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Operation Mockingbird /CIA propaganda directed at Americans part 1

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  • DickM
    Copyrighted Nov. 12, 2011 Chain of Command for operation Mockingbird: White House: President Dwight D. Eisenhower Chairman of the Committee on Foreign
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 12, 2011

      Copyrighted Nov. 12, 2011

       

      Chain of Command for operation Mockingbird:

       

      White House:  President Dwight D. Eisenhower

       

      Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Information Activities:

                                                William Harding Jackson, II   (1953 and 1954)

                                                                          Nelson Rockefeller ( ?? to 1953)

                            Member:    C.D.  Jackson  (Early 1953 to ??)

      Special Assistant for National Security Affairs:

                                            William Harding Jackson, II   (1956-1957)

       

      Administration assistant for psychological warfare :

                                                           Charles Douglas ("C.D.") Jackson  (Early 1953 to Jan. 1954)

      During WW II he served in propaganda operations and served in Radio Free Europe from 1951 to 1952. From 1954 through 1959 he returned to Time, Life, and Fortune magazines where he  had a lifelong association.

       

              Chief of Propaganda operations:        Desmond FitzGerald                (?? to 1963 )

                                                                                                Edgar Applewhite             (Nov. 1954 To ??)

                                CIA officer:   Wistar M. Janney   

       oversaw the CIA funding of groups such as the National Student Association, the Congress of Cultural Freedom, Communications Workers of America, the American Newspaper Guild and the National Educational Association. … provided the money for publishing the journal, Encounter… worked closely with anti-Communist leaders of the trade union movement such as George Meany of the Congress for Industrial Organization and the American Federation of Labor.

                                                

      Contract agents:                               Irving Brown     (AFL union boss  

                                                               Jay Lovestone    (Ladies Garment Workers Union boss)

      He hired for his union's New York regional director, John Dioguardi, member of the Lucchese mafia family.  He was blamed by US Attorney Paul Williams for blinding a labor journalist Victor Riesel and subsequent murder of the man who threw acid in Riesel's face.

                                                                                

                           CIA-front organizations:    USIA's Radio Liberty

                                                                      Congress for Cultural Freedom 

                                                                                                                          

              Chief of Operation Mockingbird:  Frank G. Wisner      (1947 to 1957)

                  Information warfare/propaganda directed at Americans   

                                                             Allen W. Dulles                 (4 Jan. 1951 - 23 Aug 1951) 

                                 CIA officer:   Richard M. Helms      

                        CIA officer:  Robert "Bob" T. Crowley  

                          He stated that the CIA used PR firms like the Hill and Knowlton's (H&K).

       

                             American reporter and contract agent:  Priscilla Johnson

       

                              American reporter and contract agent:    Arline Mosby                                                          

      Johnson and Mosby interviewed Lee Harvey Oswald when he defected to the Soviet Union in October, 1959.   http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=8045

       

           David Atlee Phillips joined the CIA as a part-time agent in 1950 in Chile, where he owned and edited The South Pacific Mail, an English-language newspaper that circulated throughout South America and several islands in the Pacific.

       

           CIA officer Robert "Bob" T. Crowley stated that the CIA used PR firms like the Hill and Knowlton's (H&K) "to put out press releases and make media contacts to further its positions. ...H&K employees at the small Washington office and elsewhere distributed this material through CIA assets working in the United Stated news media." "Hill and Knowlton's overseas offices were perfect cover for the ever-expanding CIA. Unlike other cover jobs, being a public relations specialist did not require technical training for CIA officers."  News organizations ordered their employees to cooperate with the CIA, including the San Diego-based Copley News Service.

       

           Among the executives who lent their cooperation to the CIA were William Paley of the Columbia Broadcasting System, Henry Luce of Time Inc., Arthur Hays Sulzberger of the New York Times, Barry Bingham Sr. of the Louisville Courier-Journal and James Copley of the Copley News Service. Other organizations which cooperated with the CIA include the American Broadcasting Company, the National Broadcasting Company, the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, Hearst Newspapers, Scripps-Howard, Newsweek magazine, the Mutual Broadcasting System, The Miami Herald, and the old Saturday Evening Post and New York Herald-Tribune. By far the most valuable of these associations, according to CIA officials, have been with The New York Times, CBS, and Time Inc.

