Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Another new guy

Expand Messages
  • Patrick Carroll
    Hey, everybody. Just joined the group. I m a longtime wargamer (started in 1968) and have been through hundreds of board wargames as well as a few computer
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 24, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hey, everybody. Just joined the group.

      I'm a longtime wargamer (started in 1968) and have been through
      hundreds of board wargames as well as a few computer games. Somehow
      I never managed to get into miniatures, though I've collected a bunch
      of miniatures rules and periodically think about doing something with
      them.

      My wargaming hobby led me to an interest in military history years
      ago, so I read a fair amount. My favorite period, generally
      speaking, is the black-powder (horse-and-musket) era, roughly 1600-
      1900. I'm especially fond of the period 1850-1900, the ACW in
      particular (but also the Colonial Wars).

      Right now, I'm looking for a way to start enjoying solo wargaming
      again. I find I no longer enjoy traditional board wargames (too big
      or complicated; too much setup time; too many units to move each
      turn; too time- or space-consuming). Last time I was into it was
      about 1994, when I was an ASL fanatic; but one day I decided I no
      longer had the patience for all those complicated rules, so I dropped
      it like a hot potato and never looked back.

      When the home-computer age arrived, I was really into PC games for a
      long while--and still am, when I can find a good one. But I find
      that the best computer games are not wargames. And the few good
      computer wargames I've seen aren't very good solo games, because the
      AI sucks. A big downside to computer games is the lack of
      documentation (along with complex algorithms): as a player, I never
      get to know exactly why things are happening the way they are.
      Another problem is that wargame designers figure they can make
      computer games *huge,* since the computer takes care of all the
      tedious tasks. I don't like huge games. For my taste, the smaller,
      the better.

      One thing I tried was DBA. That game is just the right size, pace,
      and game length for me, and it has been "house ruled" to cover all
      periods of history (and fantasy and sci-fi too). So, I made some
      game pieces out of foam board just to try the rules out. I found the
      game is pretty close to what I'm looking for, but not quite there.
      It needs just a bit more complexity (e.g., unit quality--green,
      average, elite), for one thing. And unfortunately it doesn't seem to
      lend itself all that well to other periods besides ancient/medieval.

      The worst thing about DBA, to me, is that it requires miniatures.
      You *can* play it with just painted bases (which is all I've ever
      done so far)--but when you do that, the game doesn't really have
      enough to it to engage your imagination.

      I tried to get into miniatures years ago, but after spending a few
      hundred dollars and immersing myself in it for about three weeks, I
      realized I really *hate* painting and modeling! I'd have to buy my
      figures pre-painted. And I can't see doing that, since it'd be
      expensive and I don't really like the look of miniatures all that
      much anyhow.

      Another thing I did was buy the Hasbro game "Battle Cry." It's a
      blend of board game and miniatures, and it's not a bad game really.
      Sure lacks realism, though. Somewhere on the Internet, I found a
      solo variant for it. But I lost interest in the game before I tried
      that.

      Around that time, I tried the "Dixie" card game. It's surprisingly
      good, though it sometimes requires a stretch of imagination. I don't
      like the idea of collectible card games, though--and it's a little
      awkward to play solo.

      On the computer, I used to enjoy "Age of Rifles." It fits my
      favorite period, and it's a decent game. However, I found myself
      playing only the smallest scenarios over and over again. The same
      happened with "Panzer General," "Steel Panthers: World at War," and
      other games. I just don't have the patience for even a medium-sized
      game anymore. Only tiny scenarios will do.

      Because of that, I was big into skirmish games for a while.
      Surprisingly, even some of those are too big; but most of 'em are
      small enough to suit me. The downside, as I discovered, is that when
      you get into the nitty-gritty of man-to-man combat, the rules can get
      *very* detailed--annoyingly so. I don't want to roll dice to
      determine whether a sword strike hit a man's upper arm or forearm,
      then roll again to determine how deep the cut was. Also, skirmish
      games seem to go in slow motion.

      That's why I turned to DBA. At least in DBA, the elements represent
      a sizable body of soldiers; so it's a game about warfare, not just a
      game about individual fighting.

      Besides DBA, I've downloaded the "AlienStar" rules--which some say
      are better than DBA. Haven't tried them yet. Once again, I'm put
      off a little by the fact that they're designed for use with
      miniatures, and I really don't want to get into miniatures.

