevant –
      >
      > > > they are not born of my own diligence; they bear their own
      > perfect
      > > > satisfaction. You are right: "No outer attention can ever equal
      > the
      > > > soul's sweetness-satisfaction-smile."
      > > >
      > > > I have thought more on the discussion I was having with
      > Pavitrata
      > > > about the role of the mind in the creative process. Writings I
      > > > receive from a more pure and inspiring source are not usually
      > fully
      > > > formed; they need some mental jugglery to bring them from
      > the "medium
      > > > of light to the medium of words" as you put it. I realise now
      > that
      > > > this is actually a fine way to work. It seems like a jigsaw
      > puzzle:
      > > > inspiration gives me pieces that will only fit together in one
      > way; I
      > > > have to work it out mentally, and make pieces to fill in gaps.
      > It's
      > > > often only a while after the puzzle is finished that I see some
      > of
      > > > the reasons why certain pieces go in certain places, though I
      > may
      > > > have only noticed one reason at the time I put them there.
      > Perhaps
      > > > the poem is playing with me, and not vice versa! I agree
      > > > wholeheartedly with your comment: "In short, `first thought,
      > best
      > > > thought' - BUT `revise, revise, revise!'" I think I would
      > benefit
      > > > from following this advice a little more closely.
      > > >
      > > > I love words. I love to be immersed in them. They are even more
      > > > beautiful when written down than when spoken. I love the way
      > they
      > > > sound and how they look on a page. I love the subtle differences
      > in
      > > > their meaning, and the way the sound of them adds to that. I
      > love the
      > > > way they change depending on where they are placed amongst other
      > > > words, just as a colour is affected by its context. I love their
      > > > power and their sensitivity, and the way they reflect the very
      > light
      > > > of a writer's heart and soul.
      > > >
      > > > I'm now sure I would still write even if I didn't offer the
      > results
      > > > to others. I write to amuse myself, to explain things to myself,
      > to
      > > > define myself, and increasingly to worship the Supreme. I do
      > also
      > > > write to amuse others, to offer to others, and to reach out to
      > > > others.
      > > >
      > > > I am now clearer about my own motivations for seeking praise.
      > Since
      > > > absorbing your three messages I have the courage to face
      > that "demon
      > > > of External Validation" head on, and it's not so scary. Now I
      > hope to
      > > > recognise it more easily, accepting it but asking it to sit
      > quietly
      > > > so as not to numb or muddy creativity. Wish me luck; I'm
      > certainly a
      > > > member of the "intense, introspective bunch." I'm probably on
      > the
      > > > committee in fact. :-)
      > > >
      > > > So now, I wonder how I use this sonar thing? I'm not about to
      > stop
      > > > writing chitchat or humorous things just because they come from
      > a
      > > > shallow source. Such writing is not exactly necessary, but if
      > it's
      > > > harmless fun, it's valuable. Perhaps the key is being sincere
      > about
      > > > the reason for writing, and then deciding whether it's a worthy
      > cause
      > > > at the time, rather than just being swept along. It's just a
      > matter
      > > > of control perhaps – as with sonar things, so with inspiration
      > to
      > > > write.
      > > >
      > > > I feel that recognising and valuing the creativity that comes
      > from a
      > > > higher source is crucial for me now, including nurturing its
      > gifts,
      > > > and offering them with the humility they deserve. That type of
      > > > writing is not some frivolous activity that I can make do
      > without;
      > > > it's a part of my very fabric now, and of my spiritual life.
      > > >
      > > > Such sincere and pure creation is rare for me thus far, but
      > stays
      > > > with me, without losing its freshness, expanding with its own
      > light
      > > > and energy. I am convinced beyond all doubt that it has come
      > from
      > > > trying to meditate and lead a spiritual life. Having said that,
      > it
      > > > does not belong to me, just as meditation comes from Grace and
      > cannot
      > > > be earned.
      > > >
      > > > For finding the expression of my creativity, I am all gratitude
      > to
      > > > Sri Chinmoy. I have found in him not only my spiritual guide,
      > but
      > > > also one who can access the source of pure creativity, and
      > express it
      > > > freely in so many ways. His creative freshness inspires me
      > daily.
      > > >
      > > > I am also very grateful to you, AM, for encouraging me to write –
      >
      > > > right from my very first message on this site, to some of the
      > earlier
      > > > paragraphs in this very thread. I am very grateful to everyone
      > here
      > > > for inspiring me daily. I've been enjoying Purnakama and
      > Sharani's
      > > > discussion on writing poetry. Bithika's final paragraph in
      > message
      > > > #10474 is thought provoking, and gratitude provoking: "Winters
      > are
      > > > the test of the soul's strength, from which new life springs
      > forth
      > > > afresh." It's been a long and bitterly cold winter for me
      > creatively.