           William Colby exclaimed at one point to the Church committee's investigators. "Let's go to the managements. They were witting" In all, about twenty-five news organizations (including those listed at the beginning of this article) provided cover for the Agency... http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=8574

       

           In 1958 the book, Masters of Deceit was published.   It was supposedly written by FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, and it be­came a massive bestseller. In truth, the book has been written by four for five Bureau agents assigned to the job and is finally polished up by Fern Stukenbroeker, an agent with a Ph. D. who works in Crime Records. FBI agents all over the country are required to promote the book and to place "reviews" -- written in advance at the Bureau -- with friendly newspapers. A controlling interest in Henry Holt, the publisher, is owned by Clint Murchison. Murchison virtually instructs the company to buy the book and expresses his desire that Hoover be given an especially favorable contract. On February 9, 1958 J. Edgar Hoover announces that he intends to give all of his royalties from his book, to the FBI Recreational Association. No one thinks to ask Hoover what this association is. In reality, it is a slush fund estab­lished for Hoover, Clyde Tolson and key FBI aides. It is also a money laundering operation so Hoover will not have to pay taxes on his book royalties. When the television series "The FBI" premieres in 1965 and runs for nine years, Hoover receives a $500 payment for each episode. Every cent goes into the FBI Recreational Association.

       

       

       

      CIA chain of Command for Mockingbird under other Presidents:

       

       

      CIA Director                           William Colby    (1973 to or Nov. 1975? or 30 January 1976 ??)

      Director of Central Intelligence   Lt. Gen Vernon A.Walters             ( two months in mid-1973)                                                                                                                                                                                                    

                                                                           James Schlesinger                    (early 1973 to 1973)

                                                            Richard M. Helms        (June 1965 fired Feb. 1973)                                                          

       

      Angleton's deputy:    Richard Ober   Had an office in the White House 

       

                                                                                                                                    

      Deputy Director of CIA:      Lt. Gen. Vernon A. Walters            (May 1972 to July 1976)       

                                                        William Colby                                      (Dec. 1971 to May 1972)

                                              Gen Robert E. Cushman, Jr.                     (May 1969 to Dec. 1971)

                                        Vice Admiral Rufus L. Taylor                       (Oct. 1966 to Feb 1969)

        

                       Assistant Deputy Director:           Lt. Gen. Daniel Graham              (1973 to 1974)   

                                                                                Ray S. Cline                       (Jan. 17, 1966 to 1969)  

                                   

      Deputy Director for Operation:(DDO) 

                                                                               William E. Nelson         (Aug. 24, 1973 to May 14, 1976)

                                                                                   William E. Colby         (Mar. 2, 1973 to Aug. 24, 1973)

                                                                     Thomas H. Karamessines        (July 31, 1967 - Feb. 27, 1973)

       

            Assistant Deputy Director:    Robert T. Crowley                  (?? To ??)

                                                          Ted Shackley                         (May 1976 to Dec. 1977)  

                                                          Thomas Clines   ??               (Nov. 1975 to Dec. 1976?)

                                                         Cord Meyer                            (July 31, 1967 to 1973)

                                                         Ted Shackley   ??                (1971 to early 1973 ??)                                                                      

                                                        Thomas "Tom" H.  Karamessines   (Apr. 1962 to 31 July 1967)

                                                         Lt. Gen. Marshall Carter, USA          (Feb. 1962 to Apr. 1962)

                                                                                Richard C. Helms      (Jan 1959 to Feb. 1962)       

              Karasemmines and his trusted associate George Joannides

       

      Chief of Operation Mockingbird:      Unknown

                                                                   E. Howard Hunt                (1962 to 1966?)

                                                                    Edgar Applewhite            (?? To ??)

       

      Hunt told the Senate Watergate Committee in 1973 that he had fabricated the cables to show a link between President Kennedy and the assassination of Diem, a Catholic, to estrange Catholic voters from the Democratic Party.  JFK's orders were in fact for Diem to be kidnapped and moved to a third country.

       

              Chief of Operation Mockingbird:    Robert "Bob" T. Crowley   (1961 to

      Crowley served in the US Army in the Pacific theater during World War II in military intelligence and Naval Intelligence.   After the war, he remained in the United States Army Reserve.  He was a long-time liaison with corporations.   Corporations like ITT were often used by the CIA as fronts for moving large amounts of cash off their books.    Crowley's real expertise within the CIA was learning and knowing the make-up of the Soviet KGB.  Crowley was a close friend of James Jesus Angleton.