      The very latest thing I've done is buy "Tin Soldiers: Alexander the
      Great" (Matrix Games). So far I've played it only once, but it looks
      very much like a computer version of DBA. The AI seems to be halfway
      decent, so I may be playing this game for a while. If it really
      grabs me, I may someday break down and really get into DBA after all.

      Sorry for the long introduction. I get verbose sometimes.

      --Patrick
    • patzermeister
      Hello Patrick, I m a lurker with the exception of this email I ve been quite. My question to you is have you ever thought of using paper soldiers? Tomo Indy
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 24, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Patrick,

        I'm a lurker with the exception of this email I've been quite. My
        question to you is have you ever thought of using paper soldiers?

        Tomo
        Indy

        --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Carroll"
        <patrick55carroll@...> wrote:
        >
        > I tried to get into miniatures years ago, but after spending a few
        > hundred dollars and immersing myself in it for about three weeks, I
        > realized I really *hate* painting and modeling!
        > Sorry for the long introduction. I get verbose sometimes.
        >
        > --Patrick
        >
      • thedrake70458
        Hi Patrick, Welcome to the group. One suggestion is to look at the folder in the Links section for solo gaming.It is a list of links to solo gaming sites I
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 24, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Patrick,

          Welcome to the group.

          One suggestion is to look at the folder in the Links section for
          solo gaming.It is a list of links to solo gaming sites I have found
          on the web that are great in generating ideas for solo play.IIRC
          there is a link in there for solo DBA.

          Also second the suggestion for Two Hour Wargames,so check them out
          as well.

          Last there is magweb.com for back issues of Lone Warrior
          magazine,which is aimed at solo waragmers (published by Solo
          Wargamers Association);one week is @ $10 USD for a week.

          Hope you like the group.

          Mark
        • Patrick Carroll
          ... You mean cardboard miniatures to avoid having to paint figures? I ve looked at em on the Web, but I wasn t impressed. The ones I saw looked cartoonish.
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 24, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "patzermeister" <cyber_tomo@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Hello Patrick,
            >
            > I'm a lurker with the exception of this email I've been quite. My
            > question to you is have you ever thought of using paper soldiers?

            You mean cardboard "miniatures" to avoid having to paint figures?

            I've looked at 'em on the Web, but I wasn't impressed. The ones I
            saw looked cartoonish. I don't like the look of miniatures that
            much in the first place; I *hate* it when people give them a
            cartoonish look.

            War is serious business, after all. Sure, we wargamers "play" at
            it. But whether it's military history or modern war--or even future
            war--it's a matter of life or death to those involved, with the fate
            of nations hanging in the balance. So, I like my wargames to have a
            pretty serious look to them.

            As an old boardgamer, I'm happy with an abstract look. I don't mind
            cardboard unit-counters and hex-grid maps. They usually do have a
            serious enough look and feel to them for my liking.

            The only reasons I've ever been attracted to miniatures are:

            1. I like the idea of being able to re-create *any* engagement from
            a given period, with just one set of rules. I used to hate buying a
            wargame on, say, the battle of Gettysburg--because all you can ever
            do with it is refight Gettysburg. Over and over again. You don't
            get to wargame any of the hundreds of other ACW battles. But with
            ACW miniatures, something like "Fire & Fury" allows you to refight
            *all* the ACW battles.

            2. I used to get sick of paper and cardboard. I like the look and
            feel of a chess set, where the pieces have some weight to them.
            Board wargames look cheap in comparison--a paper map and flat little
            cardboard pieces. When miniatures are done well, the game pieces
            end up being weighty and substantial, like nice chess pieces.

            But--if I could find a set of rules I like (suitable for solo play),
            I'd find a way to make my own game pieces, I guess. I might use
            cardboard for a while, till I could think of something better. The
            components of the game don't matter to me as much as the rules. It
            mainly has to be a fun and fairly realistic game--with some pre-made
            scenarios, but open-ended enough that there's no end to the
            possibilities.

