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Re: [SpiderIndia] Haploclastus nilgirinus

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  • Neil Soares
    Hi Soren, Will keep in mind your suggestions when I come across another specimen in the wild. First identified as Plesiophrictus millardi, it was suggested by
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 1, 2007
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      Hi Soren,
      Will keep in mind your suggestions when I come
      across another specimen in the wild.
      First identified as Plesiophrictus millardi, it was
      suggested by one of our experts that it could be
      Haploclastus nilgirinus.[ Hence my initial request for
      confirmation of its identity].
      Sending you pictures of another tarantula commonly
      called the Goa Mustard Tarantula [Thrigmopoeus
      truculentus] for identification and your comments.
      Regards,
      Neil Soares.





      --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...> wrote:

      > Hi Neil
      >
      > At that adult size (remember the egg sac) it is most
      > likely one of the
      > smaller Chilobrachys species. For a second I
      > considered
      > Plesiophrictus, but these are considerably smaller
      > averaging 1-2 cm
      > body lenght. To be absolutely certain you need to
      > establish what sort
      > of stridulating organ that can be found on the
      > prolateral surface of
      > maxilla. In Haploclastus you will see a lot of fine
      > spines scattered
      > randomly on the surface below the suture line. In
      > Chilobrachys you
      > will find a "lyra" in the same area composed of a
      > lower row of strong
      > paddle shaped rods and several upper rows of strong
      > spines sometimes
      > with a dense brush of setae overhanging the
      > structure (most common in
      > the north-east indian/burmese species). In
      > Plesiophrictus there is no
      > stridulating organ. So I suggest you take a look for
      > yourself (take
      > photos please!) or send a shed exuviae to me for
      > proper
      > identification. My most tentative guess is still
      > that is is one of the
      > smaller species of Chilobrachys - at least it is
      > very similar to C.
      > nitelinus that I have observed in Sri Lanka. I have
      > attached two links
      > of what is generally considered by consensus to be
      > Haploclastus
      > nilgirinus, so you have an idea of the general
      > morphology of this nice
      > medium sized arboreal species:
      >
      > H. nilgirinus female:
      > http://www.minizoo.donetsk.ua/HaploclastusF1.jpg
      > H. nilgirinus male:
      > http://www.minizoo.donetsk.ua/HaploclastusM.jpg
      >
      > Kind regards
      > Søren
      >
      >
      > On 7/30/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Soren,
      > > The body length of the tarantula would be 30-35mm
      > > max.
      > > Regards,
      > > Neil.
      > >
      > > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Yes it's a beautiful species ;-) But unusual
      > for the
      > > > members of the
      > > > genus Chilobrachys in having chevron patterns
      > on the
      > > > abdomen. How big
      > > > were the specimen you observed in Garbat Point?
      > > >
      > > > Regards
      > > > Søren
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On 7/28/07, Neil Soares
      > <drneilsoares@...>
      > > > wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Soren,
      > > > > Chilobrachys fimbriatus, the common species
      > found
      > > > in
      > > > > and around Bombay are much larger. Sending
      > you a
      > > > > picture of one.
      > > > > Regards,
      > > > > Neil Soares.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...>
      > wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > Hi Neil ;-)
      > > > > >
      > > > > > To me it looks to be some sort of
      > Chilobrachys
      > > > > > species ;-) Feisty
      > > > > > little buggers ;-)
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Regards
      > > > > > Søren
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On 7/25/07, Neil Soares
      > > > <drneilsoares@...>
      > > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Hi,
      > > > > > > Photographed on the way to Garbat point,
      > > > Matheran
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Is this Haploclastus nilgirinus?
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Hoping to hear from Manju Siliwal again.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > With regards,
      > > > > > > Neil Soares.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      __________________________________________________________
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    • Søren Rafn
      Hi Neil This definetly looks like the real thing. The females of T. truculentus can become very large and can be reckognised by the darkened caput (the dark
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 1, 2007
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        Hi Neil

        This definetly looks like the real thing. The females of T.
        truculentus can become very large and can be reckognised by the
        darkened caput (the dark triangular area around the eye cluster),
        together with the strong front legs with prominent scopulae on tarsus
        and metatarsus. This is a very nice species.