      > > > (Is that what Douglas Adams called "The Long, Dark Tea-time of
      > the
      > > > Soul?")
      > > >
      > > > I am grateful for the inner springtime, and for every fragile
      > bud
      > > > that unfurls now as I come out of hibernation. Whatever
      > blossoms, or
      > > > does not blossom in the future, I hope to remember the wisdom in
      > the
      > > > following words from your message "...long before we ever
      > thought to
      > > > create anything, God loved and nurtured our soul. And even if we
      > > > never create another thing, God will continue to love us."
      > > >
      > > > Sumangali
      > > > :oD
      > > >
      > > > P.S. So much for being "a little more restrained from now on" as
      > I
      > > > decided in my last message. This discussion is at the crux of a
      > > > powerful evaluation taking place in my world at the moment. In
      > such
      > > > cases I find this kind of mental analysis an invaluable support
      > to my
      > > > inner resolutions with the Supreme.
      > > >
      > > > Anyway, perhaps an attempt to control the sonar thing affects
      > quality
      > > > and but not necessarily quantity. If anything it seems the
      > quantity
      > > > is increasing. I'll never get the ironing done ;-)
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com,
      > srichinmoyinspiration
      > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I hope Shane will forgive me for replying to myself. :-)
      > > > >
      > > > > I'd just like to add something based on a "not for posting"
      > message
      > > > > I got. I don't think the "outer attention vs. inner
      > appreciation"
      > > > > dichotomy has to be worked out completely before one can write
      > and
      > > > > share with others. As human beings, we all need some outer
      > > > > attention, as well as some inner appreciation. As spiritual
      > seekers,
      > > > > we are trying to learn to value the inner appreciation a little
      > > > > more. Why?
      > > > >
      > > > > One reason to value the inner appreciation - the appreciation
      > that
      > > > > comes from our own soul, or from God - is that this inner
      > > > > appreciation is never false. Also, it always tries to help us
      > do the
      > > > > right thing in our lives, and this inner appreciation makes us
      > feel
      > > > > truly loved.
      > > > >
      > > > > By contrast, the outer attention sometimes encourages us to do
      > the
      > > > > popular thing, which is not always the right thing. The outer
      > > > > attention may feed our ego, yet no matter how much outer
      > attention
      > > > > we get, we always crave more. Somehow, the outer attention
      > does not
      > > > > lead to deep and abiding satisfaction. It does not make us feel
      > > > > truly loved. It satisfies us only for a few moments, but then
      > we
      > > > > want more. We begin to think that we will only be loved if we
      > > > > produce some tangible result for the world to admire.* Then it
      > > > > becomes like a business transaction: we create something, and
      > in
      > > > > return people have to love us. But long before we ever thought
      > to
      > > > > create anything, God loved and nurtured our soul. And even if
      > we
      > > > > never create another thing, God will continue to love us.
      > > > >
      > > > > If we are gradually learning to value the inner appreciation
      > more,
      > > > > this doesn't mean we have committed a terrible crime if on
      > some days
      > > > > we need the outer attention. There is no need to run away and
      > hide
      > > > > if we are "caught" craving love and attention from our
      > friends. Some
      > > > > days are like that. We are still learning. Some days we need
      > to be
      > > > > praised to the skies! It makes us feel that we are not alone
      > in our
      > > > > intense inner struggles, and it helps us feel connected with
      > others
      > > > > who may be going through the same thing.
      > > > >
      > > > > So it would be a great pity if someone thought: "Oh! Here I'm
      > > > > supposed to be a spiritual seeker, but I've been caught
      > craving love
      > > > > and attention. Now I have to run away and hide, and I can
      > never show
      > > > > my face again until I'm ready to do completely without."
      > > > >
      > > > > I think that approach would be wrong. I like the idea of
      > accepting
      > > > > that as a human being, I might sometimes need people to love
      > me for
      > > > > the good things I can do, even as I'm trying to learn to value
      > the
      > > > > inner appreciation more.
      > > > >
      > > > > Creative artists often have an inner world that is very
      > intense,
      > > > > filled with highs and lows. Sometimes they can emerge from a
      > period
      > > > > of introspection with a strong need for attention - kind of
      > like a
      > > > > bear emerging from hibernation with an intense appetite. :-)
      > > > >
      > > > > Creative artists sometimes have trouble eking out a "stable
      > middle"
      > > > > that they can rely on. I enjoyed what Sharani said in #10477
      > about
      > > > > the poetic muse being like strong wine. Poets do sometimes feel
      > > > > intoxicated when they write - or have freshly written - and may
      > > > > become low when the muse leaves them, even for a short coffee
      > break!