            --Patrick
          • Jon Oldham
            Hi Patrick, Will s Site at http://www.wjohnson.freeuk.com/ has some counters for use with DBA. and there is another site for which I cant remember the url. But
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 24, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Patrick,

              Will's Site at http://www.wjohnson.freeuk.com/ has some counters for use with DBA. and there is another site for which I cant remember the url. But the other site I believe has DBA counters for sale while the ones on will's site are free. For rules, check out
              http://www.freewargamesrules.co.uk/ they have some DBA varients for the American Civil as well as other periods. If you're interested in 3-D paper Miniatures for use with the games check out http://www.juniorgeneral.org

              Hope this helps,

              Jon Oldham

              Patrick Carroll <patrick55carroll@...> wrote:
              speaking, is the black-powder (horse-and-musket) era, roughly 1600-
              1900.

              One thing I tried was DBA. That game is just the right SPONSORED LINKS
              Solo 9500 battery Solo s2 Solo 5300 battery Solo 9100 battery Hotel solo Gateway solo

              ---------------------------------
              YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


              Visit your group "SoloWarGame" on the web.

              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              SoloWarGame-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              ---------------------------------





              ---------------------------------
              Yahoo! Mail
              Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ken Blackley
              Have you tried DBM? It is like DBA but with more chrome. Ken Blackley Ken Blackley s Medieval Wargames Page http://members.shaw.ca/kblackley/ You thought the
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 25, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Have you tried DBM? It is like DBA but with more chrome.

                Ken Blackley
                Ken Blackley's Medieval Wargames Page
                http://members.shaw.ca/kblackley/

                "You thought the leaden winter would bring you down forever,
                But you rode upon a steamer to the violence of the sun."

                -Clapton/Sharp
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Patrick Carroll" <patrick55carroll@...>
                To: <SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 9:04 AM
                Subject: [SoloWarGame] Another new guy