        I have linked here to my own specimen which a friend of mine kindly
        offered me after a vacation in Goa:

        [IMG]http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/9021/thrigmopoeustruculentuske2.jpg%5b/IMG]

        Allow me to compliment you for your fine photographs. I am in the
        process of rewriting the second edition of my book about keeping
        tarantulas in captivity and wishes to include as many as possible
        pictures of species "in situ". Please allow me to contact you for
        imagery when the time is ripe?

        Kind regards
        Søren


        On 8/1/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Soren,
        > Will keep in mind your suggestions when I come
        > across another specimen in the wild.
        > First identified as Plesiophrictus millardi, it was
        > suggested by one of our experts that it could be
        > Haploclastus nilgirinus.[ Hence my initial request for
        > confirmation of its identity].
        > Sending you pictures of another tarantula commonly
        > called the Goa Mustard Tarantula [Thrigmopoeus
        > truculentus] for identification and your comments.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Neil Soares.
        >
        > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Hi Neil
        > >
        > > At that adult size (remember the egg sac) it is most
        > > likely one of the
        > > smaller Chilobrachys species. For a second I
        > > considered
        > > Plesiophrictus, but these are considerably smaller
        > > averaging 1-2 cm
        > > body lenght. To be absolutely certain you need to
        > > establish what sort
        > > of stridulating organ that can be found on the
        > > prolateral surface of
        > > maxilla. In Haploclastus you will see a lot of fine
        > > spines scattered
        > > randomly on the surface below the suture line. In
        > > Chilobrachys you
        > > will find a "lyra" in the same area composed of a
        > > lower row of strong
        > > paddle shaped rods and several upper rows of strong
        > > spines sometimes
        > > with a dense brush of setae overhanging the
        > > structure (most common in
        > > the north-east indian/burmese species). In
        > > Plesiophrictus there is no
        > > stridulating organ. So I suggest you take a look for
        > > yourself (take
        > > photos please!) or send a shed exuviae to me for
        > > proper
        > > identification. My most tentative guess is still
        > > that is is one of the
        > > smaller species of Chilobrachys - at least it is
        > > very similar to C.
        > > nitelinus that I have observed in Sri Lanka. I have
        > > attached two links
        > > of what is generally considered by consensus to be
        > > Haploclastus
        > > nilgirinus, so you have an idea of the general
        > > morphology of this nice
        > > medium sized arboreal species:
        > >
        > > H. nilgirinus female:
        > > http://www.minizoo.donetsk.ua/HaploclastusF1.jpg
        > > H. nilgirinus male:
        > > http://www.minizoo.donetsk.ua/HaploclastusM.jpg
        > >
        > > Kind regards
        > > Søren
        > >
        > >
        > > On 7/30/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi Soren,
        > > > The body length of the tarantula would be 30-35mm
        > > > max.
        > > > Regards,
        > > > Neil.
        > > >
        > > > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > Yes it's a beautiful species ;-) But unusual
        > > for the
        > > > > members of the
        > > > > genus Chilobrachys in having chevron patterns
        > > on the
        > > > > abdomen. How big
        > > > > were the specimen you observed in Garbat Point?
        > > > >
        > > > > Regards
        > > > > Søren
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > On 7/28/07, Neil Soares
        > > <drneilsoares@...>
        > > > > wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Hi Soren,
        > > > > > Chilobrachys fimbriatus, the common species
        > > found
        > > > > in
        > > > > > and around Bombay are much larger. Sending
        > > you a
        > > > > > picture of one.
        > > > > > Regards,
        > > > > > Neil Soares.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...>
        > > wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > > Hi Neil ;-)
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > To me it looks to be some sort of
        > > Chilobrachys
        > > > > > > species ;-) Feisty
        > > > > > > little buggers ;-)
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Regards
        > > > > > > Søren
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > On 7/25/07, Neil Soares
        > > > > <drneilsoares@...>
        > > > > > > wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Hi,
        > > > > > > > Photographed on the way to Garbat point,
        > > > > Matheran
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Is this Haploclastus nilgirinus?
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Hoping to hear from Manju Siliwal again.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > With regards,
        > > > > > > > Neil Soares.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > __________________________________________________________
        > > > > > > > Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search
        > > > > > > > that gives answers, not web links.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > http://mobile.yahoo.com/mobileweb/onesearch?refer=1ONXIC
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
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        > > >
        > >
        > __________________________________________________________
        > > > > > Get the free Yahoo! toolbar and rest assured
        > > with
        > > > > the added security of
        > > > > > spyware protection.
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
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        > http://new.toolbar.yahoo.com/toolbar/features/norton/index.php
        > > > >
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        > > > >
        > > >
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        > >
        > __________________________________________________________
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        > > > to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
        > > > http://travel.yahoo.com/
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        > > >
        > > >
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        >
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      • Neil Soares
        Hi Soren, Will do. Regards, Neil. ... [IMG]http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/9021/thrigmopoeustruculentuske2.jpg[/IMG] ... === message truncated ===
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 2, 2007
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          Hi Soren,
          Will do.
          Regards,
          Neil.
          --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...> wrote:

