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16543Re: Quadruple Wow!

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  • doriscott20002000
    Jan 31, 2006
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      Yes, it is an interesting thing.

      At the moment I have six birds from a friend to look after. One
      morning I discovered that one of them had just fallen from the bough
      and was dead. (And now I am reading the poem by D.H. Lawrence, see
      below.)

      I was surprised about the unexpected death of the bird because they
      were all flying cheerfully to and fro and I didn't notice any
      abnormal behaviour. I called the veterinarian and she told me that
      the bird was probably old. That's it.

      When I was young the thought that once I would have to leave the
      earth and I would not exist anymore was painful.

      Now I am so grateful to know that there is life after death (see
      also below)and to be frank I don't think much about it anymore. I am
      happy that time is flying! That's my feeling.

      Doris




      --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, richard13_oxford
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Dorris,
      >
      > I was interested in your story about how the deer met its death
      with
      > equanimity. Today I came across this poem by D.H.Lawrence.
      >
      >
      > Self Pity
      >
      > I never saw a wild thing
      > sorry for itself.
      > A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough
      > without ever having felt sorry for itself.
      >
      > D.H.Lawrence
      >
      > ~~~~~~~
      >
      > The great Sufi poet Rumi says this of death:
      >
      > A stone I died and rose again a plant;
      > A plant I died and rose an animal;
      > I died an animal and was born a man.
      > Why should I fear? What have I lost by death?
      >
      > - J.Rumi
      >
      >
      > With regard to death it seems that the animal kingdom has a lot to
      > teach us.
      >
      > Sri Chinmoy wrote this about death in a talk "Is Death the End?"
      >
      > http://www.srichinmoylibrary.com/sri-chinmoy-rose-
      petals/part1/1.html
      >
      >
      > "Death is not the end. Death can never be the end.
      > Death is the road. Life is the traveller. The soul is the guide."
      >
      > ....
      >
      > Sarada Devi, the consort of Sri Ramakrishna, said something very
      > significant. She said, "The difference between a spiritual man and
      an
      > ordinary man is very simple. Easily you can know the difference
      > between the two. An ordinary man cries and sheds bitter tears when
      > death approaches him; whereas a spiritual man, if he is really
      > spiritual, he will laugh and laugh when death approaches him, for
      to
      > him death is fun, nothing else".
      >
      > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      >
      > Death holds great fear for men, but studying and practising
      > spirituality helps us to appreciate a different perspective on
      death.
      >
      >
      >
      > Posted by Richard
      >
      > http://www.poetseers.org/
      > http://www.poetseers.org/themes/poems_about_death/
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, doriscott20002000
      > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hallo Sharani and Pavitrata,
      > >
      > > I can't tell you how I liked the deer pictures. They have
      something
      > > mystic. And what is it that makes a deer appearing so majestic?
      I
      > > watched the pictures for quite some time. I also liked the light
      > > effects, especially second and third picture.
      > >
      > > I heard once the story that when deer are hunted by someone one
      of
      > > them would 'consciously' sacrifice its life to save the other
      family
      > > members. (The hunter might think he was successful.)
      > >
      > > Early in the morning around 7.30 sometimes I saw deer near the
      place
      > > where I was living. Yes, they run away as soon they hear you
      running
      > > (in their eyes it may sound like trampling; oh, this human
      again...!
      > >
      > > Is it a coincidence? Just today Natika told us the story about a
      > > deer that crossed the street at night and ran into her car. She
      said
      > > it is an unforgetable experience and she was taught an important
      > > lesson.
      > >
      > > She got off the car to look after the deer. She said she saw in
      the
      > > eyes of the deer that it had totally surrendered to its fate.
      The
      > > eyes were saying: If I have to die I am fine, if there is a
      chance
      > > to survive that is also fine with me. The deer died a few
      minutes
      > > later. Somehow touching.
      > >
      > > Doris
      > >
      > > Doris
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com, pavitrata27
      > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Sharani
      > > >
      > > > Your enthusiasm for photography is very inspiring, you are
      doing
      > > so
      > > > well with your photographs.
      > > >
      > > > I eventually gave up on deer. They have a perception on a
      level
      > > that
      > > > I can't begin to understand. They simply know that you are
      aware
      > > of
      > > > them, and from a great distance too, and they get uneasy. The
      only
      > > > decent photograph I ever took of deer was when I thinking of
      > > > something else altogether and came to a clearing and there
      they
      > > > were, the shutter clicked in the silence and it must have
      sounded
      > > > like a hammer to them, they simply vanished leaving an empty
      > > > clearing, and the slightly out of focus grainy image. But it
      > > > captured the moment.
      > > >
      > > > Most early weekend mornings I was up in Richmond Park that
      summer,
      > > > it is big, seven miles in diameter, and deer have been there
      since
      > > > Henry V111's time. To get any decent wildlife photos one has
      to
      > > put
      > > > in the time to just sit and wait, but deer even know you are
      > > waiting
      > > > for them. Give me a swan any day, far more socially confident
      and
      > > > inquisitive.
      > > >
      > > > Re flash, I don't like it at best of times. Also, it is really
      > > > startling for animals, the eyes of many animals are far more
      > > > sensitive to light than humans.
      > > >
      > > > Deer have a higher concentration of rods (nighttime cells)
      than
      > > > humans, but a lower concentration of cones (daytime and color
      > > > cells). Therefore, deer have better night-time vision than
      humans
      > > > but poorer daytime and color vision.
      > > >