                > Hey, everybody. Just joined the group.
                >
                > I'm a longtime wargamer (started in 1968) and have been through
                > hundreds of board wargames as well as a few computer games. Somehow
                > I never managed to get into miniatures, though I've collected a bunch
                > of miniatures rules and periodically think about doing something with
                > them.
                >
                > My wargaming hobby led me to an interest in military history years
                > ago, so I read a fair amount. My favorite period, generally
                > speaking, is the black-powder (horse-and-musket) era, roughly 1600-
                > 1900. I'm especially fond of the period 1850-1900, the ACW in
                > particular (but also the Colonial Wars).
                >
                > Right now, I'm looking for a way to start enjoying solo wargaming
                > again. I find I no longer enjoy traditional board wargames (too big
                > or complicated; too much setup time; too many units to move each
                > turn; too time- or space-consuming). Last time I was into it was
                > about 1994, when I was an ASL fanatic; but one day I decided I no
                > longer had the patience for all those complicated rules, so I dropped
                > it like a hot potato and never looked back.
                >
                > When the home-computer age arrived, I was really into PC games for a
                > long while--and still am, when I can find a good one. But I find
                > that the best computer games are not wargames. And the few good
                > computer wargames I've seen aren't very good solo games, because the
                > AI sucks. A big downside to computer games is the lack of
                > documentation (along with complex algorithms): as a player, I never
                > get to know exactly why things are happening the way they are.
                > Another problem is that wargame designers figure they can make
                > computer games *huge,* since the computer takes care of all the
                > tedious tasks. I don't like huge games. For my taste, the smaller,
                > the better.
                >
                > One thing I tried was DBA. That game is just the right size, pace,
                > and game length for me, and it has been "house ruled" to cover all
                > periods of history (and fantasy and sci-fi too). So, I made some
                > game pieces out of foam board just to try the rules out. I found the
                > game is pretty close to what I'm looking for, but not quite there.
                > It needs just a bit more complexity (e.g., unit quality--green,
                > average, elite), for one thing. And unfortunately it doesn't seem to
                > lend itself all that well to other periods besides ancient/medieval.
                >
                > The worst thing about DBA, to me, is that it requires miniatures.
                > You *can* play it with just painted bases (which is all I've ever
                > done so far)--but when you do that, the game doesn't really have
                > enough to it to engage your imagination.
                >
                > I tried to get into miniatures years ago, but after spending a few
                > hundred dollars and immersing myself in it for about three weeks, I
                > realized I really *hate* painting and modeling! I'd have to buy my
                > figures pre-painted. And I can't see doing that, since it'd be
                > expensive and I don't really like the look of miniatures all that
                > much anyhow.
                >
                > Another thing I did was buy the Hasbro game "Battle Cry." It's a
                > blend of board game and miniatures, and it's not a bad game really.
                > Sure lacks realism, though. Somewhere on the Internet, I found a
                > solo variant for it. But I lost interest in the game before I tried
                > that.
                >
                > Around that time, I tried the "Dixie" card game. It's surprisingly
                > good, though it sometimes requires a stretch of imagination. I don't
                > like the idea of collectible card games, though--and it's a little
                > awkward to play solo.
                >
                > On the computer, I used to enjoy "Age of Rifles." It fits my
                > favorite period, and it's a decent game. However, I found myself
                > playing only the smallest scenarios over and over again. The same
                > happened with "Panzer General," "Steel Panthers: World at War," and
                > other games. I just don't have the patience for even a medium-sized
                > game anymore. Only tiny scenarios will do.
                >
                > Because of that, I was big into skirmish games for a while.
                > Surprisingly, even some of those are too big; but most of 'em are
                > small enough to suit me. The downside, as I discovered, is that when
                > you get into the nitty-gritty of man-to-man combat, the rules can get
                > *very* detailed--annoyingly so. I don't want to roll dice to
                > determine whether a sword strike hit a man's upper arm or forearm,
                > then roll again to determine how deep the cut was. Also, skirmish
                > games seem to go in slow motion.
                >
                > That's why I turned to DBA. At least in DBA, the elements represent
                > a sizable body of soldiers; so it's a game about warfare, not just a
                > game about individual fighting.
                >
                > Besides DBA, I've downloaded the "AlienStar" rules--which some say
                > are better than DBA. Haven't tried them yet. Once again, I'm put
                > off a little by the fact that they're designed for use with
                > miniatures, and I really don't want to get into miniatures.
                >
                > The very latest thing I've done is buy "Tin Soldiers: Alexander the
                > Great" (Matrix Games). So far I've played it only once, but it looks
                > very much like a computer version of DBA. The AI seems to be halfway
                > decent, so I may be playing this game for a while. If it really
                > grabs me, I may someday break down and really get into DBA after all.
                >
                > Sorry for the long introduction. I get verbose sometimes.
                >
                > --Patrick
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Community email addresses:
                > Post message: SoloWarGame@onelist.com
                > Subscribe: SoloWarGame-subscribe@onelist.com
                > Unsubscribe: SoloWarGame-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                > List owner: SoloWarGame-owner@onelist.com
                >
                > Shortcut URL to this page:
                > http://www.onelist.com/community/SoloWarGame
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > No virus found in this incoming message.
                > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                > Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 268.1.0/269 - Release Date: 24/02/2006
