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Re: Solo Skirmish Rules [was: hello reply on markers]

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  • Dale
    ... As this was recommended by two others, it might be useful to explain _why_ these rules would be suitable for _solo_ skirmishes, as opposed to simply being
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
      --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "David & Robin" <gpfarm@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Chain Reaction 2.0 from Two Hour Wargames works very well solo. It
      > is a very flexible system and should do your era with no problem.

      As this was recommended by two others, it might be useful to explain
      _why_ these rules would be suitable for _solo_ skirmishes, as opposed
      to simply being good skirmish rules.

      Most rules from Two Hours Wargames use a reaction system whereby when
      Side A performs certain actions, it triggers a reaction by forces on
      Side B. Essentially, you start to lose control over your troops
      (sometimes partial, sometimes completely) and they perform based upon
      the rolls against the various reactions tables. This alone makes it
      great for solo play.

      In addition, most rules _also_ include a campaign system in which the
      other side is randomly determined, as is the context of each
      skirmish. This gives you continuity between your battles and allows
      your troops to come to life (if you like that sort of thing), as you
      have a sort of combat history with each of the figures. Think of the
      old U.S. TV series "Combat" (with Vic Morrow) or "Rat Patrol" and you
      have a pretty good idea of what they are shooting for.

      There are a lot of products in the Chain Reaction "family"; each one
      essentially provides the same rules, but has a different campaign
      system appropriate to the period it covers. "Chain Reaction" covers
      the period you want, but the campaign system is very generic. "Nuts!"
      covers late-war WW II (especially the Americans), "FNG" covers
      Vietnam, "Black Powder Battles" covers Napoleonics and French &
      Indian Wars, etc. Unfortunately, there is no ruleset in the family
      which specifically covers the late 19th century or WW I, so you will
      have to use the "Chain Reaction" campaign system to devise your own.

      By the way, the rules are supported by a VERY active Yahoo group
      (search for "twohourwargames") to answer all of your questions and
      which has all of the free updates.

      Dale
    • STEPHEN BANKHEAD
      Just to add a slightly discordant note re CR 2.0, if it plays in a similar manner to FNG, I d keep the figure numbers low, as you will need to track the status
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
        Just to add a slightly discordant note re CR 2.0, if it plays in a similar manner to FNG, I'd keep the figure numbers low, as you will need to track the status of each individual ie their rep, who fired at who for spotting and reaction tests. I play tested FNG with the group I usually play Charlie Company with and their concensus was to junk the rules and go back to CC. In FNG's defence I would say that the Vietnam chrome is an excellent reason to buy the rules, but I wouldn't have bought them for the rules alone.

        Stephen

        Dale <code_ronin@...> wrote:
        --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "David & Robin" <gpfarm@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Chain Reaction 2.0 from Two Hour Wargames works very well solo. It
        > is a very flexible system and should do your era with no problem.

        As this was recommended by two others, it might be useful to explain
        _why_ these rules would be suitable for _solo_ skirmishes, as opposed
        to simply being good skirmish rules.

        Most rules from Two Hours Wargames use a reaction system whereby when
        Side A performs certain actions, it triggers a reaction by forces on
        Side B. Essentially, you start to lose control over your troops
        (sometimes partial, sometimes completely) and they perform based upon
        the rolls against the various reactions tables. This alone makes it
        great for solo play.

        In addition, most rules _also_ include a campaign system in which the
        other side is randomly determined, as is the context of each
        skirmish. This gives you continuity between your battles and allows
        your troops to come to life (if you like that sort of thing), as you
        have a sort of combat history with each of the figures. Think of the
        old U.S. TV series "Combat" (with Vic Morrow) or "Rat Patrol" and you
        have a pretty good idea of what they are shooting for.

        There are a lot of products in the Chain Reaction "family"; each one
        essentially provides the same rules, but has a different campaign
        system appropriate to the period it covers. "Chain Reaction" covers
        the period you want, but the campaign system is very generic. "Nuts!"
        covers late-war WW II (especially the Americans), "FNG" covers
        Vietnam, "Black Powder Battles" covers Napoleonics and French &
        Indian Wars, etc. Unfortunately, there is no ruleset in the family
        which specifically covers the late 19th century or WW I, so you will
        have to use the "Chain Reaction" campaign system to devise your own.

        By the way, the rules are supported by a VERY active Yahoo group
        (search for "twohourwargames") to answer all of your questions and
        which has all of the free updates.

        Dale






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Andy Cowell
        In message , STEPHEN BA ... I m not very experienced with CR, but it seems geared for about 10 players
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
          In message <20060802143651.78509.qmail@...>, STEPHEN BA
          NKHEAD writes:
          > Just to add a slightly discordant note re CR 2.0, if it plays in a
          > similar manner to FNG, I'd keep the figure numbers low, as you will
          > need to track the status of each individual ie their rep, who fired at
          > who for spotting and reaction tests.

          I'm not very experienced with CR, but it seems geared for about 10
          players per side. I've heard that NUTS!, the WW2 supplement, is geared
          towards more figures, but I've never played it.
        • Dale
          ... It does... ... True, about 10 per player until you get used to the rules, then about 20 each, I think is what they usually quote on the Yahoo group. ...
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 2, 2006
            --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, STEPHEN BANKHEAD
            <Stephen.Bankhead@...> wrote:
            >
            > Just to add a slightly discordant note re CR 2.0, if it plays in a
            > similar manner to FNG,

            It does...

            > I'd keep the figure numbers low,

            True, about 10 per player until you get used to the rules, then about
            20 each, I think is what they usually quote on the Yahoo group.

            > as you will need to track the status of each individual ie their
            > rep,

            That part is kind of easy, as you can use stickers, colored dots,
            etc. that provide the value at a glance.

            > who fired at who for spotting and reaction tests.

            I used to read the Yahoo group a lot and I can tell you that the
            spotting and reaction rules are probably the most misunderstood
            section of the rules. The reason is simple: you have a tendency to
            read too much into the rules. I sure did.

            I would suggest that if you want to give it another shot, try the
            Yahoo group and read through a couple of threads thay talk about
            reaction checks (there are only about a bazillion). You'll hit the
            AHA! moment.

            Of course, that doesn't mean you'll like the rules afterwards, but
            believe me, most people don't get the rules "right" the first time
            because they think things should be more complex than they really are.

            Just my $0.02.

            Dale
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