Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[SGI] Re: Master disciple /Ryuei/safwan

Expand Messages
  • Robin Beck
    ... me some ShoShu materials that claimed Shakyamuni wasn t fully enlightened, or something like that. They used the Mai ji sa ze nen, I ga ryo shujo, Toku
    Message 1 of 326 , Mar 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, Stace Near
      <dorrje_2003@...> wrote:
      >
      > <<<<<<<I don't at all buy the slander that Nichiren Shoshu doesn't
      > > recognize the Buddha, you can find that allegation sprinkled all over
      > > the Internet, but judging by their own materials they recognize both
      > > him and his major teachings. A little searching would make that
      > > obvious.
      > >
      > > Jim
      > ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~
      > They have certainly changed their tune. I could, at one time, find
      > numerous quotations from them that were derogatory about Shakyamuni.
      > I can not now. IIRC; they still see Nichiren as "The Buddha" and
      > superior to Shakyamuni.
      >
      > robin>>>>>>>>>
      >
      >
      > Hey all,
      >
      > Years ago when I first heard about NMRK, a Friend of mine brought
      me some ShoShu materials that claimed Shakyamuni wasn't fully
      enlightened, or something like that. They used the Mai ji sa ze nen,
      I ga ryo shujo, Toku nyu mu-jo do, Soku joju busshin, from the Life
      Span chapter to illustrate that the Buddha was saying he didn't know
      how to cause all living beings to enter the Buddha way. I thought
      much the material was non-buddhism as I was reading Zen and Theravada
      at the time.
      >
      > However, I have gone through some of there websites and found some
      good info on chanting. http://www.nst.org/articles/so.txt There are
      some references to topics that are debated(debunked) by persons here,
      but I benefited from the distinction that was made about chanting
      Daimoku as shodai, and chanting as prayer. I've never been that
      comfortable with saying my practice is prayer, I do pray but that is
      not the whole of it.
      >
      > Qoutes:
      >
      > Shodai (chanting of daimoku or Nam-myoho-renge-kyo to the
      > Gohonzon) is the essential practice in Nichiren Shoshu faith.
      > However, most people do the practice of prayer (thinking about what
      > they want or need, instead of concentrating on offering daimoku to
      > the Gohonzon) instead of the original shodai. There is confusion
      > about what is the difference between shodai and prayer. When one
      > chants daimoku to fulfill one's own desire, he/she believes this to be
      > shodai. However, this is nothing but the practice of prayer.
      >
      > When you face the Honmon no Gohonzon of the Three Great
      > Secret Laws', with faith in the Gohonzon, then chant - this is called
      > Honmon no Daimoku. The important thing is this precise moment of
      > ichinen.
      >
      > The Daishonin states in the Gosho, Questions and Answers on
      > Embracing the Lotus Sutra. "Moreover, as life does not go beyond the
      > moment..." (Major Writings, Vol. 5, pg. 34).
      >
      > Life is the accumulation of moment to moment. Whenever you do
      > shodai, for ten minutes (or whatever time), each single moment of
      > shodai is extremely important. Your ichinen2 must be the ichinen of
      > faith.
      >
      >
      >
      > Be Well,
      >
      > Stace
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      I agree that is good advice. I mostly do shodai {mantra chanting} as
      chanting meditation rather than as praying for something I want.

      The kanji for Sho is likely:
      http://www.mahou.org/Kanji/3E27/

      I am not sure what the kani for dai would be.
      Maybe
      http://www.mahou.org/Kanji/426A/

      r
    • Stace Near
      I second this, Thank you, Safwan, for sharing this. It is very inspiring. The post I wrote about mentor/disciple was really about my attempt to understand
      Message 326 of 326 , Mar 2, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I second this, Thank you, Safwan, for sharing this. It is very inspiring. The post I wrote about mentor/disciple was really about my attempt to understand it. Your response has helped, so thank you, again.

        be well,

        Stace

        camoonchild <camoonchild@...> wrote:
        Safwan, that is a really great personal experience of how having a
        buddhist mentor helped you in your job. Thanks for sharing. CMC