                >
              • william butler
                ... for a less complex set of horse and musket rules you might try volley and bayonet. more information at
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 26, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Carroll"
                  <patrick55carroll@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hey, everybody. Just joined the group.
                  >
                  > I'm a longtime wargamer (started in 1968) and have been through
                  > hundreds of board wargames as well as a few computer games. Somehow
                  > I never managed to get into miniatures, though I've collected a bunch
                  > of miniatures rules and periodically think about doing something with
                  > them.
                  >
                  > My wargaming hobby led me to an interest in military history years
                  > ago, so I read a fair amount. My favorite period, generally
                  > speaking, is the black-powder (horse-and-musket) era, roughly 1600-
                  > 1900. I'm especially fond of the period 1850-1900, the ACW in
                  > particular (but also the Colonial Wars).
                  >
                  > Right now, I'm looking for a way to start enjoying solo wargaming
                  > again. I find I no longer enjoy traditional board wargames (too big
                  > or complicated; too much setup time; too many units to move each
                  > turn; too time- or space-consuming). Last time I was into it was
                  > about 1994, when I was an ASL fanatic; but one day I decided I no
                  > longer had the patience for all those complicated rules, so I dropped
                  > it like a hot potato and never looked back.
                  >
                  > When the home-computer age arrived, I was really into PC games for a
                  > long while--and still am, when I can find a good one. But I find
                  > that the best computer games are not wargames. And the few good
                  > computer wargames I've seen aren't very good solo games, because the
                  > AI sucks. A big downside to computer games is the lack of
                  > documentation (along with complex algorithms): as a player, I never
                  > get to know exactly why things are happening the way they are.
                  > Another problem is that wargame designers figure they can make
                  > computer games *huge,* since the computer takes care of all the
                  > tedious tasks. I don't like huge games. For my taste, the smaller,
                  > the better.
                  >
                  > One thing I tried was DBA. That game is just the right size, pace,
                  > and game length for me, and it has been "house ruled" to cover all
                  > periods of history (and fantasy and sci-fi too). So, I made some
                  > game pieces out of foam board just to try the rules out. I found the
                  > game is pretty close to what I'm looking for, but not quite there.
                  > It needs just a bit more complexity (e.g., unit quality--green,
                  > average, elite), for one thing. And unfortunately it doesn't seem to
                  > lend itself all that well to other periods besides ancient/medieval.
                  >
                  > The worst thing about DBA, to me, is that it requires miniatures.
                  > You *can* play it with just painted bases (which is all I've ever
                  > done so far)--but when you do that, the game doesn't really have
                  > enough to it to engage your imagination.
                  >
                  > I tried to get into miniatures years ago, but after spending a few
                  > hundred dollars and immersing myself in it for about three weeks, I
                  > realized I really *hate* painting and modeling! I'd have to buy my
                  > figures pre-painted. And I can't see doing that, since it'd be
                  > expensive and I don't really like the look of miniatures all that
                  > much anyhow.
                  >
                  > Another thing I did was buy the Hasbro game "Battle Cry." It's a
                  > blend of board game and miniatures, and it's not a bad game really.
                  > Sure lacks realism, though. Somewhere on the Internet, I found a
                  > solo variant for it. But I lost interest in the game before I tried
                  > that.
                  >
                  > Around that time, I tried the "Dixie" card game. It's surprisingly
                  > good, though it sometimes requires a stretch of imagination. I don't
                  > like the idea of collectible card games, though--and it's a little
                  > awkward to play solo.
                  >
                  > On the computer, I used to enjoy "Age of Rifles." It fits my
                  > favorite period, and it's a decent game. However, I found myself
                  > playing only the smallest scenarios over and over again. The same
                  > happened with "Panzer General," "Steel Panthers: World at War," and
                  > other games. I just don't have the patience for even a medium-sized
                  > game anymore. Only tiny scenarios will do.
                  >
                  > Because of that, I was big into skirmish games for a while.
                  > Surprisingly, even some of those are too big; but most of 'em are
                  > small enough to suit me. The downside, as I discovered, is that when
                  > you get into the nitty-gritty of man-to-man combat, the rules can get
                  > *very* detailed--annoyingly so. I don't want to roll dice to
                  > determine whether a sword strike hit a man's upper arm or forearm,
                  > then roll again to determine how deep the cut was. Also, skirmish
                  > games seem to go in slow motion.
                  >
                  > That's why I turned to DBA. At least in DBA, the elements represent
                  > a sizable body of soldiers; so it's a game about warfare, not just a
                  > game about individual fighting.
                  >
                  > Besides DBA, I've downloaded the "AlienStar" rules--which some say
                  > are better than DBA. Haven't tried them yet. Once again, I'm put
                  > off a little by the fact that they're designed for use with
                  > miniatures, and I really don't want to get into miniatures.
                  >
                  > The very latest thing I've done is buy "Tin Soldiers: Alexander the
                  > Great" (Matrix Games). So far I've played it only once, but it looks
                  > very much like a computer version of DBA. The AI seems to be halfway
                  > decent, so I may be playing this game for a while. If it really
                  > grabs me, I may someday break down and really get into DBA after all.
                  >
                  > Sorry for the long introduction. I get verbose sometimes.
                  >
                  > --Patrick
                  >

