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PPL BFR at SP level

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  • Ralph
    Can someone tell me how a Private Pilot, without a medical, flying at the Sport Pilot level can get his BFR (biennial flight review)? Ralph
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 3, 2006
      Can someone tell me how a Private Pilot, without a medical, flying at
      the Sport Pilot level can get his BFR (biennial flight review)?

      Ralph
    • Jim DeWilder
      Ralph, I am cutting and pasting from a Sport Pilot question and answer URL I think from the EAA but am not sure. I was in the same boat as you and had no
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 3, 2006

        Ralph,

         

        I am cutting and pasting from a Sport Pilot question and answer URL I think from the EAA but am not sure. I was in the same boat as you and had no problem. Without a current medical, you cannot act as pilot in command. But if you let the instructor who is administering the BFR know that he will be the PIC, everything can go on as planned and he can still administer the BFR. Most, if not all, instructors will have no problem with this. In any event, here is the stuff cut and pasted from the EAA:

         

        Private Pilot Operating as Sport Pilot FAQs

        What does an existing private pilot need to do to fly as a sport pilot?
        As a private pilot, you have already been trained to a higher standard than a sport pilot. To operate as a sport pilot, you are "dropping down" and operating at a lower level. The primary advantage of operating as a sport pilot is that you can avoid the cost and hassle of maintaining a third class medical. You can use your valid state drivers license as your medical as long as your most recent medical application was not denied, suspended or revoked. If you use your drivers license to establish medical fitness, you must carry it with you when you fly.

        To operate as a sport pilot, you must

          • Operate day, VFR only
          • Carry your valid state drivers license
          • Self certify before each flight that you have no medical conditions that would jeopardize the safety of the flight
          • Fly an aircraft that meets the definition of a light-sport aircraft (LSA)
          • Fly only your approved category/class of LSA
          • Have a current flight review

        The main disadvantages of a operating as a sport pilot are that you're limited to a flying only an LSA, you cannot fly at night and are limited by the aircraft to one passenger.

        I don't have a current flight review and there are no aircraft available for rent that meet the definition of the LSA. Can I take my flight review with a CFI in an aircraft that is not a LSA?
        A flight review can be taken in any aircraft for which you are rated (i.e., any single engine land airplane if you have an Airplane-SEL category/class rating on your pilot certificate). However, without an FAA medical certificate, you will not be authorized to act as pilot in command (PIC) of an aircraft that does not meet the definition of a LSA. This means the CFI will need to act as PIC during the flight portion of the flight review. Make sure the CFI is aware of this situation before you begin the flight review.

         

         


        From: Sport_Aircraft@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Sport_Aircraft@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ralph
        Sent: Friday, November 03, 2006 5:58 PM
        To: Sport_Aircraft@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Sport_Aircraft] PPL BFR at SP level

         

        Can someone tell me how a Private Pilot, without a medical, flying at
        the Sport Pilot level can get his BFR (biennial flight review)?

        Ralph

      • dabzinc1@aol.com
        .In a message dated 11/3/2006 9:03:27 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Go to any Flight school that has a S-LSA plane available and ask for a flight review. Be
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 3, 2006
          .In a message dated 11/3/2006 9:03:27 PM Eastern Standard Time, rstar447@... writes:
          >Can someone tell me how a Private Pilot, without a medical, flying at
          >the Sport Pilot level can get his BFR (biennial flight review)?
          Go to any Flight school that has a S-LSA plane available and ask for a flight review. Be sure to bring your Drivers licence and be prepaired to self Certify you are fit to fly.  Oh and don't forget your Log Book. I also beleive you can use any plane for your reveiw. It doesn't have to be a LSA.  You just can't act be the  PIC.
           
          Bob
          47N
        • Herb Kushner
          Actually a flight review can be accomplished in ANY aircraft in which you are rated, so if you re a Private Pilot you can do your flight review in a regular
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 12, 2006
            Actually a flight review can be accomplished in ANY aircraft in
            which you are rated, so if you're a Private Pilot you can do your
            flight review in a regular airplane, not necessarily a Light Sport
            Plane. If you don't have a current medical then the CFI will be PIC
            for the review and when completed you'll be good to go with the
            review for your LSA.
            Herb K

            --- In Sport_Aircraft@yahoogroups.com, dabzinc1@... wrote:
            >
            >
            > .In a message dated 11/3/2006 9:03:27 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            > rstar447@... writes:
            >
            > >Can someone tell me how a Private Pilot, without a medical,
            flying at
            > >the Sport Pilot level can get his BFR (biennial flight review)?
            >
            >
            >
            > Go to any Flight school that has a S-LSA plane available and ask
            for a
            > flight review. Be sure to bring your Drivers licence and be
            prepaired to self
            > Certify you are fit to fly. Oh and don't forget your Log Book. I
            also beleive
            > you can use any plane for your reveiw. It doesn't have to be a
            LSA. You just
            > can't act be the PIC.
            >
            > Bob
            > 47N
            >
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