        --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "Safwan Zabalawi"
        <gachiriki@...> wrote:
        >
        > I want here to address a combined subject of two posts; one on
        Mentor
        > and the other on Fearlessness, into one example. P Toda said that
        > although Compassion is the basic nature of Boddhisattva, but
        without
        > courage, one cannot be compassionate. Compassion and courage are
        > inseparable.
        >
        > Ikeda also encourages to engage in society and he
        says: "Engagement,
        > however, requires courage. There are all too many cases in which
        > compassion, owing to a lack of courage, remains mere sentiment."
        >
        > About 10 years ago, my job [within a team of about 20 people] - was
        > rather secure and simple. I had no particular problems with work.
        > Then at a certain phase a new manager arrived, and we quickly felt
        > his arrogance and sarcastic bullying, but he was away from me, I
        did
        > not give him a chance to find a fault in my performance. No one was
        > happy, and I was worried about others, who were weaker than him,
        and
        > were suffering greatly from his bullying and putting them down, and
        > they did not know what to do.
        >
        > I encountered a conflict in myself, because I felt the sufferings
        of
        > others but could do nothing. Then I read that guidance about
        > compassion and courage. Without a Mentor explaining to me the
        proper
        > Buddhist behaviour in that local event I was in, I would not have
        > realised what action to take to courageously face arrogance in my
        > environment. (Before Buddhism, I would have shrug my shoulders and
        > not bothered or pretended something, but that was before Buddhism)
        >
        > After chanting, I knew that I must develop first the wisdom in
        > finding reasonable [not just emotional] arguments - when facing
        that
        > arrogant manager. I used work –meetings to speak about various
        > detailed things. My voice, at the beginning, was trembling. I felt
        > that I needed to drink water when I started speaking, my mouth was
        > dry and all that chest electricity...but finally , and on the long
        > run, I could speak out with the administration about the atmosphere
        > at work, and many things later followed and finally the manager
        took
        > a long leave then found another job.
        >
        > Never occurred to me before Buddhism that as a human being, I have
        to
        > manifest compassion through courageous action [even if I was not
        the
        > centre of sufferings].
        >
        > One can read many books, and recite the Lotus Sutra and its
        fantastic
        > metaphors, but without a mentor who would "live the Lotus Sutra" as
        > Nichiren did, or teach it and explain it in terms of humanity and
        > behaviour in the modern world as the 3 founders did, then the whole
        > philosophy of Buddhism would have been mere fantasy.
        >
        > The lotus Sutra points to the Three Properties of BodhisattvaBuddha
        > (Compassion, Action, and Wisdom) in 3 verses in the LifeSpan
        chapter.
        >
        > But just reading the Lotus Sutra without mentors who make it a
        > reality - in the physical world - will not translate its verses
        into
        > beneficial and practical models of human behaviour.
        >
        > This Buddhism is not about reciting `magical verses' or performing
        > religious rituals, it is about behaviour as a human being and
        > inseparability of Person and Law.
        >
        > gachiriki
        >
        >
        > --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "Safwan Zabalawi"
        > <gachiriki@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Steve, that event of taking Ikeda to prison was a manifestation
        of
        > > his taking responsibility to protect the whole organisation, and
        > > taking responsibility requires courage.
        > >
        > > The first period after the war and the disaterous situation ikeda
        > > lived through- however never weakening his strong determination
        is
        > > recorded and acknowledged by living members. To determine never
        to
        > be
        > > defeated no matter what obstacles, even health or survival, this
        is
        > a
        > > spirit based on courage.
        > >
        > > The most outstanding expression of Ikeda's fearlessness is
        standing
        > > against the corrupt authority of priesthood and in particular
        > Nikken.
        > > At that time, Ikeda had already established his life overcoming
        > > health and poverty and could succumb to back-door agreements with
        > > Nikken, but he stood like a lion against hundreds of years of
        > feudal,
        > > arrogant and aggressive demands of priesthood.
        > >
        > > In his own words, he decided to stand alone in the fight against
        > > arrogance, not knowing whether SGI members will support him or
        not.
        > > It happened before that he was betrayed by cowards who sided with
        > the
        > > priesthood in the past.
        > >
        > > The threats made toward Ikeda are too many to count, but he
        > > courageously crashed all attacks on him and on SGI.
        > >
        > > One of the most important features of fearlessness is to speak
        the
        > > truth without compromise and to go into all areas of human
        > activities
        > > not excluding the darkest areas in the world, and which Ikeda
        went
        > to
        > > introduce Buddhism.
        > >
        > > Speaking about Buddhism in the intelectual fields and
        universities
        > > require a solid confidence - in particular because Ikeda has no
        > > formal high education. Ikeda knocked the door inviting to a
        > Buddhist
        > > dialogue and made contact with an astonishing number of THOUSANDS
        > of
        > > people from all over the world and in all endeavours of humanity.
        > He
        > > was not always received with mutual agreements with whom he
        > > courageously made first contact, as it happened with meeting
        Castro
        > > and Suharto when explaining Buddhist view on reality. To have
        > > confidence regardless of other's attitude, agreement or
        > disagreement
        > > and to speak mildly about world peace is a model of human
        behaviour
        > > which Ikeda will be remembered for.
        > >
        > > gachiriki
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "steve_is_a_buddha"
        > > <steve_is_a_buddha@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Safwan
        > > >
        > > > Could you possibly give us some examples of President Ikeda's
        > > > fearlessness - I worry sometimes that sceptics and naysayers
        might
        > > > think that President Ikeda is not particularly fearless, since