                  for a less complex set of horse and musket rules you might try volley
                  and bayonet. more information at
                  http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/vnblist/?yguid=161551030
                  for something similar to dba, but with more chrome you might be
                  interested in stratego. the first edition is sold out, but the second
                  edition is now available. there is a computer version for the first
                  edition that you can play solo or with others either over the internet
                  or on the same computer. more information at
                  http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/Strategos_rules/?yguid=161551030
                • Patrick Carroll
                  ... I haven t actually seen DBM (or DBR), but I ve heard a lot about it. The reasons I haven t bought a copy are: 1. I m not really into ancients per se.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 26, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, Ken Blackley <kblackley@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Have you tried DBM? It is like DBA but with more chrome.

                    I haven't actually seen DBM (or DBR), but I've heard a lot about
                    it. The reasons I haven't bought a copy are:

                    1. I'm not really into ancients per se. One think I especially
                    like about DBA is that it has been house-ruled for all periods
                    (e.g., the Humberside variant takes it up to the year 1900).

                    2. I like the two-foot-square table that DBA uses, and the limit of
                    twelve elements. Though artificial, they keep the game compact.
                    After all, I'm an old board wargamer; I'm used to things fitting on
                    a card table.

                    I've looked into Phil Barker's "Horse, Foot, and Guns"--but it looks
                    like he's making it a bigger game than I like, getting away from the
                    elegant simplicity of DBA.

                    A UK company, AlienStar, publishes an alternative to DBA which
                    covers most all periods. I downloaded one set of rules ("Into Glory
                    Ride"), but I haven't tried 'em yet. They look fairly promising,
                    though the copy I downloaded a couple years ago is obviously
                    incomplete.

                    I'm afraid most of my difficulty is psychological. It's not that
                    there aren't plenty of good games & rules out there; it's just that
                    I can't seem to make up my mind what I really want to do.

                    What I *think* I'd like is a wargame that's about as easy to set up
                    and play as a game of solitaire (patience--the card game), yet which
                    has enough "chrome" to engage the imagination--*and* which is
                    realistic enough to actually be educational (i.e., teach a little
                    something about military history/art/science). But I don't want to
                    have to design the game myself, and I'm not crazy about making
                    components for it either. I just want to play it--to pass the time
                    and amuse myself, as I might with a game of solitaire.

                    That's what I *think* I'd like. If I had such a thing, chances are
                    I'd find something wrong with it--and then I'd start wanting
                    something different.

                    Kinda sucks, not knowing your own mind. :(

                    But thanks, everybody, for all the links and tips! I'll follow up
                    on some of 'em.

                    --Patrick
                  • Sven Norén
                    ... dropped ... the ... to ... May I suggest you try Ancients? It is a classic counters-on-a-map wargame, which you seem to like, and it is suitable for small
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 1 2:05 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Carroll"
                      <patrick55carroll@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Right now, I'm looking for a way to start enjoying solo wargaming
                      > again. I find I no longer enjoy traditional board wargames (too big
                      > or complicated; too much setup time; too many units to move each
                      > turn; too time- or space-consuming). Last time I was into it was
                      > about 1994, when I was an ASL fanatic; but one day I decided I no
                      > longer had the patience for all those complicated rules, so I
                      dropped
                      > it like a hot potato and never looked back.
                      > . . .
                      > One thing I tried was DBA. That game is just the right size, pace,
                      > and game length for me, and it has been "house ruled" to cover all
                      > periods of history (and fantasy and sci-fi too). So, I made some
                      > game pieces out of foam board just to try the rules out. I found
                      the
                      > game is pretty close to what I'm looking for, but not quite there.
                      > It needs just a bit more complexity (e.g., unit quality--green,
                      > average, elite), for one thing. And unfortunately it doesn't seem
                      to
                      > lend itself all that well to other periods besides ancient/medieval.
                      >
                      > The worst thing about DBA, to me, is that it requires miniatures.
                      > You *can* play it with just painted bases (which is all I've ever
                      > done so far)--but when you do that, the game doesn't really have
                      > enough to it to engage your imagination.

                      May I suggest you try Ancients? It is a classic counters-on-a-map
                      wargame, which you seem to like, and it is suitable for small games.
                      The units are generic, heavy infantry, light infantry, heavy cavalry,
                      light cavalry etcetera, and there was a half dozen maps in the box and
                      32 scenarios. There was also info on how to set up your own scenarios
                      and how to conduct a campaign game.

                      It is sort of DBA but with cardboard counters.

                      Here http://www.relativerange.com/ancients/
                      you can download the game as freeware, or you might try to find the
                      boxed game on eBay.

                      Granted, it is geared to ancient battles, but you might glean enough
                      ideas to convert your favourite ACW boardgame?