      > > > Deer have pupils that open wider than ours. This allows more
      light
      > > > to be gathered in low light conditions. So the impact of a
      flash
      > > at
      > > > night on a deer would be far more startling than to a human.
      > > >
      > > > Better use a high speed film, or if your digital camera has a
      high
      > > > sensitivity rating like ISO 400 or 800 use that.
      > > >
      > > > Anyway, thanks for the bespeak!
      > > >
      > > > pip-pip
      > > > Pavitrata
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In Sri_Chinmoy_Inspiration@yahoogroups.com,
      sharani_sharani
      > > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi everybody,
      > > > >
      > > > > I've been quite the busy bee with the camera this week,
      running
      > > the
      > > > > gamut from nautical ocean theme shots to cool clouds in the
      sky
      > > > and a
      > > > > belated visual for the minimalist grin poem about bare
      winter
      > > > trees.
      > > > >
      > > > > I was beginning to feel positively sated with satisfaction
      in the
      > > > > symphony of stuff to shoot in my surroundings at work.
      (Isn't it
      > > > fun
      > > > > to put words together that all start with the same sound?)
      > > > However, as
      > > > > I contemplated my good fortune, the thought crept to the
      surface
      > > of
      > > > > how I had never taken a photo of a deer yet, even though I
      had
      > > seen
      > > > > one in the summer when I didn't have my camera with me. On
      and
      > > off
      > > > for
      > > > > two days this week, I would muse about deers and notice that
      > > there
      > > > > were deer crossing signs along the highway, etc. I knew that
      > > right
      > > > > near the highway was not a good place to see deer. Yet the
      wish
      > > > > lingered as a simmering notion on the back burner of my
      > > awareness.
      > > > >
      > > > > I now know to always carry my camera at all times. Why some
      > > shots
      > > > this
      > > > > past week were taken seated in my car with the window rolled
      > > down.
      > > > I'm
      > > > > actually rather intrigued at the moment by the whole concept
      > > that
      > > > you
      > > > > can find wonderful photographs in the midst of latter day
      > > > civilization
      > > > > - cloud pictures taken from a shopping plaza parking lot
      across
      > > > from
      > > > > work, boats accented by a pier with litter nearby
      conveniently
      > > > cropped
      > > > > out. Maybe there's a way I could apply the notion to my own
      life
      > > > and
      > > > > zoom in on the good stuff and crop out the hard spots :-)
      > > > >
      > > > > Shardul really takes the cake though with photos taken in an
      > > > unusual
      > > > > position with his latest cow album. I expect he's got a post
      > > > drawing
      > > > > it to our attention in the current backlog of several days
      > > worth
      > > > of
      > > > > unposted messages :-( boo-hoo for message backlogs! If not,
      it's
      > > > the
      > > > > greatest and you really must take a look see! Him shooting
      > > photos
      > > > of
      > > > > cows from a horizontal position on the ground and the cows
      came
      > > > right
      > > > > up to him and the camera! Awesome!
      > > > >
      > > > > But back to today! As the library staff made the exodus home
      for
      > > > the
      > > > > weekend, we all ordinarily pile into our cars and peel
      away :-)
      > > > > I'm a little slower because I meditate for one minute before
      > > > driving.
      > > > > So I find I'm the only car left and all of the sudden I hear
      a
      > > > noise
      > > > > and about 15-20 feet to my left there is a deer munching on
      the
      > > > bushes
      > > > > that landscape the parking lot! Another one is on the edge
      of the
      > > > > parking lot amongst the wooded lot that abuts the library.
      > > > >
      > > > > Faster than you could say "doe a deer" I had my camera out,
      car
      > > > engine
      > > > > turned off, window rolled down and you guess the rest!
      Pretty
      > > soon
      > > > I
      > > > > was out of the car taking photos. Because the sun was just
      > > setting
      > > > as
      > > > > I saw them, it unfortunately got completely dark all too
      > > quickly. I
      > > > > suppose they purposely wait until evening to come out and
      feed. I
      > > > > tried my best to get some photos of these deer but the flash
      on
      > > my
      > > > > camera was rather inadequate. I must confess I have no clue
      if
      > > > there
      > > > > was some kind of manual setting I could have switched to
      which
      > > > would
      > > > > have created better pictures. On some level, I truly didn't
      care!
      > > > >
      > > > > Only two days after asking the universe for deer, I stood
      there
      > > > > beholding a total of four! That's why I say quadruple wow!
      > > > > Wasn't I just recently talking about seeing a rainbow on the
      > > trip
      > > > when
      > > > > people that lived there seemed certain I wouldn't? I am so
      lucky
      > > to
      > > > > ask and receive.
      > > > >
      > > > > Now I'm thinking... with this luck... I think I should start
      > > > invoking
      > > > > the Supreme Him/Herself... Nature's beauty offers a whisper
      of
      > > > God's
      > > > > Glory. Imagine the possibility of going straight to the
      source?
      > > > > Then instead of a rainbow, cloud, sun, deer chaser you'll
      have to
      > > > > christen me a bona fide divinity chaser :-) I wonder if
      anyone
      > > has
      > > > > ever taken a photo of the Absolute Supreme in a face-to-face
      > > > meeting.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > > Sharani
      > > > > p.s. a few somewhat blurry photos of the deer are in my
      album at
      > > > > http://tinyurl.com/d4pak
      > > > >
      > > > > p.p.s. I still remember Pavitrata talking about waiting for
      > > hours
      > > > to
      > > > > get a good deer photo when I shared with him about that
      > > children's
      > > > > book that shows deer eating the carrot nose of a snowman. I
      dare
      > > > say
      > > > > I'm especially indebted to him in stirring my interest in
      nature
      > > > and
      > > > > animal photography almost a year ago. Thanks Pavitrata!
      > > > >
      > > > > p.s. #3 I might take a record for exclamation points in
      this
      > > post.
      > > > > That must be me trying to convey my enthusiastic
      exhilaration
      > > about
      > > > > the deer.
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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