          > Hi Neil
          >
          > This definetly looks like the real thing. The
          > females of T.
          > truculentus can become very large and can be
          > reckognised by the
          > darkened caput (the dark triangular area around the
          > eye cluster),
          > together with the strong front legs with prominent
          > scopulae on tarsus
          > and metatarsus. This is a very nice species.
          >
          > I have linked here to my own specimen which a friend
          > of mine kindly
          > offered me after a vacation in Goa:
          >
          >
          [IMG]http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/9021/thrigmopoeustruculentuske2.jpg%5b/IMG]
          >
          > Allow me to compliment you for your fine
          > photographs. I am in the
          > process of rewriting the second edition of my book
          > about keeping
          > tarantulas in captivity and wishes to include as
          > many as possible
          > pictures of species "in situ". Please allow me to
          > contact you for
          > imagery when the time is ripe?
          >
          > Kind regards
          > Søren
          >
          >
          > On 8/1/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi Soren,
          > > Will keep in mind your suggestions when I come
          > > across another specimen in the wild.
          > > First identified as Plesiophrictus millardi, it
          > was
          > > suggested by one of our experts that it could be
          > > Haploclastus nilgirinus.[ Hence my initial
          > request for
          > > confirmation of its identity].
          > > Sending you pictures of another tarantula
          > commonly
          > > called the Goa Mustard Tarantula [Thrigmopoeus
          > > truculentus] for identification and your
          > comments.
          > >
          > > Regards,
          > > Neil Soares.
          > >
          > > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > > Hi Neil
          > > >
          > > > At that adult size (remember the egg sac) it is
          > most
          > > > likely one of the
          > > > smaller Chilobrachys species. For a second I
          > > > considered
          > > > Plesiophrictus, but these are considerably
          > smaller
          > > > averaging 1-2 cm
          > > > body lenght. To be absolutely certain you need
          > to
          > > > establish what sort
          > > > of stridulating organ that can be found on the
          > > > prolateral surface of
          > > > maxilla. In Haploclastus you will see a lot of
          > fine
          > > > spines scattered
          > > > randomly on the surface below the suture line.
          > In
          > > > Chilobrachys you
          > > > will find a "lyra" in the same area composed of
          > a
          > > > lower row of strong
          > > > paddle shaped rods and several upper rows of
          > strong
          > > > spines sometimes
          > > > with a dense brush of setae overhanging the
          > > > structure (most common in
          > > > the north-east indian/burmese species). In
          > > > Plesiophrictus there is no
          > > > stridulating organ. So I suggest you take a
          > look for
          > > > yourself (take
          > > > photos please!) or send a shed exuviae to me
          > for
          > > > proper
          > > > identification. My most tentative guess is
          > still
          > > > that is is one of the
          > > > smaller species of Chilobrachys - at least it
          > is
          > > > very similar to C.
          > > > nitelinus that I have observed in Sri Lanka. I
          > have
          > > > attached two links
          > > > of what is generally considered by consensus to
          > be
          > > > Haploclastus
          > > > nilgirinus, so you have an idea of the general
          > > > morphology of this nice
          > > > medium sized arboreal species:
          > > >
          > > > H. nilgirinus female:
          > > >
          > http://www.minizoo.donetsk.ua/HaploclastusF1.jpg
          > > > H. nilgirinus male:
          > > > http://www.minizoo.donetsk.ua/HaploclastusM.jpg
          > > >
          > > > Kind regards
          > > > Søren
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > On 7/30/07, Neil Soares
          > <drneilsoares@...>
          > > > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Hi Soren,
          > > > > The body length of the tarantula would be
          > 30-35mm
          > > > > max.
          > > > > Regards,
          > > > > Neil.
          > > > >
          > > > > --- Søren Rafn <ornithoctoninae@...>
          > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > > Yes it's a beautiful species ;-) But
          > unusual
          > > > for the
          > > > > > members of the
          > > > > > genus Chilobrachys in having chevron
          > patterns
          > > > on the
          > > > > > abdomen. How big
          > > > > > were the specimen you observed in Garbat
          > Point?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Regards
          > > > > > Søren
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > On 7/28/07, Neil Soares
          > > > <drneilsoares@...>
          > > > > > wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Hi Soren,
          > > > > > > Chilobrachys fimbriatus, the common
          > species
          > > > found
          > > > > > in
          > > > > > > and around Bombay are much larger.
          > Sending
          > > > you a
          > > > > > > picture of one.
          > > > > > > Regards,
          > > > > > > Neil Soares.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > --- Søren Rafn
          > <ornithoctoninae@...>
          > > > wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > Hi Neil ;-)
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > To me it looks to be some sort of
          > > > Chilobrachys
          > > > > > > > species ;-) Feisty
          > > > > > > > little buggers ;-)
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > Regards
          > > > > > > > Søren
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > On 7/25/07, Neil Soares
          > > > > > <drneilsoares@...>
          > > > > > > > wrote:
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          >
          === message truncated ===




