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Today show predicts rising sea levels frightening many.

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  • Robert Blake
    The Today show just reported rising sea levels might amount to as much as 4 feet in the next century. This is frightening. Flagstaff, with its hills and
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 5, 2007
      The Today show just reported rising sea levels might amount to as
      much as 4 feet in the next century.

      This is frightening.

      Flagstaff, with its hills and valleys averages 7,000 feet above sea
      level.

      This would reduce that average to only 6,996 feet!!!!!!!

      That sounds safe.

      But, what if there is an extra high high tide????????

      Some people could take refuge on Mars Hill-it towers hundreds of
      feet higher than downtown Flagstaff-which is situated in a floodplain-
      --and, it is only one mile from City Hall.

      The extra cautious might go ten miles north of Mars Hill to the
      Horchderfer Hills----which top out at 9,200 feet. Go north on Hwy. 89
      as if driving to the Grand Canyon----park at the Flagstaff Nordic Ski
      Center and run (don't walk) up the ski trails into the Horchderfer
      Hills.

      Those truly paranoid might go up into the San Francisco/Kachina Peaks
      which have two peaks at over 12,000 feet and one at 11,969 feet.

      But, don't forget, Agassiz Peak is off limits because it has
      Arizona's only Arctic Tundra and can not be traversed even when the
      snow cover is very deep. In winter. Sometimes in summer.

      Past posts of links have not worked well at this site. To find more
      information on the Arctic tundra in Arizona-use:
      http://www.google.com and the search terms: "Agassiz Peak"
      amd "Arctic tundra"

      One can hike around the base of Agassiz Peak. The Humphrey's Trail
      goes to the saddle between Agassiz Peak and Humphrey's Peak-where one
      finds the remains of an old dirt road that once allowed cars up to
      about 12,000 feet but which is now in a Wilderness area---you can't
      drive it. At the S.E. end of Agassiz Peak is a saddle with a cut off
      tree that matches the angle to mount a telescope's equatorial mount.
      Lowell Observatory once mounted a high altitude telescope here and
      planned on an observatory at the site---but, the wash below the
      saddle is in the direction from whence come the predominant winds.
      This channeled even the slightest breeze at the telescope and made
      for unsteady seeing.

      Something to contemplate while the high tide waves lap at your feet
      and you try to decide if you want to risk the fines for trampling the
      Arctic tundra of Agassiz Peak.
    • Spirit of the Night
      Well, from in here Florida, at 60 feet above sea level, we can really feel for you guys in Arizona. Just don t expect us to help you with the moving... we ll
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 5, 2007
        Well, from in here Florida, at 60 feet above sea level, we can really
        feel for you guys in Arizona. Just don't expect us to help you with
        the moving... we'll already be fish food!

        --- In Southern_Nights@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Blake"
        <xcoconino9@...> wrote:
        >
        > The Today show just reported rising sea levels might amount to as
        > much as 4 feet in the next century.
        >
        > This is frightening.
        >
        > Flagstaff, with its hills and valleys averages 7,000 feet above sea
        > level.
        >
        > This would reduce that average to only 6,996 feet!!!!!!!
        >
        > That sounds safe.
        >
        > But, what if there is an extra high high tide????????
        >
        > Some people could take refuge on Mars Hill-it towers hundreds of
        > feet higher than downtown Flagstaff-which is situated in a floodplain-
        > --and, it is only one mile from City Hall.
        >
        > The extra cautious might go ten miles north of Mars Hill to the
        > Horchderfer Hills----which top out at 9,200 feet. Go north on Hwy. 89
        > as if driving to the Grand Canyon----park at the Flagstaff Nordic Ski
        > Center and run (don't walk) up the ski trails into the Horchderfer
        > Hills.
        >
        > Those truly paranoid might go up into the San Francisco/Kachina Peaks
        > which have two peaks at over 12,000 feet and one at 11,969 feet.
        >
        > But, don't forget, Agassiz Peak is off limits because it has
        > Arizona's only Arctic Tundra and can not be traversed even when the
        > snow cover is very deep. In winter. Sometimes in summer.
        >
        > Past posts of links have not worked well at this site. To find more
        > information on the Arctic tundra in Arizona-use:
        > http://www.google.com and the search terms: "Agassiz Peak"
        > amd "Arctic tundra"
        >
        > One can hike around the base of Agassiz Peak. The Humphrey's Trail
        > goes to the saddle between Agassiz Peak and Humphrey's Peak-where one
        > finds the remains of an old dirt road that once allowed cars up to
        > about 12,000 feet but which is now in a Wilderness area---you can't
        > drive it. At the S.E. end of Agassiz Peak is a saddle with a cut off
        > tree that matches the angle to mount a telescope's equatorial mount.
        > Lowell Observatory once mounted a high altitude telescope here and
        > planned on an observatory at the site---but, the wash below the
        > saddle is in the direction from whence come the predominant winds.
        > This channeled even the slightest breeze at the telescope and made
        > for unsteady seeing.
        >
        > Something to contemplate while the high tide waves lap at your feet
        > and you try to decide if you want to risk the fines for trampling the
        > Arctic tundra of Agassiz Peak.
        >
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