       

      Crowley stated that the CIA used PR firms like the Hill and Knowlton's (H&K) "to put out press releases and make media contacts to further its positions. ...H&K employees at the small Washington office and elsewhere distributed this material through CIA assets working in the United Stated news media." "Hill and Knowlton's overseas offices were perfect cover for the ever-expanding CIA. Unlike other cover jobs, being a public relations specialist did not require technical training for CIA officers."  News organizations ordered their employees to cooperate with the CIA, including the San Diego-based Copley News Service.

                          American reporter and contract agent:      Priscilla L. Johnson

      In 1953 Johnson went to work for Senator John F. Kennedy.

      On 6th May, 1958, the Chief of CI/OA submitted a request for operational approval on Johnson. The operation for which she was being considered is still classified.

       

                              American reporter and contract agent:    Arline Mosby                                                           

      Johnson and Mosby interviewed Lee Harvey Oswald when he defected to the Soviet Union in October, 1959.   http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=8045

       

      A journalist possibly undercover CIA officer agent Priscilla Johnson As a student she was a member of the United World Federalists another front run by Meyer.

       

      CIA friendly reporters and editors who covered Cuba in the mid-1970s

      Hal Hendrix (AM/CARBON-1) Miami News in 1960s

        And was the journalist for Latin America for the Scripps-Howard News Service in 1963.

      Al Burt probably (AM/CARBON-2) was probably, Bohning's predecessor as Latin America editor at the Miami Herald. 

      Don  Bohning (AMCARBON-3)  (?? 1967  to ??) Latin America editors at the Miami Herald:  he was a CIA contract agent/operative.

       In 1948, Frank Wisner was appointed director of the Office of Special Projects (OSP). Soon afterwards OSP was renamed the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This became the Espionage and Counter-intelligence branch of the Central Intelligence Agency. Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including Sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures; subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements in threatened countries of the free world

       

      Later that year Wisner established operation Mockingbird, a program to influence the domestic and foreign media.  . The CIA wanted these journalists not only to relay any sensitive information they discovered- to spy for them, but also to write anti-communist, pro-capitalist propaganda when needed.   The instigators of MOCKINGBIRD were Frank Wisner, Allan Dulles, Richard Helms and Philip Graham. Graham was the husband of Katherine Graham, today's publisher of the Washington Post. In fact, it was the Post's ties to the CIA that allowed it to grow so quickly after the war, both in readership and influence.

       

           Journalism is a perfect cover for CIA agents. People talk freely to journalists, and few think suspiciously of a journalist aggressively searching for information. Journalists also have power, influence and clout. Not surprisingly, the CIA began a mission in the late 1940s to recruit American journalists on a wide scale, a mission it dubbed Operation MOCKINGBIRD. The agency wanted these journalists not only to relay any sensitive information they discovered, but also to write anti-communist, pro-capitalist propaganda when needed.

       

           According to Alex Constantine (Mockingbird: The Subversion Of The Free Press By The CIA), in the 1950s, "some 3,000 salaried and contract CIA employees were eventually engaged in propaganda efforts". Wisner was also able to restrict newspapers from reporting about certain events. For example, the CIA plots to overthrow the governments of Iran (Operation Ajax) and Guatemala (Operation PB-SUCCESS).

       

      MOCKINGBIRD was extraordinarily successful. In no time, the agency had recruited at least 25 media organizations to disseminate CIA propaganda. At least 400 journalists would eventually join the CIA payroll, according to the CIA's testimony before a stunned Church Committee in 1975. (The committee felt the true number was considerably higher.) The names of those recruited reads like a Who's Who of journalism:

      ·    Philip and Katharine Graham (Publishers, Washington Post)

      ·    William Paley (President, CBS)

      ·    Henry Luce (Publisher, Time and Life magazine)

      ·    Arthur Hays Sulzberger (Publisher, N.Y. Times)

      ·    Jerry O'Leary (Washington Star)

      ·    Hal Hendrix (Pulitzer Prize winner, Miami News)

      ·    Barry Bingham Sr., (Louisville Courier-Journal)

      ·    James Copley (Copley News Services)

      ·    Joseph Harrison (Editor, Christian Science Monitor)

      ·    C.D. Jackson (Fortune)

      ·    Walter Pincus (Reporter, Washington Post)

      ·    ABC

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