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        • Manju Siliwal
          Hi Neil, Interesting discussion on Theraphosid is going on between you and Soren. Before guessing the genus I would like to ask you some more details. Can you
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 3, 2007
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            Hi Neil,
            Interesting discussion on Theraphosid is going on between you and Soren. Before guessing  the genus I would like to ask you some more details. Can you tell me the web structure of this spider (simple opening or a meshy silk at enterance with multiple openings and leading to main burrow)?  Where did you find these spiders (below rocks or burrowing in the soil or in shallow burrow in leaf litter)?
            As far as I know, the female of Chilobrachys spp. are bigger in size (except for the few Myanmar species, which could be based on imature or young females) and this is not an immature spider as it is with eggsac. Looking at the size of the animal I strongly feel that it is not a Chilobrachys sp. From picture, I guess the size of this spider about 2-3cms (cephalothorax and abdomen length), please correct me if i am wrong as my reference is based on the eggsac size. If this is the size then it fits into Plesiophrictus sp. or Annandaliella sp. or Plogiodes sp. which are now Haploclastus sp. It can't be Haploclastus nilgirinus because of the size and also looking at the geographical distance. From Matheran H. robustus, H. validus (many of them have been described from Maharashtra).  I agree with Soren that the species can be confirmed only by looking at their stridulatory structure present between Chelicerae and Maxillae. Can't say much on the species identity.
             
            Would like to hear more on this spider from  you.
             
            Manju Siliwal

             
            On 7/25/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...> wrote:


            Hi,
            Photographed on the way to Garbat point, Matheran

            Is this Haploclastus nilgirinus?

            Hoping to hear from Manju Siliwal again.

            With regards,
            Neil Soares.

            __________________________________________________________
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            that gives answers, not web links.
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          • Mandar Kulkarni
            Hi everbody, following Manju mams excellent post i would like to share that as per recent publication by M.Siliwal and S.molur, in maharashtra only two sp. of
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 4, 2007
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              Hi everbody, following Manju mams excellent post i would like to share that as per recent publication by M.Siliwal and S.molur, in maharashtra only two sp. of Haploclastus are recorded those are H.robustus and H.validus.
               
              Mandar.