                      Happy Gaming,
                      Sven Norén
                    • Patrick Carroll
                      ... games. ... cavalry, ... and ... scenarios ... the ... enough ... Thanks, Sven! I hadn t heard of it, but it looks very promising. Meanwhile, last night I
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 1 4:30 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, Sven Norén <sven_noren@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > May I suggest you try Ancients? It is a classic counters-on-a-map
                        > wargame, which you seem to like, and it is suitable for small
                        games.
                        > The units are generic, heavy infantry, light infantry, heavy
                        cavalry,
                        > light cavalry etcetera, and there was a half dozen maps in the box
                        and
                        > 32 scenarios. There was also info on how to set up your own
                        scenarios
                        > and how to conduct a campaign game.
                        >
                        > It is sort of DBA but with cardboard counters.
                        >
                        > Here http://www.relativerange.com/ancients/
                        > you can download the game as freeware, or you might try to find
                        the
                        > boxed game on eBay.
                        >
                        > Granted, it is geared to ancient battles, but you might glean
                        enough
                        > ideas to convert your favourite ACW boardgame?

                        Thanks, Sven! I hadn't heard of it, but it looks very promising.

                        Meanwhile, last night I noticed a couple games on our downstairs
                        computer that I haven't played in a long time: Steel Panthers:
                        World at War and Battle of Wesnoth. So, I copied them to a CD and
                        ported them upstairs to the computer I play games on.

                        Suddenly I feel I have two brand-new games--and very good ones at
                        that!

                        Amazingly, they're both free.
                        www.wesnoth.org
                        http://www.matrixgames.com/games/downloads.asp?gid=297

                        --Patrick
                      • Bert-Bach-A-Rat
                        These rules are wonderful for solo-designed for solo I should say-join the group: http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/twohourwargames/?yguid=206596292 Go the
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 10 8:42 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          These rules are wonderful for solo-designed for solo I should say-join
                          the group:
                          http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/twohourwargames/?yguid=206596292

                          Go the home page: http://www.angelfire.com/az3/twohourwargames/index.htm


                          --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Carroll"
                          <patrick55carroll@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In SoloWarGame@yahoogroups.com, "patzermeister" <cyber_tomo@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hello Patrick,
                          > >
                          > > I'm a lurker with the exception of this email I've been quite. My
                          > > question to you is have you ever thought of using paper soldiers?
                          >
                          > You mean cardboard "miniatures" to avoid having to paint figures?
                          >
                          > I've looked at 'em on the Web, but I wasn't impressed. The ones I
                          > saw looked cartoonish. I don't like the look of miniatures that
                          > much in the first place; I *hate* it when people give them a
                          > cartoonish look.
                          >
                          > War is serious business, after all. Sure, we wargamers "play" at
                          > it. But whether it's military history or modern war--or even future
                          > war--it's a matter of life or death to those involved, with the fate
                          > of nations hanging in the balance. So, I like my wargames to have a
                          > pretty serious look to them.
                          >
                          > As an old boardgamer, I'm happy with an abstract look. I don't mind
                          > cardboard unit-counters and hex-grid maps. They usually do have a
                          > serious enough look and feel to them for my liking.
                          >
                          > The only reasons I've ever been attracted to miniatures are:
                          >
                          > 1. I like the idea of being able to re-create *any* engagement from
                          > a given period, with just one set of rules. I used to hate buying a
                          > wargame on, say, the battle of Gettysburg--because all you can ever
                          > do with it is refight Gettysburg. Over and over again. You don't
                          > get to wargame any of the hundreds of other ACW battles. But with
                          > ACW miniatures, something like "Fire & Fury" allows you to refight
                          > *all* the ACW battles.
                          >
                          > 2. I used to get sick of paper and cardboard. I like the look and
                          > feel of a chess set, where the pieces have some weight to them.
                          > Board wargames look cheap in comparison--a paper map and flat little
                          > cardboard pieces. When miniatures are done well, the game pieces
                          > end up being weighty and substantial, like nice chess pieces.
                          >
                          > But--if I could find a set of rules I like (suitable for solo play),
                          > I'd find a way to make my own game pieces, I guess. I might use
                          > cardboard for a while, till I could think of something better. The
                          > components of the game don't matter to me as much as the rules. It
                          > mainly has to be a fun and fairly realistic game--with some pre-made
                          > scenarios, but open-ended enough that there's no end to the
                          > possibilities.
                          >
                          > --Patrick
                          >
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.