        you
        > > > haven't given any examples of his fearlessness.
        > > >
        > > > I remember the night in the cells he had for infringing japanese
        > > > electoral law - that was extremely brave. But do you have any
        > other
        > > > examples?
        > > >
        > > > Thanks
        > > >
        > > > Steve
        > > >
        > > > --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "Safwan Zabalawi"
        > > > <gachiriki@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > SGI Buddhism is based on the principle of Direct Connection
        > > between
        > > > > the individual and the Gohonzon with no one in between. P
        > Ikeda's
        > > > > made this principle a reality and provided a model of
        > > fearlessness,
        > > > > compassion and dedication to the Law.
        > > > >
        > > > > gachiriki
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, ryuei2000
        > > > > <no_reply@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "Safwan
        > Zabalawi"
        > > > > <gachiriki@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > The Dharma is propagated by actions and behaviour, not by
        > > > > > > theoretically reading the Lotus Sutra:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >I am glad that in Nichiren Shu we teach that one
        inherits
        > > the
        > > > > Dharma
        > > > > > > >directly from the rolls of the Lotus Sutra.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Without Nichiren's behaviour, the Lotus Sutra and all its
        > > > > teachings
        > > > > > > were meaningless or non-existent for the masses of
        Ordinary
        > > > > People to
        > > > > > > whom it was meant.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Nichiren pointed directly to the Lotus Sutra and showed us
        > how
        > > to
        > > > > do the same. No
        > > > > > middle-men, no necessary institution.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > And do you really want to say that the Lotus Sutra is
        > > meaningless?
        > > > > Your argument is about
        > > > > > the same as Honen's argument - the very one that Nichiren
        > > himself
        > > > > refuted.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Nichiren's example was to directly go to the Lotus Sutra,
        and
        > > his
        > > > > instructions were the
        > > > > > same in his gosho.
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > > To teach the Lotus Sutra is to act with fealessness, to
        > > spread
        > > > > its
        > > > > > > teachings to the lives of ordinary people world wide, and
        > to
        > > > > make its
        > > > > > > principles meanigful in this contemporary time, as Ikeda
        > has
        > > > > > > successfully achieved. To seek a mentor who exemplifies
        the
        > > > > Buddhist
        > > > > > > teachings in the real world beyond the walls of temples,
        is
        > > what
        > > > > > > Nichiren teaches:
        > > > > > > "If there is someoen who knows which of the Buddhist
        > > teachings
        > > > > are
        > > > > > > true and which are false , then i must seek him out, make
        > him
        > > my
        > > > > > > teacher , and treat him with appropriate respect" WND1 p
        105
        > > > > >
        > > > > > There is no dichotomy in the real world between inside or
        > > outside
        > > > > the temples. This is
        > > > > > your own dualism and projection.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > But I agree with this statement. I found my mentor when I
        met
        > > the
        > > > > Ven. Ryusho Matsuda. I
        > > > > > am thankful to have such a face-to-face real mentor who has
        > > > > himself directed me to the
        > > > > > Lotus Sutra and has not tried to be a middle-man. In
        > addition,
        > > he
        > > > > has provided me with an
        > > > > > example of not just a minister or clergyman, but in fact he
        > is
        > > a
        > > > > householder like all of us
        > > > > > here - he is the respected principle of a Japanese language
        > > school
        > > > > for kids, he has raised a
        > > > > > very successful and accomplished children (his son is now
        > head
        > > > > minister of the temple, my
        > > > > > elder brother in the Dharma, and is also a kendo champion,
        > and
        > > the
        > > > > manager of a research
        > > > > > division in a high tech company). He has also served as the
        > > bishop
        > > > > of the Nichiren Order of
        > > > > > North America for many years with all the responsibilities
        > that
        > > > > entails. And with all of this
        > > > > > under his belt, he still says to people, "Let us study
        > > together."
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Note this: He does not say you can't possibly understand or
        > > > > practice the Lotus Sutra
        > > > > > without me, nor does he say you must learn from me or
        follow
        > my
        > > > > guidance.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > What he does say is this: "Let us learn together." And then
        > he
        > > > > directly people right to the
        > > > > > practice and the Lotus Sutra itself.
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > > The word Mentor is synonymous with Teacher of the Law,
        and
        > > one
        > > > > of the
        > > > > > > Lotus Sutra's cahpter is entitled with the Teacher of the
        > > Law, a
        > > > > > > mentor who manifests the teachings in reality.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > There is no contradiction between this and following the
        > Dharma
        > > > > and not the person
        > > > > > UNLESS one starts to pay more attention to the person than
        to
        > > the
        > > > > Dharma and the
        > > > > > teaching is all about the person rather than the Lotus
        Sutra
        > > they
        > > > > should be pointing to. A
        > > > > > true mentor, an authentic mentor, does their best to be
        > > > > transparent so that people will
        > > > > > look beyond them and even their own example of actualizing
        > the
        > > > > Lotus Sutra to the Lotus
        > > > > > Sutra itself that the disciple will actualize the sutra in
        > > their
        > > > > own way. Any other way is just
        > > > > > the way of a personality cult and the way of counting
        someone
        > > > > else's treasure.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Namu Myoho Renge Kyo,
        > > > > > Ryuei
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > >
        >
        *********************************************************************
        > > > > *****************
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >






        ---------------------------------
        Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.