              Manju Siliwal <manjusiliwal@...> wrote:
              Hi Neil,
              Interesting discussion on Theraphosid is going on between you and Soren. Before guessing  the genus I would like to ask you some more details. Can you tell me the web structure of this spider (simple opening or a meshy silk at enterance with multiple openings and leading to main burrow)?  Where did you find these spiders (below rocks or burrowing in the soil or in shallow burrow in leaf litter)?
              As far as I know, the female of Chilobrachys spp. are bigger in size (except for the few Myanmar species, which could be based on imature or young females) and this is not an immature spider as it is with eggsac. Looking at the size of the animal I strongly feel that it is not a Chilobrachys sp. From picture, I guess the size of this spider about 2-3cms (cephalothorax and abdomen length), please correct me if i am wrong as my reference is based on the eggsac size. If this is the size then it fits into Plesiophrictus sp. or Annandaliella sp. or Plogiodes sp. which are now Haploclastus sp. It can't be Haploclastus nilgirinus because of the size and also looking at the geographical distance. From Matheran H. robustus, H. validus (many of them have been described from Maharashtra) .  I agree with Soren that the species can be confirmed only by looking at their stridulatory structure present between Chelicerae and Maxillae. Can't say much on the species identity.
               
              Would like to hear more on this spider from  you.
               
              Manju Siliwal

               
              On 7/25/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@ yahoo.com> wrote:

              Hi,
              Photographed on the way to Garbat point, Matheran

              Is this Haploclastus nilgirinus?

              Hoping to hear from Manju Siliwal again.

              With regards,
              Neil Soares.

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            • Neil Soares
              Hi Manju, Nice to hear from you after such a long time. We were in Matheran on a herpetology outing. Sameer Kehimkar and I shifted a huge log and the spider
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 6, 2007
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                Hi Manju,
                Nice to hear from you after such a long time.
                We were in Matheran on a herpetology outing. Sameer
                Kehimkar and I shifted a huge log and the spider was
                under it, so we didn't have any chance of observing
                the enterance to its burrow.
                Its size as I have mentioned was 30-35mm
                [cephalothorax and abdomen]max.
                Hope you will be able to identify it.
                Regards,
                Neil.


                --- Manju Siliwal <manjusiliwal@...> wrote:

                > Hi Neil,
                > Interesting discussion on Theraphosid is going on
                > between you and Soren.
                > Before guessing the genus I would like to ask you
                > some more details. Can
                > you tell me the web structure of this spider (simple
                > opening or a meshy silk
                > at enterance with multiple openings and leading to
                > main burrow)? Where did
                > you find these spiders (below rocks or burrowing in
                > the soil or in shallow
                > burrow in leaf litter)?
                > As far as I know, the female *of Chilobrachys* spp.
                > are bigger in size
                > (except for the few Myanmar species, which could be
                > based on imature or
                > young females) and this is not an immature spider as
                > it is with eggsac.
                > Looking at the size of the animal I strongly feel
                > that it is not a *
                > Chilobrachys* sp. From picture, I guess the size of
                > this spider about 2-3cms
                > (cephalothorax and abdomen length), please correct
                > me if i am wrong as my
                > reference is based on the eggsac size. If this is
                > the size then it fits into
                > *Plesiophrictus* sp. or *Annandaliella* sp. or
                > *Plogiodes *sp. which are now
                > *Haploclastus* sp. It can't be *Haploclastus
                > nilgirinus* because of the
                > size and also looking at the geographical distance.
                > From Matheran *H.
                > robustus*, *H. validus *(many of them have been
                > described from Maharashtra).
                > I agree with Soren that the species can be
                > confirmed only by looking at
                > their stridulatory structure present between
                > Chelicerae and Maxillae. Can't
                > say much on the species identity.
                >
                > Would like to hear more on this spider from you.
                >
                > Manju Siliwal
                >
                >
                > On 7/25/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > Hi,
                > > Photographed on the way to Garbat point, Matheran
                > >
                > > Is this Haploclastus nilgirinus?
                > >
                > > Hoping to hear from Manju Siliwal again.
                > >
                > > With regards,
                > > Neil Soares.
                > >
                > >
                >
                __________________________________________________________
                > > Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search
                > > that gives answers, not web links.
                > >
                >
                http://mobile.yahoo.com/mobileweb/onesearch?refer=1ONXIC
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >




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              • Søren Rafn
                Hi Manju ;-) The problem with identification of most uniformly coloured spiders is that they are not giving too many characters to work with at a glance.
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 7, 2007
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                  Hi Manju ;-)

