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Re: THW Nuts: Working on a solo "Hidden" approach

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  • aconite13
    ... Another simple solution that doesn t require you to place cards, tokens, or figures out would be: 1. prepare a table or set of cards for possible ambush
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 2 10:59 AM
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      --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "Bob George" <bobstro@...> wrote:
      >(SNIP)

      Another simple solution that doesn't require you to place cards,
      tokens, or figures out would be:
      1. prepare a table or set of cards for possible ambush opponents
      based on what makes sense for your game - single sniper designed just
      to slow you down more likely than the King Tiger that Sgt. Rock's
      group always seemed to find. sniper plus spotter for a few mortar
      rounds. ## men in improvised cover, ## men split to cover an area
      with overlapping fields of fire, a machine gun nest, a whole platoon
      etc. You can either set the likelihood by the numbers of cards of
      each type in the deck, or %ages in your table.

      2. on each turn,roll a % dice for "does an ambush occur this turn?
      You could bias this in any way you want - start at 10% and add 5 each
      subsequent turn until one occurs, or however you like it.

      3. If an ambush occurs, pull your top card, & see what it is. Then
      you place it where it makes sense (e.g. sniper in the bell tower,
      Tiger in a building, etc. You can either put them where it seems most
      likely, or if multiple choices, roll for it (## men in rubble to the
      right, brick building ahead, or treeline nearby to the left?)

      4. do normal sighting / activatin / whatever for each side to see who
      gets the drop.

      5. kill the hun and proceed on patrol. Reset the % for "is there an
      ambush this turn" as the tactical picture dictates (if you've just
      cleaned a platoon out of the town, perhaps not as likely for another
      ambush then if it was just a sniper, or 2-5 men.

      6. continue until patrol completes its mission

      Haven't gotten out the sacred tomes yet, but this occurred to me while
      running errands.

      John
    • Bob George
      I wanted to follow up on this thread with some results that worked out fairly well. Since my original post, I ve been working through various possibilities,
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 22, 2008
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        I wanted to follow up on this thread with some results that worked out
        fairly well. Since my original post, I've been working through various
        possibilities, and I finally had a chance to play test some of them. I came
        up with a very simple variation for Nuts:

        1. At game start, set aside all "hidden" enemy units.

        2. Place markers (can be anything) in any terrain feature that could provide
        a reasonable ambush location. Place more markers than actual units to keep
        things interesting. I went with 2:1 markers to actual units.

        3. To test this, I used a simple but ugly resolution mechanism. I roll 2d6
        at appropriate times (see below) and total them (like craps). A 4 means
        "nothing there". A 10 means "something's there". The odds of either are
        something like 8-9%. On a 10, I use a simple randomization of the off-table
        units that might be there to figure out what gets placed. I just rolled 1d6,
        and counted left to right, wrapping around if > than number of units. If
        it's a ground feature, any infantry team is eligible, along with guns and
        tanks, if any. If a bell tower or other confined space, only spotters or
        snipers. If a 2nd level, only infantry teams.

        4. As I move my (the player) teams, whenever my figures come in view of a
        marker, I take a test. If it comes up "something's there", I randomize and
        place the unit. Then I do the normal Nuts In-Sight checks as if that team
        had been there the entire time.

        5. On the enemy (non-player) activation, I simply go through each remaining
        marker doing tests and placing the enemy teams or removing markers.

        On my initial test, this worked surprisingly well. I had a German squad
        advancing on a Soviet village. Four Soviet units were held off table:

        2 X Infantry squad with 1 REP 5 SMG and 4 REP 4 bolt action rifles each.
        2 X LMG team with 1 REP 4 gunner and 1 REP 3 assistant each.

        The German squad consisted of:
        1 X NCO REP 5 with SMG
        1 X Jr. NCO REP 5 with SMG
        1 X LMG REP 4
        2 X bolt action rifle REP 4
        1 X bolt action rifle REP 3

        On turn 1, the German NCO advanced to the edge of some woods near the edge
        of the village and "peeked" out. This triggered a few tests in the town,
        with one coming up 10 for "something there". The random roll identified an
        LMG team, so I lifted the marker and replaced it with an LMG team. I then
        took In-Sight tests for both sides, just as if the LMG had been there the
        whole time. The German NCO won, and being out of SMG range, elected to duck
        back into the woods. So far, so good. The NCO had "spotted" the ambush, and
        elected to play stealthy.

        As the German player, I now had a difficult choice. To avoid that LMG, I had
        to shift to one flank and try to advance to some woods adjacent to the LMG
        building, but two turns away. Doing so would expose my squad to possible
        fire from additional markers, but the LMG (now in overwatch) was simply too
        well positioned in cover to take on directly. I elected to have the squad
        fast-move out of view of the LMG. As they moved out, I rolled tests for the
        new markers that had view of their exposed positions. None revealed
        anything, so my squad moved out, finally reaching the far woods after 2
        turns of fast-move, and removing a marker from the woods once they touched
        it.

        The Germans collected in the woods and prepared to assault the LMG building
        from the side. As they burst out of the woods (moving as a group), tests
        were triggered from a couple markers on their flank. One revealed a rifle
        team, and a quick exchange of fire resulted in my squad ducking back into
        the woods, aborting the assault. The Soviets had apparently been using the
        LMG as bait, allowing my squad to move into exposed positions before firing.
        Fortunately, my men all made it back to cover unharmed.

        My men regrouped, and managed to pull off the assault against the LMG
        building and eventually clearing the village. One more Soviet LMG was
        revealed, but was ineffective.

        I was very pleased with the degree of interest this added. The 2nd ambush
        was a pleasant (to me, not my squad) surprise. At game end, 3 of 4 ambushing
        units had deployed, and only 1 marker remained. 10% odds of either removing
        the marker, or placing a unit each test seems to be close to right, keeping
        it interesting without being overpowering.

        Having everybody in ambush works against the defenders since they are
        outnumbered at the start, and reinforcements only trickle in. I think next
        time, I'll give the enemy at least a squad on-table to anchor the defense a
        bit more.

        Thanks everybody for the great ideas. I still intend to pursue the
        "escalating" approach, using Mythic or something similar, but this was a
        good test of the basic mechanics.

        - Bob


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      • ewingjohn60
        What if the dice are not a 4 or a 10? Cool mechanism for adding suprise to the mix!
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 9, 2008
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          What if the dice are not a 4 or a 10? Cool
          mechanism for adding suprise to the mix!
        • Bob George
          ... I was really out to test the ambush parts, but yes, there are some fun things you can do. I m thinking the 2d6 poor man s version could be: All 5 or 6, yes
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 10, 2008
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            On Thu, Apr 10, 2008 at 12:24 AM, ewingjohn60 <ewingjohn60@...> wrote:

            > What if the dice are not a 4 or a 10? Cool
            > mechanism for adding suprise to the mix!


            I was really out to test the ambush parts, but yes, there are some fun
            things you can do. I'm thinking the 2d6 poor man's version could be:

            All 5 or 6, yes (5,5 5,6 6,5)
            All 6, big yes (6, 6)
            All 1 or 2, no (2, 2 2,1 1,2)
            All 1, big no (1, 1)
            Total 7, something unexpected happens (random event card, etc.)

            (Mythic GME is only about $8, so you don't need to go broke getting ahold of
            the real deal if you want even more flexibility.)

            Way beyond what I needed for my ambush tests though, but something I'm going
            to tinker with.

            - Bob


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