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Re: State and Dharma

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  • Robin Ray Beck
    ... the importance of Emperor Godaigo who first gave recognition to Nichiren Buddhism as something apart from Tendai.
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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      --- In SokaGakkaiInternational, ryuei2000 wrote:
      the importance of Emperor Godaigo who first gave recognition to
      Nichiren Buddhism as something apart from Tendai.
      ````````````````````````````````````````````
      Comment: From what I gather, at least two of the Fuji Schools credit
      Nichimoku's mission with achieving this, and think that some of
      Nichiro's disciples undermined GoDaigo. I am still trying to sort
      out the various versions of this history, the "Northern and Southern
      Alliances", etc. I am also trying to give my overloaded brain cells
      a rest, but it is like an obsession.

      robin
    • Terry Ruby
      The reign of Buddhist King Ashoka benefited both Buddhism, the people of the East and the state. The British author H. G. Wells wrote of Ashoka: In the
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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        The reign of Buddhist King Ashoka benefited both Buddhism, the
        people of the East and the state.

        The British author H. G. Wells wrote of Ashoka: "In the history of
        the world there have been thousands of kings and emperors who called
        themselves 'Their Highnesses', 'Their Majesties' and 'Their Exalted
        Majesties' and so on. They shone for a brief moment, and as quickly
        disappeared. But Ashoka shines and shines brightly like a bright
        star, even unto this day."

        Not too many civilizations can claim to have a govenment as people
        oriented as Ashoka's.

        Terry

        --- In SokaGakkaiInternational@yahoogroups.com, "dharmajim"
        <jimfw@h...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Good Friends:
        >
        > A few remarks inspired by the dialogue on Tibetan Buddhism and the
        > current state of the Dharma in Asia.
        >
        > I am of the opinion that every time State and Dharma merge, the
        > Dharma loses. Always. My studies of Dharma history indicate to
        me
        > that when the two merge, the teachings of the Dharma become
        > subordinated to the demands of the state. Examples are the
        merging
        > of State and Dharma in Tibet; where the ruling Gelugs suppressed
        > other forms of Vajrayana (notably the Kagyu and Shentong).
        Another
        > example is Japan, where the Tendai institution became a state
        within
        > the state and sought to impose its will by armed force, attacking
        > both Pure Land and Nichiren temples. In fact, I cannot think of a
        > counterexample; where the Dharma was able to transform the state
        > along lines consistent with Dharma teachings.
        >
        > I think this is why Shakyamuni withdrew from his entitled role as
        a
        > political leader and instead formed a counterculture with its own
        > system of rules and regulations. I think that was a good example
        > and a strong teaching, one that we should follow today.
        >
        > Best wishes,
        >
        > Dharmajim
      • dharmajim
        Hi Terry: That s a good counterexample. Perhaps Prince Shotoku of Japan, who wrote a commentary on the Lotus Sutra, and wrote the first law code for Japan, is
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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          Hi Terry:

          That's a good counterexample. Perhaps Prince Shotoku of Japan, who
          wrote a commentary on the Lotus Sutra, and wrote the first law code
          for Japan, is another. So you're right, there are good examples of
          rulers who have been influenced by the Dharma in a constructive
          direction that benefitted themselves and their people. I'll have to
          keep that in mind.

          In both cases, though (Ashoka and Shotoku), I don't observe what I
          meant by a "merging" of state and Dharma; like what happened in
          Tibet. Admittedly Tibet is an extreme example, but it is something
          along those lines that I was referring to.

          Best wishes,

          Dharmajim


          --- In SokaGakkaiInternational@yahoogroups.com, "Terry Ruby"
          <mububa@c...> wrote:
          >
          > The reign of Buddhist King Ashoka benefited both Buddhism, the
          > people of the East and the state.
          >
          > The British author H. G. Wells wrote of Ashoka: "In the history of
          > the world there have been thousands of kings and emperors who
          called
          > themselves 'Their Highnesses', 'Their Majesties' and 'Their Exalted
          > Majesties' and so on. They shone for a brief moment, and as quickly
          > disappeared. But Ashoka shines and shines brightly like a bright
          > star, even unto this day."
          >
          > Not too many civilizations can claim to have a govenment as people
          > oriented as Ashoka's.
          >
          > Terry
          >
          > --- In SokaGakkaiInternational@yahoogroups.com, "dharmajim"
          > <jimfw@h...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Good Friends:
          > >
          > > A few remarks inspired by the dialogue on Tibetan Buddhism and
          the
          > > current state of the Dharma in Asia.
          > >
          > > I am of the opinion that every time State and Dharma merge, the
          > > Dharma loses. Always. My studies of Dharma history indicate to
          > me
          > > that when the two merge, the teachings of the Dharma become
          > > subordinated to the demands of the state. Examples are the
          > merging
          > > of State and Dharma in Tibet; where the ruling Gelugs suppressed
          > > other forms of Vajrayana (notably the Kagyu and Shentong).
          > Another
          > > example is Japan, where the Tendai institution became a state
          > within
          > > the state and sought to impose its will by armed force, attacking
          > > both Pure Land and Nichiren temples. In fact, I cannot think of
          a
          > > counterexample; where the Dharma was able to transform the state
          > > along lines consistent with Dharma teachings.
          > >
          > > I think this is why Shakyamuni withdrew from his entitled role as
          > a
          > > political leader and instead formed a counterculture with its own
          > > system of rules and regulations. I think that was a good example
          > > and a strong teaching, one that we should follow today.
          > >
          > > Best wishes,
          > >
          > > Dharmajim
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