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Re: Innaccurate? Maybe. But True.

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  • andyhanlen2000
    Salem Don writes: << Ikeda�����s first official UN document A New Proposal for Disarmament and the Abolition of Nuclear Weapons (June 1982), was read
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2001
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      Salem Don writes: << Ikeda�s first official
      UN document "A New Proposal for Disarmament and the
      Abolition of Nuclear Weapons" (June 1982), was read at the
      First United Nations Conference on Disarmament. The
      next year he wrote his first Annual Peace Proposal
      asserting, "First of all, I ask that they give top priority
      to a freeze on nuclear weapons. America and the
      Soviet Union should agree to stop the production,
      testing and deployment of nuclear weapons. First it is
      necessary that they agree to halt the arms race now, and
      then they should start nuclear reduction talks." I
      think it is clear who first planted the seeds for
      subsequent nuclear arms controls discussions.
      >><br><br>First let me note that I have no idea of what, if any,
      impact President Ikeda's efforts have had in this arena.
      I believe it is speculative and unquantifiable,
      while admitting (hoping) that he has indeed had some
      impact.<br><br>That said, the particular item (above) is certainly a
      bit of a strectch. You say: "I think it is clear who
      first planted the seeds for subsequent nuclear arms
      controls discussions." You'll have to start much earlier
      than a 1982 Ikeda speech for the first seeds. I'd go
      back at least to the mid-50's and a gentleman named
      Linus Pauling, who was ostracized by many of his peers,
      joined by others, and received a Nobel Peace Prize for
      his efforts. While his main focus initially was on
      stopping atmospheric (above-ground) neclear testing
      (ultimately a successful effort), he and others at that time
      were already calling for a halt to the arms race and
      the abolition of nuclear weapons entirely.<br><br>So,
      while it's fine to applaud President Ikeda's efforts,
      let's not credit him with inventing the wheel, but
      rather with a sincere effort to help it roll
      faster.<br><br>Andy Hanlen
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