                  The problem with identification of most uniformly coloured spiders is
                  that they are not giving too many characters to work with at a glance.
                  That's why I underlined that the only certain way to determine this
                  spider is to look at the structure of the stridulating organ - or the
                  absence of that same structure. Secondary characters are the retreat
                  architecture. But as it is also this can be misleading since the local
                  conditions and the species determine the structure of entrance and
                  burrow, though I will agree that the small ischnocoliine spiders
                  usually have more messy and multiple entranced retreats than the
                  larger species from other subfamilies. For instance both Chilobrachys
                  nitelinus from Sri Lanka and Chilobrachys fumosus from Assam both have
                  multiple entrances and generally are small bodied spiders, which can
                  superficially be mistaken for Plesiophrictus untill you uncover the
                  stridulating organ. I assume that there will be found similarly sized
                  Chilobrachys species in the range in between these two species, with
                  the same kind of retreat architecture. This is why I do not outrule
                  Chilobrachys. That said both the larger species of Plesiophrictus and
                  Annandaliella could also be candidates for this specimen. I doubt that
                  Haploclastus is the ultimate name tag though - as most Haploclastus
                  are medium to very large species. A more conclusive secondary
                  character also outrules Haploclastus as all Haploclastus (and
                  Thrigmopoeus) has fixed hammock type eggsacs - not mobile spherical
                  eggsacs as seen with the spider in the picture.

                  I have attached a few pictures of Indian/Sri Lankan Chilobrachys
                  species just to give you an idea of the variation of the members in
                  this genus:

                  Chilobrachys fumosus from Assam:
                  http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/5438/idta0.jpg

                  Chilobrachys stridulans from Bangladeshi border:
                  http://img174.imageshack.us/img174/8652/chilobrachysmasonifemalsn0.jpg

                  Chilobrachys nitelinus from Sri Lanka:
                  http://img364.imageshack.us/img364/9596/cnitelinusf2w6zk.jpg

                  Unidentified North Indian Chilobrachys species:
                  http://img124.imageshack.us/img124/7518/89502262ip9.jpg

                  Yet another unidentified north indian Chilobrachys species:
                  http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/7745/098oc2.jpg

                  Unidentified South Indian species (related to C. fimbriatus):
                  http://img451.imageshack.us/img451/6932/chilobrachyshardwicki028hg.jpg

                  So as you can see the variation in shape and colour is quite wide, so
                  I wouldn't outrule Chilobrachys ;-)

                  Friendly regards
                  Søren


                  On 8/4/07, Manju Siliwal <manjusiliwal@...> wrote:

                  > Hi Neil,
                  > Interesting discussion on Theraphosid is going on between you and Soren.
                  > Before guessing the genus I would like to ask you some more details. Can
                  > you tell me the web structure of this spider (simple opening or a meshy silk
                  > at enterance with multiple openings and leading to main burrow)? Where did
                  > you find these spiders (below rocks or burrowing in the soil or in shallow
                  > burrow in leaf litter)?
                  > As far as I know, the female of Chilobrachys spp. are bigger in size (except
                  > for the few Myanmar species, which could be based on imature or young
                  > females) and this is not an immature spider as it is with eggsac. Looking at
                  > the size of the animal I strongly feel that it is not a Chilobrachys sp.
                  > From picture, I guess the size of this spider about 2-3cms (cephalothorax
                  > and abdomen length), please correct me if i am wrong as my reference is
                  > based on the eggsac size. If this is the size then it fits into
                  > Plesiophrictus sp. or Annandaliella sp. or Plogiodes sp. which are now
                  > Haploclastus sp. It can't be Haploclastus nilgirinus because of the size and
                  > also looking at the geographical distance. From Matheran H. robustus, H.
                  > validus (many of them have been described from Maharashtra). I agree with
                  > Soren that the species can be confirmed only by looking at their
                  > stridulatory structure present between Chelicerae and Maxillae. Can't say
                  > much on the species identity.
                  >
                  > Would like to hear more on this spider from you.
                  >
                  > Manju Siliwal
                  >
                  >
                  > On 7/25/07, Neil Soares <drneilsoares@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Hi,
                  > > Photographed on the way to Garbat point, Matheran
                  > >
                  > > Is this Haploclastus nilgirinus?
                  > >
                  > > Hoping to hear from Manju Siliwal again.
                  > >
                  > > With regards,
                  > > Neil Soares.
                  > >
                  > > __________________________________________________________
                  > > Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search
                  > > that gives answers, not web links.
                  > > http://mobile.yahoo.com/mobileweb/onesearch?refer=1ONXIC
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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