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[Fwd: [India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)]

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  • Vijay Barve
    ... Subject: [India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp) Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2008 09:37:14 +0530 From: Chaitra Ramaiah
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2008


      -------- Original Message --------
      Subject:[India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)
      Date:Fri, 1 Feb 2008 09:37:14 +0530
      From:Chaitra Ramaiah <kaadupaapa@...>
       


      Folks,

        Looking for the ecology of Nephila Spp. I guess the one found in India is the maculata. Spider experts correct me if I am wrong.

        Do they have a defined breeding season or do they breed throughout the year?
        Do they exhibit sexual dimorphism? What attributes do they show the disparity?
        I observed small sized spiders along with the larger sized ones in some of the webs during
        October/November. Are the small ones males?

        I have been visiting Bhadra from past few years and some how I end up visiting the forest during October/November.
        I used to observe myriads of these spiders casting their webs literally everywhere.

        This time I visited the place in the fall of December and couldn't see even one spider.

        I could only speculate that perhaps October/November were their breeding season where
        they are ubiquitously found and retire after they mate? Does this sound sane?
        If this is true, where do they go during off season? Do they coincide their breeding season
        with onset of winter where the rains would have subsided and insects are plenty owing to
        lots of flowers in bloom?

        Experts please throw some light on these aspects. Though I couldn't find even one Giant wood
        spider, I could see lots of tunnel web spiders.

      Regards,
      Chaitra




    • Sw Vanderwart
      Hi Chaitra, How about the indian Nephila kuhlii? They do exhibit sexual dimorphism. in fact Nephila is famous for it; the female is much larger than the male.
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 2, 2008
        Hi Chaitra,
         
        How about the indian Nephila kuhlii?
         
        They do exhibit sexual dimorphism. in fact Nephila is famous for it; the female is much larger than the male. Males don't live as long as females; the "task" of males is simply to reproduce. I'm not sure if a Nephila female needs to be fertilized once in her lifetime. When temperature drops they seek hidingplaces; maybe some arachnologist on this list can tell if they have anti-freeze in their blood like some amphibians have. I hope that I may have answered some of your questions; but I realize that I produced some new ones.
         
        Moderator of http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/cocoonswapping/
        Friedrich from the Netherlands
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 6:50 PM
        Subject: [SpiderIndia] [Fwd: [India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)]



        -------- Original Message --------

        Subject:[India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)
        Date:Fri, 1 Feb 2008 09:37:14 +0530
        From:Chaitra Ramaiah <kaadupaapa@gmail. com>
         


        Folks,

          Looking for the ecology of Nephila Spp. I guess the one found in India is the maculata. Spider experts correct me if I am wrong.

          Do they have a defined breeding season or do they breed throughout the year?
          Do they exhibit sexual dimorphism? What attributes do they show the disparity?
          I observed small sized spiders along with the larger sized ones in some of the webs during
          October/November. Are the small ones males?

          I have been visiting Bhadra from past few years and some how I end up visiting the forest during October/November.
          I used to observe myriads of these spiders casting their webs literally everywhere.

          This time I visited the place in the fall of December and couldn't see even one spider.

          I could only speculate that perhaps October/November were their breeding season where
          they are ubiquitously found and retire after they mate? Does this sound sane?
          If this is true, where do they go during off season? Do they coincide their breeding season
          with onset of winter where the rains would have subsided and insects are plenty owing to
          lots of flowers in bloom?

          Experts please throw some light on these aspects. Though I couldn't find even one Giant wood
          spider, I could see lots of tunnel web spiders.

        Regards,
        Chaitra




      • Nayan Singh
        Hi Friedrich and Chitra During my visits in the forest as director of the park, I observed the Nephila are very common with very big web during rainy season
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 4, 2008
          Hi Friedrich and Chitra
           
          During my  visits in the forest as director of the park, I observed the Nephila are very common with very big web during rainy season and up to Nov. One photo is attached, I think they are male and female
           
          N.S.Dungriyal
          Conservator of Forests
          and Field Director
          Pench Tiger Reserve Seoni
          M.P.
          07692-220794
          09424794106


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Sw Vanderwart <sw.vanderwart@...>
          To: SpiderIndia@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, 2 February, 2008 3:26:51 PM
          Subject: Re: [SpiderIndia] [Fwd: [India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)]

          Hi Chaitra,
           
          How about the indian Nephila kuhlii?
           
          They do exhibit sexual dimorphism. in fact Nephila is famous for it; the female is much larger than the male. Males don't live as long as females; the "task" of males is simply to reproduce. I'm not sure if a Nephila female needs to be fertilized once in her lifetime. When temperature drops they seek hidingplaces; maybe some arachnologist on this list can tell if they have anti-freeze in their blood like some amphibians have. I hope that I may have answered some of your questions; but I realize that I produced some new ones.
           
          Moderator of http://pets. groups.yahoo. com/group/ cocoonswapping/
          Friedrich from the Netherlands
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, February 01, 2008 6:50 PM
          Subject: [SpiderIndia] [Fwd: [India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)]



          -------- Original Message --------

          Subject:[India-nature- pixs] Ecology of Giant wood spider (nephila Spp)
          Date:Fri, 1 Feb 2008 09:37:14 +0530
          From:Chaitra Ramaiah <kaadupaapa@gmail. com>
           


          Folks,

            Looking for the ecology of Nephila Spp. I guess the one found in India is the maculata. Spider experts correct me if I am wrong.

            Do they have a defined breeding season or do they breed throughout the year?
            Do they exhibit sexual dimorphism? What attributes do they show the disparity?
            I observed small sized spiders along with the larger sized ones in some of the webs during
            October/November. Are the small ones males?

            I have been visiting Bhadra from past few years and some how I end up visiting the forest during October/November.
            I used to observe myriads of these spiders casting their webs literally everywhere.

            This time I visited the place in the fall of December and couldn't see even one spider.

            I could only speculate that perhaps October/November were their breeding season where
            they are ubiquitously found and retire after they mate? Does this sound sane?
            If this is true, where do they go during off season? Do they coincide their breeding season
            with onset of winter where the rains would have subsided and insects are plenty owing to
            lots of flowers in bloom?

            Experts please throw some light on these aspects. Though I couldn't find even one Giant wood
            spider, I could see lots of tunnel web spiders.

          Regards,
          Chaitra







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