      > > > >
      > > > > When light and inspiration are descending from above, the ego
      > may
      > > > > try to get hold of this, and may react in all kinds of
      > (unhelpful)
      > > > > ways. I hope that through experience, daily living, and God's
      > Grace,
      > > > > we can all conquer these kinds of problems. In the meantime, I
      > hope
      > > > > we can all learn to show kindness to one another, and also to
      > truly
      > > > > *feel* kindness when it is shown to us.
      > > > >
      > > > > This latter point, about learning to feel deeply, is something
      > I
      > > > > have been exploring in my own writings. Sometimes, in spite of
      > being
      > > > > loved, a person doesn't *feel* loved. So they feel starved for
      > love,
      > > > > even though there is much love around them.
      > > > >
      > > > > Assistant Moderator
      > > > >
      > > > > *In the states there was a TV show called Northern Exposure,
      > set
      > > > > in the somewhat mythical locale of Cicely, Alaska. This show
      > often
      > > > > incorporated elements of magical realism. An episode
      > called "Grand
      > > > > Prix" is described in one episode guide as follows:
      > > > >
      > > > > "As wheelchair athletes converge on Cicely for a road race
      > sponsored
      > > > > by Team Minnifield, the Green Man of low self-esteem pays
      > another
      > > > > visit to shaman Ed, who tries to cure one competitor's ailment-
      > - and
      > > > > also battle her demon of External Validation."
      > > > >
      > > > > For a tangentially-related article about women in the field of
      > > > > conducting classical music, you can visit:
      > > > >
      > > > > http://www.imagejournal.org/back/017/taylor_essay.asp
      > > > >
      > > > > The article happens to mention the Northern Exposure episode in
      > > > > question, and includes some spiritual insights about
      > conducting.
      > > > >
      > > > > And for a brief, somewhat philosophical introduction to the
      > whole
      > > > > Northern Exposure concept, you can try
      > > > >
      > > > > http://www.mail-archive.com/moq_discuss@m.../msg01497.html
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com,
      > > > srichinmoyinspiration
      > > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Dear Sumangali, my suggestions were general and not meant to
      > > > > > restrain you from posting your latest creations while the
      > virtual
      > > > > > ink is still wet. Please feel free. :-) Heck, in writing
      > classes
      > > > > > they practically *force* people to churn out stuff quickly.
      > And
      > > > for
      > > > > > creative artists, play time is an important part of
      > learning. I'm
      > > > > > reminded of a film I once saw about baby dolphins when they
      > first
      > > > > > discover they have this sonar thing. They test it out
      > playfully,
      > > > and
      > > > > > eventually learn to use it.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Right now, after a period of introspection, you might be
      > in "Gee
      > > > > > whiz, I'm a writer!" mode. That's perfectly fine. Wanting to
      > feel
      > > > > > appreciated is not something shameful. It's very natural,
      > but it
      > > > can
      > > > > > get out of hand - especially for artists, who tend to be an
      > > > intense,
      > > > > > introspective bunch. How to manage the "inner attention
      > junkie"
      > > > can
      > > > > > be a lifelong study!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Different strategies might work for different folks. I'm
      > only an
      > > > > > amateur writer, but sometimes I like to keep the "inner
      > attention
      > > > > > junkie" hungry, so I will work harder at revising my work.
      > > > Recently
      > > > > > I worked for about six months on one piece, and only now am I
      > > > > > beginning to think of showing it. But that's just me...
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Sometimes I think there's a kind of idealized "inner critic"
      > who
      > > > > > doesn't flatter you excessively, and doesn't cut you to
      > shreds;
      > > > but
      > > > > > lets you know when you did right and when you did wrong.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I also think there's a very special experience a writer can
      > have,
      > > > > > which is to receive a gift of words and images from a higher
      > > > source
      > > > > > - words and images which then lead back to that source.
      > > > Afterwards,
      > > > > > in the depths of one's heart one can feel the soul-child
      > smiling
      > > > and
      > > > > > saying: "Yes, you listened and wrote it all down perfectly.
      > You
      > > > > > accepted my gift, nurtured and cared for it, and now I am
      > giving
      > > > you
      > > > > > my brightest smile, which is filled with divine love, divine
      > > > pride,
      > > > > > divine affection."
