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2692Re: [Spanish_English_Translation_Help_Group] D uda: "Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia"

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  • Roy McCoy
    Apr 7, 2013
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      Daniel wrote:

      > On a social network the other day, I noticed a sentence structure (“Aquí se
      > ve major a Emilia”) that got me wondering. The lady had posted a picture of
      > two granddaughters and wants to point out that people can see Emilia better
      > in the photo she posted online. What's the difference between?
      >
      > 1.) Aquí se ve mejor Emilia.
      >
      > and
      >
      > 2.) Aquí se ve mejor a Emilia.

      In the first "Emilia" is the subject, with reflexive "verse" in the sense
      of "to be seen", while in the second it is an object following "a", the
      sentence being equivalent, I suppose, to "Aquí uno ve mejor a Emilia."

      > Is there a better way to word this when talking about people can get a
      > better view of Emilia in that picture as opposed to another picture or
      > setting?

      As a non-native speaker I can't say, but I think it's clear with the "a".
      If you felt there was a problem with "se ve" despite the "a", you could
      say "aquí se puede ver" - which is enormously common, with 44,200,000
      Google finds in my browser. Ah, but "aquí se ve" turns out to be far more
      common, with nearly 200,000,000 finds.

      > I'm assuming the first sentence talks about how Emilia looks in that
      > particular picture while in the second statement, the speaker is making a
      > general statement (impersonal "se" with a direct object), saying that people
      > (in general) can get a better look at Emilia in that particular. Am I
      > understanding this correctly?

      That's my understanding.

      > Is sentence #2 something that people would say in any part of the
      > Spanish-speaking world or is it a structure (with this passive/impersonal
      > meaning) something more common in South American, or more specifically,
      > in the Cono Sur or the Río de la Plata region?

      It looks pretty ordinary to me.


      Roy
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