      > > > > >
      > > > > > No outer attention can ever equal the soul's sweetness-
      > > > satisfaction-
      > > > > > smile.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Assistant Moderator
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, sumangali_m
      > > > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Some may ask whether all this stuff about creativity
      > warrants
      > > > such an
      > > > > > > in-depth discussion. From my point of view it definitely
      > does.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I've always seen creativity as a fundamental part of my
      > nature;
      > > > even
      > > > > > > feeling a need for it as part of my spiritual life. I
      > spent
      > > > years in
      > > > > > > search of an outlet for it, and had finally given up. To
      > > > suddenly
      > > > > > > discover that writing is the best medium for me to express
      > > > myself
      > > > > > > brings a deep sense of relief and satisfaction, but also
      > some
      > > > > > > challenges. This discussion is therefore extremely
      > valuable to
      > > > me.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I'm so glad Pavitrata disagreed with my idea that "I ought
      > to
      > > > just
      > > > > > > trust that creativity knows how to write" (message
      > #10447). I
      > > > > > > disagreed with it too after I'd sent it, but he has saved
      > me
      > > > the job
      > > > > > > of correcting myself. I disagree with one point he made:
      > that
      > > > > > > intuition can be wrong; but I definitely agree with the
      > idea
      > > > > > > that "what one may have thought of as coming from one's
      > > > intuition
      > > > > > > didn't come from there at all." That's one of many areas
      > in
      > > > which the
      > > > > > > discriminating mind can help.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I am extremely grateful to the Assistant Moderator for
      > > > contributing
      > > > > > > such wisdom to the discussion, specifically about writing.
      > I
      > > > can
      > > > > > > definitely relate to the truth in this message, and am
      > very
      > > > inspired
      > > > > > > by it, though some of it is uncomfortable.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Personally, with all these years of pent up creativity and
      > > > > > > communication all jostling to come out at once, I feel
      > like I
      > > > just
      > > > > > > don't have the inner maturity to keep up with my
      > inspiration a
      > > > lot of
      > > > > > > the time. To add to the challenge, it seems the
      > inspiration
      > > > comes
      > > > > > > from so many different sources. I have not yet developed
      > enough
      > > > > > > discernment to work out what those sources are, let alone
      > > > determine
      > > > > > > how reliable they are. That's quite strange sometimes.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I don't think I could ever be grateful enough for the
      > > > opportunity of
      > > > > > > writing on this site. Although I like to I think I would
      > write
      > > > even
      > > > > > > if nobody ever read my writing, I don't know if that's
      > true. I
      > > > do
      > > > > > > know that I learn a lot through offering what I have here.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Here I have to face my own mistakes, which brings powerful
      > > > motivation
      > > > > > > not to repeat them. Putting myself in this situation helps
      > me
      > > > > > > discover the authenticity and integrity of whatever I am
      > > > offering,
      > > > > > > which is a good habit to develop.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I have said many times how much I value the encouragement
      > I
      > > > receive
      > > > > > > here. Personally, I'm not used to being good at something,
      > so
      > > > I'm not
      > > > > > > used to handling praise. Sadly it does sometimes go to my
      > head,
      > > > and
      > > > > > > (to my shame) I can definitely relate to the Assistant
      > > > Moderator's
      > > > > > > idea of the "inner attention junkie."
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > However, I don't always value praise just for shallow
      > > > gratification -
      > > > > > > to me encouragement is one of the biggest sources of
      > > > inspiration.
      > > > > > > Though opinions are subjective, if a spiritually inclined
      > > > person is
      > > > > > > inspired by my creativity, I see it as a further
      > indication
      > > > that its
      > > > > > > source is perhaps authentic.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I must admit that I'm often in too much of a rush to post
      > my
      > > > writing.
      > > > > > > This comes partly from my "inner attention junkie," partly
      > from
      > > > a
      > > > > > > sincere and child-like urge to offer, and partly because I
      > just
      > > > want
      > > > > > > to get on to the next adventure. The AM's message has
      > inspired
      > > > me to
      > > > > > > try and be a little more restrained from now on. I hope
      > that
      > > > the
      > > > > > > quality of my postings will increase and the quantity will
      > > > decrease
      > > > > > > as a result. I sometimes see writing as a way of defining
      > > > myself, but
      > > > > > > that definition seems to change daily, so I might just get
      > lost
      > > > in
      > > > > > > the labyrinth of my own self-analysis and you'll never
      > hear
      > > > from me
      > > > > > > again. Let's see. ;-)
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Sumangali
      > > > > > > :oD
    • sharani_sharani
      Sumangali s comments on your albums have brought to light your regular updates of them. What a total treat! Now we know to keep going back in for what is new,
      Message 59 of 59 , Mar 12, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Sumangali's comments on your albums have brought to light your
        regular updates of them. What a total treat! Now we know to keep
        going back in for what is new, although the flip-side of the coin is
        that I already see some missing that I liked a lot.

        I like so many but wanted to especially mention, Mont Saint Michel 7,
        Et-la-mer, La salle d'organe, St. Malo 6, Sunset at the London Eye
        (this one very much!), and Ozymandias, especially for the fence
        around the statue and the design on the sidewalk around it.

        Don't you feel that it is Divine *Providence* that your name starts
        with the letter P?

        Pavitrata
        Photographer
        Pictures
        Perfect
        Pleasing
        Powerfully
        Pretty
        Picture
        Perfect

        And let's say to the "n" degree which is the letter just before p.

        Sharani
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.